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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 24, 2010
(From the Getting There blog) The Delaware of Department of Transportation has waived colection of tolls on the Delaware Turnpike in order to ease mounting congestion at its Newark Toll Plaza. Michael Williams, a spokesman for the department, said the decision was made at about 3:15 p.m. to waive northbound tolls until 11 p.m. He said it was the first time in his 15 years with the agency that tolls had been waived. Shorthly before the decision was made, the Maryland Department of Transportation reported that traffic had backed up for about 5.8 miles before the toll plaza, where a construction project has closed thre of its usual nine northbound lanes.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2010
Thanksgiving holiday travelers caught some breaks Wednesday as Delaware moved to uncork a potentially historic bottleneck by waiving tolls on its turnpike, and a much-publicized protest at the nation's airports appeared to have fizzled. The decision to suspend collection of northbound Delaware Turnpike tolls between 3:15 p.m. and 11 p.m. Wednesday came after traffic backed up nearly six miles onto Maryland's John F. Kennedy Memorial Highway. Though the toll plaza at Newark is a well-known bottleneck where hourlong delays are not unusual, it was the first time in at least 15 years the state has waived collections.
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TRAVEL
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2010
This year, even Delaware is warning motorists about the dreaded Delaware toll plaza. Maryland's eastern neighbor has put drivers on alert that they could face significant construction delays approaching its Newark Toll Plaza along Interstate 95 at the height of Thanksgiving travel. In a notice on its website, the Delaware Department of Transportation took the unusual step of urging motorists to find a way around paying a $4 toll each way for the privilege of using the Delaware Turnpike.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 24, 2010
(From the Getting There blog) The Delaware of Department of Transportation has waived colection of tolls on the Delaware Turnpike in order to ease mounting congestion at its Newark Toll Plaza. Michael Williams, a spokesman for the department, said the decision was made at about 3:15 p.m. to waive northbound tolls until 11 p.m. He said it was the first time in his 15 years with the agency that tolls had been waived. Shorthly before the decision was made, the Maryland Department of Transportation reported that traffic had backed up for about 5.8 miles before the toll plaza, where a construction project has closed thre of its usual nine northbound lanes.
TRAVEL
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2010
It seems that for every good route to bypass the mid-Atlantic region's worst traffic bottlenecks, there's a better one. At least, that's what Getting There readers tell me as the Thanksgiving holiday weekend looms. Last week, I suggested strategies to avoid some of the worst traffic on the busiest travel days of the year – especially Wednesday and Sunday. At the time, readers were asked to contribute their refinements to these suggestions, and they responded generously with advice – though some weren't as generous with their names.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2010
Taking to the roads this week for Thanksgiving is shaping up to be a grueling experience, especially for motorists headed north on Interstate 95. While the weather is expected to be pleasant and sunny, the forecast from Delaware is decidedly bleak, with that state's transportation officials suggesting travelers avoid going through the Newark Toll Plaza for much of the holiday weekend. Robert King, a spokesman for the Delaware Department of Transportation, said the northbound toll plaza will be down to six lanes instead of the normal nine because of a reconstruction project that is intended to make traffic flow through the notorious bottleneck better — starting in the summer of 2011.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2010
Thanksgiving holiday travelers caught some breaks Wednesday as Delaware moved to uncork a potentially historic bottleneck by waiving tolls on its turnpike, and a much-publicized protest at the nation's airports appeared to have fizzled. The decision to suspend collection of northbound Delaware Turnpike tolls between 3:15 p.m. and 11 p.m. Wednesday came after traffic backed up nearly six miles onto Maryland's John F. Kennedy Memorial Highway. Though the toll plaza at Newark is a well-known bottleneck where hourlong delays are not unusual, it was the first time in at least 15 years the state has waived collections.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | November 20, 2006
This week, tens of thousands of Marylanders will take off Wednesday or early Thursday and head northward on Interstate 95 to New Jersey or New York or New England or wherever Mom stuffs her turkey. Last year, these same people ran into nightmarish backups at the toll plazas in Delaware -- especially on the Sunday evening drive home. They reported to the office the following Monday with stories of woe about hours-long backups with the kids screaming for a bathroom. This year, with the benefit of amnesia that 12 months can bring, many of the same people will take the same route at about the same time and get the same result.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 13, 1998
