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Delaware Memorial Bridge

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2010
By car: It's 155 miles from Baltimore to Atlantic City, via Interstate 95 North, I-295 North, the New Jersey Turnpike and the Atlantic City Expressway. The trip should take roughly 2.5 to 3 hours (unless you get stuck in I-95 traffic, which could add hours, if not days, to the trip). Be prepared for tolls at the Millard E. Tydings Bridge over the Susquehanna River, the Delaware Turnpike, the Delaware Memorial Bridge, the New Jersey Turnpike and the Atlantic City Expressway. By bus: Greyhound offers service between Baltimore (either the downtown or the travel plaza station)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2010
By car: It's 155 miles from Baltimore to Atlantic City, via Interstate 95 North, I-295 North, the New Jersey Turnpike and the Atlantic City Expressway. The trip should take roughly 2.5 to 3 hours (unless you get stuck in I-95 traffic, which could add hours, if not days, to the trip). Be prepared for tolls at the Millard E. Tydings Bridge over the Susquehanna River, the Delaware Turnpike, the Delaware Memorial Bridge, the New Jersey Turnpike and the Atlantic City Expressway. By bus: Greyhound offers service between Baltimore (either the downtown or the travel plaza station)
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NEWS
November 12, 2002
John E. Weidemuller, founder and president of Weidemuller Construction Co., a Baltimore-based heavy construction company, died Saturday at Union Memorial Hospital of complications from a fall. He was 86 and lived in the city's Guilford section. Born and raised in Pittsburgh, he earned his bachelor's degree in civil engineering from University of Pittsburgh in 1937. Mr. Weidemuller began his career with the Army Corps of Engineers and, during World War II, worked for Koppers Co., revamping closed steel mills that were needed for the war effort.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | November 20, 2006
This week, tens of thousands of Marylanders will take off Wednesday or early Thursday and head northward on Interstate 95 to New Jersey or New York or New England or wherever Mom stuffs her turkey. Last year, these same people ran into nightmarish backups at the toll plazas in Delaware -- especially on the Sunday evening drive home. They reported to the office the following Monday with stories of woe about hours-long backups with the kids screaming for a bathroom. This year, with the benefit of amnesia that 12 months can bring, many of the same people will take the same route at about the same time and get the same result.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | November 20, 2006
This week, tens of thousands of Marylanders will take off Wednesday or early Thursday and head northward on Interstate 95 to New Jersey or New York or New England or wherever Mom stuffs her turkey. Last year, these same people ran into nightmarish backups at the toll plazas in Delaware -- especially on the Sunday evening drive home. They reported to the office the following Monday with stories of woe about hours-long backups with the kids screaming for a bathroom. This year, with the benefit of amnesia that 12 months can bring, many of the same people will take the same route at about the same time and get the same result.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1997
Some people sit in the front seat with their eyes closed. Some cower on the floor behind the driver's seat with a blanket over their heads. Others hum to drown out the noise or they talk -- a lot.Anything to get their minds off a simple 10-minute drive that 20 million other motorists take each year without so much as a second thought.They are the bridge phobics, and for them, the Bay Bridge feels like the ultimate death ride."I feel like a big chicken," says Tom Perricone, a 42-year-old computer specialist from Annapolis.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2000
NEW CASTLE, Del. - The Delaware section of the highway starts here, at the western base of the Memorial Bridge amid a confusing welter of exits and entrances, fly-over ramps and directional signs. At the southern tip of the Philadelphia-Wilmington megalopolis, Interstate 295 South bends northwest to meet Interstate 95, the East Coast's high-speed Main Street. Heading south, in a little more than 12 miles, I-95 cuts across the thinnest part of Delaware, from the edges of ugly urban sprawl to carefully landscaped campuses of exurban office complexes and finally to forests and farmhouses near the Maryland line.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | April 5, 1994
PRIOR to the opening of the Delaware Memorial Bridge on Aug. 14, 1951, Baltimoreans drove to New York via old Route 40 (Old Philadelphia Road) through Elkton and into Delaware. (Those were the days when highways actually went through towns -- like Aberdeen, Md., and Glasgow and Bear, Del.) At New Castle, Del., motorists had to wait for the ferry across the Delaware River to Pennsville on the New Jersey side. Then it was north to the Big Apple.But as was the case with so many ferries, there simply got to be too many cars.
