Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDelaware Bay
IN THE NEWS

Delaware Bay

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | May 27, 1995
BIVALVE, N.J. -- On a late-August morning in 1956, Clyde A. Phillips had perhaps history's first encounter with the tinymonster that would change a way of life on both Delaware and Chesapeake bays.Phillips, a prosperous oyster planter, had gone that fateful morning for a routine, pre-season inspection of his shellfish beds that lay off what might be called the "other" Jersey Shore.These vast marshes, brackish tidal rivers and isolated necks bordering Delaware Bay today seem like the dark side of the moon compared with the bustle and throng of Cape May, Wildwood, Atlantic City and the state's other Atlantic beaches.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
The Scunny Memorial Paddle, which ran from Sept. 16 to 21, turned out to be even less fun than Christopher Furst, a marketing director for Power Plant Live, thought it would be. And the novice kayaker didn't go in expecting the 175-mile kayak trip was going to be a day at the beach. "In all honesty, it was the hardest thing I've ever done in my life. I've played every sport, baseball, football," Furst said, "but this was sheer endurance, paddling eight hours a day in an uncomfortable position.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Reporter | June 2, 2007
The discovery of four Chinese mitten crabs in the Delaware Bay prompted scientists to broadcast an alert to the entire East Coast yesterday amid the increasing likelihood that the native Asian crustacean is reproducing in the region. "To me, this suggests that they are more likely to be reproducing here and in the system here than continuing to be delivered fresh," said Greg Ruiz, the senior scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Md. "It's not likely that we would see a continuing supply of mitten crab larvae from overseas, so that we would continue to catch these mitten crabs in the Delaware and Chesapeake bays."
TRAVEL
The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
MAY Horseshoe Crab and Shorebird Festival. Pay tribute to the natural wonders of Delaware Bay - the horseshoe crbas and migrating shorebirds - at this festival on May 24 at Milton Memorial Park. Visitors can take boat rides, join a scavenger hunt and see arts and crafts as well as live music and food. Free. Info: historicmilton.com 'Cruisin' Exhibit. Mark the history of motion with this exhibit celebrating bicycles, pedal cars and toys. Opens May 24 at the Rehoboth Beach Museum.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | April 23, 2012
The Obama administration's move to open the mid- and South Atlantic coasts to offshore oil and gas exploration is scheduled to get a public airing in Annapolis on Wednesday. The Annapolis session is one of a series being held from Florida to New Jersey to take public comments on the Interior Department's proposal to permit seismic and other testing off the Atlantic coast from Delaware Bay to just south of Cape Canaveral, FL The administration had proposed lifting the long-standing ban on Atlantic offshore exploration in 2010, but then reinstated it in the wake of the massive Deepwater Horizon drilling rig blowout in the Gulf of Mexico.  Last month, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced Atlantic testing was back on as part of President Obama's "all-of-the-above" energy strategy.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns and Michael K. Burns,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2002
PORT MAHON, Del. - Waves of wings excitedly flutter and bob over these sandy flats of Delaware Bay in an annual ecological ritual that is one of nature's greatest spectaculars. It is a spring synchrony of migration - of shorebirds from South American winter quarters en route to Arctic breeding grounds and of arch-ancient horseshoe crabs driven from ocean bottoms to spawning beaches by tide, temperature and lunar cycles. One million small birds, some of which fly as far as 20,000 miles a year, alight on these dunes in late May for a critical refueling stop just as the olive-brown, helmet-shaped arthropods lumber ashore to lay billions of eggs in the sand.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | June 27, 1998
THE SUMMER I turned six years old my grandfather, Edward Jacques Monaghan, started my lessons in navigation.Our crow's-nest was a screened porch on the second floor of the Sussex Apartments in Rehoboth Beach. Every year, on the last Saturday in June, my family closed the door on its Guilford Avenue rowhouse and opened a new one there facing the ocean. For the next month or so, our address was Olive Avenue and the Boardwalk,Built in 1931, the Sussex commanded a 180-degree view of the Atlantic from Cape Henlopen to Dewey Beach.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2000
The U.S. commerce secretary ordered Virginia yesterday to close its horseshoe crab fishery after the state failed to heed repeated warnings to set stricter limits on its catch. The population of horseshoe crabs, an ancient species that spawns on Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean beaches, has been declining for at least seven years, according to surveys in several states. As reports of the dwindling population spread, Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey slashed their harvests by 75 percent.
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMPSON and CANDUS THOMPSON,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2006
It is one of those exquisitely choreographed moments in nature: A small bird on its way from the bottom of the world to its breeding ground at the top encounters its nutritional lifeline as it lands on sandy beaches along the Delaware Bay. Red knots arrive from South America, exhausted and emaciated. Horseshoe crabs swim from sea to shore, following their prehistoric instinct to procreate. They get together each spring for their annual date, a two-week springtime feast and orgy that has been performed longer than humans have been recording such things.
