Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDelacroix
IN THE NEWS

Delacroix

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Francesca Chapman and Francesca Chapman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 8, 1998
PHILADELPHIA - "Delacroix: The Late Work," will be on display through Jan. 3 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art."Sex and violence" marks the work of the 19th-century French master, says Joseph J. Rishel, curator of the museumThe museum's display of 70 paintings and 40 drawings by Eugene Delacroix (1798-1863) has an ample helping of bosomy maidens in distress, big cats shredding their prey and Turks waving scimitars. That should help get you in the door.Once there, however, confronted with the vivid canvases - which also include tranquil seascapes, jewel-like still lifes and deeply felt biblical scenes - you can ponder the place of Delacroix in the evolution of art.Link between old and newThe museum's experts consider Delacroix the link between the last Old Masters and the first artists of the French Romantic movement.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
Documents released this week as part of a battle in federal court to determine the ownership of a miniature Renoir landscape also provide intriguing glimpses into the life of Saidie A. May, a prolific art collector whose bequests helped the Baltimore Museum of Art build a world-class collection. The 1879 painting "Paysage Bords de Seine" was stolen from the Baltimore Museum of Art in 1951 and is now the subject of a dispute between the institution and a woman who says she bought it at a flea market decades later for $7. That painting was one of many family treasures May left to the museum or to friends and relatives before she died in 1951.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | September 27, 1998
It is a scene of quiet after the roar of violence. The mob who stoned the saint to death is gone. Three people struggle to lift the lifeless body as a woman kneels and wipes blood from a step.One can imagine it on film, with only the sounds of the heavy breathing of those carrying the body and the slight scratching of cloth on stone. Although six people inhabit the picture, the silence and solitude of death permeate it.This little painting, "Saint Stephen Borne Away by His Disciples" (1862)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 18, 1998
Sometimes it takes outsiders to make people aware of treasures in their own city.Even longtime Baltimore museum-goers may not have known that 17 works of art by French painter Eugene Delacroix reside here. But four of them, three from the Walters Art Gallery and one from the Baltimore Museum of Art, are in the superb show "Delacroix: The Late Work" now at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.The show, celebrating the bicentennial of the artist's birth, contains more than 100 paintings and works on paper by Delacroix (1798-1863)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 18, 1998
Sometimes it takes outsiders to make people aware of treasures in their own city.Even longtime Baltimore museum-goers may not have known that 17 works of art by French painter Eugene Delacroix reside here. But four of them, three from the Walters Art Gallery and one from the Baltimore Museum of Art, are in the superb show "Delacroix: The Late Work" now at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.The show, celebrating the bicentennial of the artist's birth, contains more than 100 paintings and works on paper by Delacroix (1798-1863)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | September 10, 1998
Free fun in D.C.Celebrate the performing arts at the Kennedy Center's 14th annual Open House Arts Festival Sunday. Continuous, free entertainment for the whole family will be presented on 10 stages throughout the building and grounds.Besides a family concert by the National Symphony Orchestra, and solos and ensembles from the Washington Opera, the event features a variety of dance, gospel, jazz and world music. Various cultures will be showcased through demonstrations by folk dancers, drummers and storytellers.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 18, 1993
In Manet's lithograph "The Races," what first catches the eye is the burst of horses down the track toward the viewer, creating a dynamic impression of motion. But perhaps even more extraordinary are the energetic squiggles at the far right, which depict nothing specific but may express in abstract terms the sense of excitement felt in the crowd as the horses approach.This is one of almost 100 works in the Baltimore Museum of Art's just-opened exhibit, "Three Master Printmakers from the Nineteenth Century: Eugene Delacroix, Edouard Manet, Mary Cassatt."
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
Documents released this week as part of a battle in federal court to determine the ownership of a miniature Renoir landscape also provide intriguing glimpses into the life of Saidie A. May, a prolific art collector whose bequests helped the Baltimore Museum of Art build a world-class collection. The 1879 painting "Paysage Bords de Seine" was stolen from the Baltimore Museum of Art in 1951 and is now the subject of a dispute between the institution and a woman who says she bought it at a flea market decades later for $7. That painting was one of many family treasures May left to the museum or to friends and relatives before she died in 1951.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1995
The Maryland Institute, College of Art this week reasserted its claim that it alone may determine the future of thousands of prints, paintings and sculptures known as the Lucas Collection.In a response filed in Baltimore City Circuit Court, the institute rejected any attempts by the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Walters Art Gallery to block the sale of the artworks.Considered one of the most important art bequests made in Baltimore, the collection has been owned by the institute since 1910.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1996
After 18 months of legal posturing and private negotiations, three of the city's largest cultural institutions have reached an agreement about the future of the famous Lucas art collection:It will stay in Baltimore.But it took scores of billable lawyer hours and the combined efforts of a circuit court judge, the governor, the heads of three boards of trustees, at least two leaders of a charitable foundation and the president of a symphony to do it.Though the settlement has not yet been finalized, the state has agreed to pay $4.25 million over several years to the Maryland Institute, College of Art to ensure that the thousands of artworks will remain permanently in the city, according to sources familiar with the deal.
