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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 7, 2003
I never thought I'd see the day when people would be interested in what two old Negro women have to say," Bessie Delany remarks near the start of Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First 100 Years. Bessie, who was the second black dentist licensed in New York, may not have been wrong about much in her 100+ years, but she certainly underestimated the interest in her and her older sister, Sadie. Their memoir became a best seller; the play adapted by Emily Mann from that memoir became a Broadway hit; and it, in turn, was made into a TV movie.
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
COLLEGE PARK - History will smile on the University of Maryland's move to the Big Ten, and the school's football and other athletic teams can compete in the new conference right away, Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany said in an appearance on campus Tuesday. "We're ready for Maryland," Delany said. "Everyone in the Big Ten is excited. We believe it's going to be a mutually beneficial partnership. " Delany was in College Park for a symposium on the school's move to the Big Ten, held by the university's Shirley Povich Center for Sports Journalism.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 10, 1997
"Some people grieve to remember, but we celebrate," says Bessie Delany in "Having Our Say," Emily Mann's play about the centenarian Delany sisters. And indeed, "Having Our Say" -- currently at the Mechanic Theatre -- is an endearing celebration from start to finish.Adapted from the book of the same name, written by Sarah ("Sadie") L. Delany and A. Elizabeth ("Bessie") Delany, with Amy Hill Hearth, this two-person play celebrates the lives of a pair of extraordinary women. Daughters of a former slave who became, in Bessie's words, "the first elected Negro bishop of the Episcopal Church, U.S.A," Bessie was the second African-American woman licensed to practice dentistry in New York and Sadie was the first African-American domestic science teacher in a New York City high school.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | December 7, 2012
Affable Barry Alvarez is back coaching the Wisconsin Badgers football team, and we're all better for it. Speaking the university's athletic board Friday, he revealed another motivation for the Big Ten to go after Maryland and Rutgers: keeping Penn State. The fear was that shifting conference footprints might leave Penn State feeling alienated on the East Coast and tempted to join another conference. With Pitt to the west and Syracuse to the north, it doesn't take much imagination to see that Penn State could have looked at the ACC. Here's Barry: “That northeast corridor, all the way to the south, continues to grow…[Big Ten commissioner]
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 8, 1997
"Child, I feel like I've known you all my life," centenarian Sadie Delany told playwright and director Emily Mann on the first afternoon they spent together.Mann was visiting Sadie and her sister Bessie while researching the play "Having Our Say," which went on to become one of the hits of the 1994-1995 Broadway season and is now on a national tour. (It arrives at the Mechanic Theatre tonight.)Adapted from the memoir written by Sarah ("Sadie") L. Delany and A. Elizabeth ("Bessie") Delany with writer Amy Hill Hearth, "Having Our Say" is Mann's two-person drama, which quietly and movingly relates 100 years of American history.
NEWS
January 26, 1999
Sarah "Sadie" Delany, 109, the last of the storied Delany sisters, died peacefully in her sleep yesterday at her home in Mount Vernon, N.Y., spokesmen for her family said.She was the oldest survivor of one of America's most remarkable families, the daughter of a man who had been born a slave, and the first colored woman -- the term she preferred -- ever permitted to teach home economics in white New York City schools.Miss Delany and her younger sister, Dr. A. Elizabeth "Bessie" Delany, were always celebrated in Harlem, where they lived and flourished from 1916 to 1957, after leaving their native Raleigh, N.C.The sisters gained widespread fame after the publication in 1993 of a memoir they called "Having Our Say; The Delany Sisters' First 100 Years."
NEWS
September 14, 1994
JUST A LOT of bitter, jealous friends."That was the fallout for Jack Germond, syndicated columnist in The Baltimore Sun's Washington bureau, in the days after actress Dana Delany was quoted in US magazine that she considered him the sexiest man alive.Mr. Germond said he wasn't sure when or whether he'll get to meet Ms. Delany, but said some mutual friends were talking about arranging a get-together. Ms. Delany's comment was picked up on the wires and the Washington Post juxtaposed a headshot of the bald columnist with a photo of the actress dressed in whips-and-chains garb for an upcoming film.
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder | February 26, 1991
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany said yesterday he has censured and reprimanded Minnesota basketball coach Clem Haskins for comments made about the officials after the Gophers' 63-62 loss to second-ranked Ohio State Saturday in Columbus, Ohio.Haskins called the officials "jackasses" and lambasted them for "having cost us the game.""Conference regulation 3-2-D prohibits undue public criticism of officials," Delany said. "And Coach Haskins' comments of Feb. 23 were in violation of this standard."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1998
Sun staff writer Don Markus continues the March Madness Tour that will take him to eight conference tournaments in eight days.CHICAGO -- Timing in college basketball isn't merely about blocking shots or taking charges or tipping in offensive rebounds. It has to do with marketing and public relations, with perception and reality.In the case of the inaugural Big Ten tournament, the timing couldn't be worse.Forget the lack of highly ranked teams and marquee players.Or even the lack of teams on the NCAA tournament bubble.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | September 29, 1995
BOSTON -- Bessie Delany became famous at 100. One day in 1991, a reporter came to the house that Bessie shared with her elder sister Sadie in Mount Vernon, New York. ''Go on, sit down,'' Bessie told Amy Hill Hearth. ''Sit down as long as you like. We won't charge you rent.''The reporter sat and listened. Bessie and Sadie Delany sat and talked. And the country became the richer for it. The sisters' stories about their long life and their good hard times as ''Negro maiden ladies'' were told with such honesty and clarity that Americans also listened.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 7, 2003
I never thought I'd see the day when people would be interested in what two old Negro women have to say," Bessie Delany remarks near the start of Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First 100 Years. Bessie, who was the second black dentist licensed in New York, may not have been wrong about much in her 100+ years, but she certainly underestimated the interest in her and her older sister, Sadie. Their memoir became a best seller; the play adapted by Emily Mann from that memoir became a Broadway hit; and it, in turn, was made into a TV movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 31, 2003
Ever since it opened at Arena Players last fall, director Randolph Smith's production of Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First 100 Years has been having its say all over town. "I don't think there's been anything like this [at Arena Players]. We did this in November of last year, and then we went out to Catonsville Community College in February, and we were at Artscape over the weekend, and we'll be at Cockpit in Court at Essex Community College on Aug. 1," Smith said. Adapted by playwright Emily Mann from the 1993 memoir by Sarah ("Sadie")
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 24, 2002
Presidio Med, a new medical drama from ABC, is the worst kind of new fall series. It's the kind that makes you crazed about the way network television can waste tremendously talented performers in the worst sort of formulaic, assembly-line mush. There are wall-to-wall flawed, awful new series this fall, and none of them makes me angry the way Presidio Med does. How you can take a cast that includes Blythe Danner, Anna Deavere Smith, Dana Delany and Julianne Nicholson - along with Ossie Davis as guest star - and wind up with such a sorry soap opera of a series is almost beyond comprehension.