BUSINESS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2003
Before the first ferryboats crossed the mouth of Delaware Bay in 1964, Lewes, Del., and Cape May, N.J., were sleepy beach communities searching for something to boost their sagging economies, which relied on a handful of fading fish factories and a flotilla of watermen that supplied East Coast restaurants with seafood. Today, a modern glass and gray stone ferry terminal sits near what used to be a fish factory in Lewes. A former marine parts store is now a candle shop catering to the 1.2 million tourists who funnel through the town each year on their way to and from the ferry.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | April 23, 2012
The Obama administration's move to open the mid- and South Atlantic coasts to offshore oil and gas exploration is scheduled to get a public airing in Annapolis on Wednesday. The Annapolis session is one of a series being held from Florida to New Jersey to take public comments on the Interior Department's proposal to permit seismic and other testing off the Atlantic coast from Delaware Bay to just south of Cape Canaveral, FL The administration had proposed lifting the long-standing ban on Atlantic offshore exploration in 2010, but then reinstated it in the wake of the massive Deepwater Horizon drilling rig blowout in the Gulf of Mexico.  Last month, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced Atlantic testing was back on as part of President Obama's "all-of-the-above" energy strategy.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
The Obama administration took another step Monday toward opening the Mid-Atlantic coast for offshore wind development, but in the process slashed Maryland's potential stake in the developing new energy industry by more than half. Pointing to concerns about shipping safety, the Department of Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement reduced the area off Ocean City where industrial wind turbines might be placed from 206 square nautical miles to 94 square nautical miles.
NEWS
June 24, 2011
To set the record straight, conservation organizations aren't the only ones that believe red knots should be protected under the Endangered Species Act ("Counting crabs," June 20). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agrees, which is why it placed the shorebird on the ESA candidate list in 2006. And we are not alone in supporting a moratorium on the harvest of horseshoe crabs; leading red knot scientists from the U.S., Canada, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay and Brazil also support a timeout on the take of crabs of Delaware Bay origin — particularly after observing a 5,000 bird drop in wintering locations this year.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2011
COOK'S BEACH, N.J. — The small bird sitting along this sandy spit of land is starving and dinner offerings are slim. Having flown 5,000 miles from South America and with 5,000 to go to its Arctic breeding ground, the red knot needs to fatten up along Delaware Bay or die. For tens of thousands of birds over the last decade, death has been inevitable. The red knot population, scientists believe, may be down to its last 25,000. Two weeks ago, bird experts and environmentalists called on the federal government to accelerate the review process for placing the red knot on the endangered species list.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | August 23, 2009
Heather O'Donnell of Bowie writes: "I've read many places that the watershed for the Chesapeake Bay goes all the way up to near Cooperstown in New York. Yet, when I'm driving up I-95 toward New Jersey, I see a big billboard that tells me I'm leaving the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Who is right?" Tom Zolper of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation replies: "The sign is correct. The Chesapeake Bay watershed encompasses parts of six states (Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia)
TRAVEL
By Diane Stoneback and Diane Stoneback,Tribune Newspapers | May 10, 2009
Watching the brilliant yellow-to-scarlet-to-purple sundowns or the Cape May-Lewes Ferry peacefully plying the Delaware Bay from Cape May's Sunset Beach, it's hard to imagine the turbulent times when this beautiful location was heavily fortified and played a vital role in the nation's homeland defense system. But the grand opening Saturday of the newly restored World War II Lookout Tower (Fire Control Tower No. 23) Museum and Memorial brings a very different time into focus. "The fire tower, constructed in 1942, is our centerpiece in recent efforts to emphasize Cape May's largely underappreciated and under-publicized role during World War II," says Robert Heinly, museum coordinator for the Mid-Atlantic Center for the Arts in Cape May, which has spent the last seven years restoring the stark concrete tower.
NEWS
February 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - The horseshoe crab sanctuary off Delaware Bay, announced with great fanfare in August and tied up in the federal rule-making process since then, will go into effect March 7, the National Marine Fisheries Service announced yesterday. The sanctuary, which covers about 1,500 square miles of federal waters from south of Pecks Beach, N.J., to just north of Ocean City, is part of a management plan to protect the ancient creatures, whose numbers have declined in recent years. Horseshoe crabs, which predate dinosaurs, are valued as bait in conch and eel fisheries and for pharmaceutical tests, and the eggs they leave on the Chesapeake and Delaware bay beaches are an abundant food for migrating shorebirds on their way to Canadian nesting areas.
NEWS
May 12, 2000
The National Marine Fisheries Service has proposed banning fishing for horseshoe crabs in federal waters off the mouth of Delaware Bay in an attempt to protect the valuable species. The ban is part of a plan to manage fishing for the helmet-shaped creatures, which was adopted in April by the multistate agency that regulates East Coast commercial fishing. Fisheries officials said it is not a response to Delaware Gov. Thomas R. Carper's written request last week for an immediate moratorium on harvesting horseshoe crabs within 30 miles of the mouth of Delaware Bay. "We've been working with the Atlantic State's Marine Fisheries Commission and we're looking for public input," said Gordon Helm, a fisheries service spokesman.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | March 18, 2009
Turning aside calls for a ban on the commercial harvest of horseshoe crabs, Maryland officials are imposing a new limit on the catch in an attempt to help shorebirds that migrate up the Atlantic coast in spring. Effective April 1, fishermen will be required to catch two male horseshoe crabs for every female they keep, the Department of Natural Resources said yesterday. The rule is designed to increase the availability of horseshoe crab eggs on mid-Atlantic beaches when migratory shorebirds arrive in May and June.
NEWS
By Charles D. Duncan | August 5, 2008
With the Summer Olympics almost upon us, it seems appropriate to take special note of an ultra-marathon champion that seldom gets the attention it deserves. The event is seemingly impossible: a journey from Tierra del Fuego to the Canadian Arctic and back, 9,300 miles each way, in nonstop stages that last days without food or water. And like some nightmare of Roman gladiators, if you fail, you die. But there's a catch: The participants can fly. These ultra-marathoners are migratory red knots, shorebirds not much more than half the weight of a pigeon.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.