NEWS
By Francesca Chapman and Francesca Chapman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 8, 1998
PHILADELPHIA - "Delacroix: The Late Work," will be on display through Jan. 3 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art."Sex and violence" marks the work of the 19th-century French master, says Joseph J. Rishel, curator of the museumThe museum's display of 70 paintings and 40 drawings by Eugene Delacroix (1798-1863) has an ample helping of bosomy maidens in distress, big cats shredding their prey and Turks waving scimitars. That should help get you in the door.Once there, however, confronted with the vivid canvases - which also include tranquil seascapes, jewel-like still lifes and deeply felt biblical scenes - you can ponder the place of Delacroix in the evolution of art.Link between old and newThe museum's experts consider Delacroix the link between the last Old Masters and the first artists of the French Romantic movement.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | September 27, 1998
It is a scene of quiet after the roar of violence. The mob who stoned the saint to death is gone. Three people struggle to lift the lifeless body as a woman kneels and wipes blood from a step.One can imagine it on film, with only the sounds of the heavy breathing of those carrying the body and the slight scratching of cloth on stone. Although six people inhabit the picture, the silence and solitude of death permeate it.This little painting, "Saint Stephen Borne Away by His Disciples" (1862)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | September 10, 1998
Free fun in D.C.Celebrate the performing arts at the Kennedy Center's 14th annual Open House Arts Festival Sunday. Continuous, free entertainment for the whole family will be presented on 10 stages throughout the building and grounds.Besides a family concert by the National Symphony Orchestra, and solos and ensembles from the Washington Opera, the event features a variety of dance, gospel, jazz and world music. Various cultures will be showcased through demonstrations by folk dancers, drummers and storytellers.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1996
After 18 months of legal posturing and private negotiations, three of the city's largest cultural institutions have reached an agreement about the future of the famous Lucas art collection:It will stay in Baltimore.But it took scores of billable lawyer hours and the combined efforts of a circuit court judge, the governor, the heads of three boards of trustees, at least two leaders of a charitable foundation and the president of a symphony to do it.Though the settlement has not yet been finalized, the state has agreed to pay $4.25 million over several years to the Maryland Institute, College of Art to ensure that the thousands of artworks will remain permanently in the city, according to sources familiar with the deal.
NEWS
By HOLLY SELBY and HOLLY SELBY,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer John Dorsey contributed to this article | September 29, 1995
The future of an art collection considered one of Baltimore's greatest cultural treasures was put in doubt yesterday when a judge ruled that the Maryland Institute, College of Art may sell its vast Lucas Collection of printsbe for the institute to sell the collection -- a move intended to boost the school's endowment.Before any sale, he said, the court must decide how much money, if any, the institute owes the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Walters Art Gallery for housing and caring for the Lucas Collection over the past 60 years.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1995
The Maryland Institute, College of Art this week reasserted its claim that it alone may determine the future of thousands of prints, paintings and sculptures known as the Lucas Collection.In a response filed in Baltimore City Circuit Court, the institute rejected any attempts by the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Walters Art Gallery to block the sale of the artworks.Considered one of the most important art bequests made in Baltimore, the collection has been owned by the institute since 1910.
NEWS
By HOLLY SELBY and HOLLY SELBY,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer John Dorsey contributed to this article | September 29, 1995
The future of an art collection considered one of Baltimore's greatest cultural treasures was put in doubt yesterday when a judge ruled that the Maryland Institute, College of Art may sell its vast Lucas Collection of printsbe for the institute to sell the collection -- a move intended to boost the school's endowment.Before any sale, he said, the court must decide how much money, if any, the institute owes the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Walters Art Gallery for housing and caring for the Lucas Collection over the past 60 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | October 17, 1999
Like every other great composer, the life of Frederic Chopin has been travestied by Hollywood. But he's also the only composer who has escaped such treatment -- if only in a single movie. "Impromptu" (released in 1991 and available on video) brings Chopin and his circle of friends (including novelist George Sand, poet Alfred de Musset, painter Eugene Delacroix, pianist-composer Franz Liszt and the latter's ever-pregnant mistress, Marie d'Agoult) to uncanny life.Pulitzer Prize-winning stage director James Lapine ("Sunday in the Park with George")
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 18, 1993
In Manet's lithograph "The Races," what first catches the eye is the burst of horses down the track toward the viewer, creating a dynamic impression of motion. But perhaps even more extraordinary are the energetic squiggles at the far right, which depict nothing specific but may express in abstract terms the sense of excitement felt in the crowd as the horses approach.This is one of almost 100 works in the Baltimore Museum of Art's just-opened exhibit, "Three Master Printmakers from the Nineteenth Century: Eugene Delacroix, Edouard Manet, Mary Cassatt."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.