NEWS
July 20, 2010
State Rep. Pat McDonough stated in The Baltimore Sun ("Arizona's admirable law," July 18) that the Arizona immigration law is "nothing more" than a restatement of federal law. Of course, he is aware that the federal government has jurisdiction over areas that the states don't, and vice versa. And, of course, he fails to mention that inconvenient little sticking point. Knowing that, why would he intend to introduce such a law in the upcoming session, knowing that the Arizona law is being challenged?
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 17, 2008
Carl-Eric Beve, a retired Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. civil engineer, died of pulmonary disease May 8 at Augsburg Lutheran Village. The former Villa Nova resident was 95. Born in Sundsvall, Sweden, he came to the United States to study civil engineering at Cornell University, where he was a member of the Class of 1938 and the ski team captain. While at school, he met his future wife, Ludmila "Mimi" Koshkin. The couple settled in Baltimore in 1945, when Mr. Beve was hired as the fourth engineer with Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. In his 33-year career, he was involved with work at the Glenn L. Martin aircraft plant in Middle River, the Russell Street Viaduct in downtown Baltimore and the Delaware Memorial Bridge, among other assignments.
NEWS
November 12, 2002
John E. Weidemuller, founder and president of Weidemuller Construction Co., a Baltimore-based heavy construction company, died Saturday at Union Memorial Hospital of complications from a fall. He was 86 and lived in the city's Guilford section. Born and raised in Pittsburgh, he earned his bachelor's degree in civil engineering from University of Pittsburgh in 1937. Mr. Weidemuller began his career with the Army Corps of Engineers and, during World War II, worked for Koppers Co., revamping closed steel mills that were needed for the war effort.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2000
NEW CASTLE, Del. - The Delaware section of the highway starts here, at the western base of the Memorial Bridge amid a confusing welter of exits and entrances, fly-over ramps and directional signs. At the southern tip of the Philadelphia-Wilmington megalopolis, Interstate 295 South bends northwest to meet Interstate 95, the East Coast's high-speed Main Street. Heading south, in a little more than 12 miles, I-95 cuts across the thinnest part of Delaware, from the edges of ugly urban sprawl to carefully landscaped campuses of exurban office complexes and finally to forests and farmhouses near the Maryland line.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1997
Some people sit in the front seat with their eyes closed. Some cower on the floor behind the driver's seat with a blanket over their heads. Others hum to drown out the noise or they talk -- a lot.Anything to get their minds off a simple 10-minute drive that 20 million other motorists take each year without so much as a second thought.They are the bridge phobics, and for them, the Bay Bridge feels like the ultimate death ride."I feel like a big chicken," says Tom Perricone, a 42-year-old computer specialist from Annapolis.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | January 19, 2008
The vice president of a bankrupt Columbia mortgage lender apparently jumped to his death from the Delaware Memorial Bridge yesterday shortly after his wife's body was found inside their New Jersey home, police said. Police are investigating the deaths of Walter P. Buczynski, 59, and his wife, Marcie Buczynski, 37, as a murder-suicide. Walter Buczynski was vice president of the subprime mortgage lender Fieldstone Investment Corp. Rescue workers began looking for Buczynski's body in the Delaware River after a report that a man had stopped his blue Acura sport utility vehicle on the westbound side of the Delaware Memorial Bridge about 12:30 p.m. and jumped, according to the Burlington County, N.J., prosecutor's office.
NEWS
August 16, 1995
Maryland spent $11 million a few years ago to smooth the flow on Interstate 95 at the John F. Kennedy Memorial Highway toll plaza at Perryville, just east of the Susquehanna River.Unfortunately, but for a buck and a quarter just up the road in Delaware a far worse back-up begins -- in both directions.While Maryland switched to one-way toll collection on its portion of I-95, speeding travel both northbound and southbound, Delaware's toll collection facility continues to be a bottleneck on the nation's major East Coast highway.
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