Electronic toll collection that eliminates the need to stop and pay tolls, known as E-Z Pass, is available to motorists using the Delaware Turnpike (Interstate 95).As motorists drive through the E-Z Pass toll lanes on the turnpike, an overhead antenna reads account information from an electronic "tag" affixed to the vehicle and the toll amount is deducted from their prepaid account.The system is widely used in New York City.Applications are available by calling 888-288-6865.Pub Date: 11/13/98
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2010
By car: It's 155 miles from Baltimore to Atlantic City, via Interstate 95 North, I-295 North, the New Jersey Turnpike and the Atlantic City Expressway. The trip should take roughly 2.5 to 3 hours (unless you get stuck in I-95 traffic, which could add hours, if not days, to the trip). Be prepared for tolls at the Millard E. Tydings Bridge over the Susquehanna River, the Delaware Turnpike, the Delaware Memorial Bridge, the New Jersey Turnpike and the Atlantic City Expressway. By bus: Greyhound offers service between Baltimore (either the downtown or the travel plaza station)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2010
Taking to the roads this week for Thanksgiving is shaping up to be a grueling experience, especially for motorists headed north on Interstate 95. While the weather is expected to be pleasant and sunny, the forecast from Delaware is decidedly bleak, with that state's transportation officials suggesting travelers avoid going through the Newark Toll Plaza for much of the holiday weekend. Robert King, a spokesman for the Delaware Department of Transportation, said the northbound toll plaza will be down to six lanes instead of the normal nine because of a reconstruction project that is intended to make traffic flow through the notorious bottleneck better — starting in the summer of 2011.
TRAVEL
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2010
It seems that for every good route to bypass the mid-Atlantic region's worst traffic bottlenecks, there's a better one. At least, that's what Getting There readers tell me as the Thanksgiving holiday weekend looms. Last week, I suggested strategies to avoid some of the worst traffic on the busiest travel days of the year – especially Wednesday and Sunday. At the time, readers were asked to contribute their refinements to these suggestions, and they responded generously with advice – though some weren't as generous with their names.
TRAVEL
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2010
This year, even Delaware is warning motorists about the dreaded Delaware toll plaza. Maryland's eastern neighbor has put drivers on alert that they could face significant construction delays approaching its Newark Toll Plaza along Interstate 95 at the height of Thanksgiving travel. In a notice on its website, the Delaware Department of Transportation took the unusual step of urging motorists to find a way around paying a $4 toll each way for the privilege of using the Delaware Turnpike.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | November 20, 2006
This week, tens of thousands of Marylanders will take off Wednesday or early Thursday and head northward on Interstate 95 to New Jersey or New York or New England or wherever Mom stuffs her turkey. Last year, these same people ran into nightmarish backups at the toll plazas in Delaware -- especially on the Sunday evening drive home. They reported to the office the following Monday with stories of woe about hours-long backups with the kids screaming for a bathroom. This year, with the benefit of amnesia that 12 months can bring, many of the same people will take the same route at about the same time and get the same result.
NEWS
July 7, 1995
HERE'S what the Wilmington News-Journal had to say in a recent editorial on the joys of working in turnpike toll booths:"An official of the Delaware Department of Transportation says Delaware Turnpike toll collectors are 'ambassadors for Delaware.' Some ambassadors! For wages that leave some toll takers below the poverty level and are capped at $20,000 a year, these men and women put up with unspeakable abuse from patrons, work in stuffy, old-fashioned booths, go home with automobile exhaust clinging to their bodies and their clothing, and breathe in a rich miasma of toxic gases.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,getting.there@baltsun.com | September 15, 2008
The emergency repairs that caused those massive Bay Bridge traffic jams are done for now. And we can expect the interest they generated in building a new span to fade as fast as our interest in the Orioles' 2008 season. But the issue of bay crossing capacity isn't going away. Nor are the problems that have kept past efforts to address the matter from getting off the ground. Calling for the construction of a new span might be a great applause line at times when the bridge has become a bottleneck, but the cheering tends to fade when the emergency passes and the actual ramifications are considered.
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