NEWS
January 26, 1999
Sarah "Sadie" Delany, 109, the last of the storied Delany sisters, died peacefully in her sleep yesterday at her home in Mount Vernon, N.Y., spokesmen for her family said.She was the oldest survivor of one of America's most remarkable families, the daughter of a man who had been born a slave, and the first colored woman -- the term she preferred -- ever permitted to teach home economics in white New York City schools.Miss Delany and her younger sister, Dr. A. Elizabeth "Bessie" Delany, were always celebrated in Harlem, where they lived and flourished from 1916 to 1957, after leaving their native Raleigh, N.C.The sisters gained widespread fame after the publication in 1993 of a memoir they called "Having Our Say; The Delany Sisters' First 100 Years."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1998
Sun staff writer Don Markus continues the March Madness Tour that will take him to eight conference tournaments in eight days.CHICAGO -- Timing in college basketball isn't merely about blocking shots or taking charges or tipping in offensive rebounds. It has to do with marketing and public relations, with perception and reality.In the case of the inaugural Big Ten tournament, the timing couldn't be worse.Forget the lack of highly ranked teams and marquee players.Or even the lack of teams on the NCAA tournament bubble.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 10, 1997
"Some people grieve to remember, but we celebrate," says Bessie Delany in "Having Our Say," Emily Mann's play about the centenarian Delany sisters. And indeed, "Having Our Say" -- currently at the Mechanic Theatre -- is an endearing celebration from start to finish.Adapted from the book of the same name, written by Sarah ("Sadie") L. Delany and A. Elizabeth ("Bessie") Delany, with Amy Hill Hearth, this two-person play celebrates the lives of a pair of extraordinary women. Daughters of a former slave who became, in Bessie's words, "the first elected Negro bishop of the Episcopal Church, U.S.A," Bessie was the second African-American woman licensed to practice dentistry in New York and Sadie was the first African-American domestic science teacher in a New York City high school.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 18, 1994
At some point in its misty origins, "Exit to Eden" was evidently a soft-core porn novel by Anne Rice, exploring the spicy but rarely observed world of sadomasochistic sex. It turned on a melancholy dominatrix and her redemption at the ministrations of an idealistic lover. But how it went from that to this -- a crass, tasteless, witless Rosie O'Donnell picture -- is hard to imagine. Worse, why bother?Directed as if in a stupor by Garry Marshall, it's become a lame "Dragnet" parody that assumes there are three people left in the world who remember what "Dragnet" was and consider it worth parodying.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | December 7, 2012
Affable Barry Alvarez is back coaching the Wisconsin Badgers football team, and we're all better for it. Speaking the university's athletic board Friday, he revealed another motivation for the Big Ten to go after Maryland and Rutgers: keeping Penn State. The fear was that shifting conference footprints might leave Penn State feeling alienated on the East Coast and tempted to join another conference. With Pitt to the west and Syracuse to the north, it doesn't take much imagination to see that Penn State could have looked at the ACC. Here's Barry: “That northeast corridor, all the way to the south, continues to grow…[Big Ten commissioner]
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 8, 1997
"Child, I feel like I've known you all my life," centenarian Sadie Delany told playwright and director Emily Mann on the first afternoon they spent together.Mann was visiting Sadie and her sister Bessie while researching the play "Having Our Say," which went on to become one of the hits of the 1994-1995 Broadway season and is now on a national tour. (It arrives at the Mechanic Theatre tonight.)Adapted from the memoir written by Sarah ("Sadie") L. Delany and A. Elizabeth ("Bessie") Delany with writer Amy Hill Hearth, "Having Our Say" is Mann's two-person drama, which quietly and movingly relates 100 years of American history.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | September 29, 1995
BOSTON -- Bessie Delany became famous at 100. One day in 1991, a reporter came to the house that Bessie shared with her elder sister Sadie in Mount Vernon, New York. ''Go on, sit down,'' Bessie told Amy Hill Hearth. ''Sit down as long as you like. We won't charge you rent.''The reporter sat and listened. Bessie and Sadie Delany sat and talked. And the country became the richer for it. The sisters' stories about their long life and their good hard times as ''Negro maiden ladies'' were told with such honesty and clarity that Americans also listened.
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