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By Lori Sears | February 6, 2003
Degas' fascination with ballet is universally known. And his realistic paintings of the Paris Opera dancers - practicing, posing and primping - adorn museums across the world. But you only have to go as far as the Philadelphia Museum of Art to find a comprehensive exhibition of 135 of his paintings, drawings, pastels and sculptures, alongside set models, costume designs and photographs of the dancers. The exhibit Degas and the Dance runs Wednesday through May 11 at the museum. The show's curators have identified many of the theaters and rehearsal rooms that Degas painted, and the figures in several works have been identified.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 10, 2008
Museum shows so often feel like mini-seminars in art history that you almost feel guilty when one comes along that lets you just enjoy spending an hour or so looking at a bunch of really interesting pictures. The exhibition of recent acquisitions that opened this weekend at the Phillips Collection in Washington is that kind of show, one where you don't have to pore over every label and wall text for fear of missing something important. You just stroll through and enjoy the sights along the way. On Exhibit Degas to Diebenkorn: The Phillips Collects runs through May 28 at the Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. in Northwest Washington.
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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 1998
Ballet dancers held a special magic for the French painter Edgar Degas, whose backstage portraits of the corps of the Paris Opera Ballet are among his most famous pieces.The Baltimore Museum of Art will feature more than 40 of Degas' oils, pastels, drawings and sculpture in its fall exhibit, "Degas and the Little Dancer," which will be on view from Oct. 4 to Jan. 3, 1999.Organized by the Joslyn Art Museum of Omaha, Neb., the show includes works from the BMA's collection as well as from the Louvre, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the PhiladelphiaMuseum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Art Institute of Chicago and others.
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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | February 18, 2006
Impressionism, that quaint 19th-century artistic innovation that is still the most universally beloved painting style in history, is back again in a lovely exhibition that opens today at the Phillips Collection in Washington. Degas, Sickert & Toulouse-Lautrec: London and Paris, 1870-1910 basically traces the influence of Impressionist master Edgar Degas, the "painter of dancers," on a generation of French and English artists who adopted similar themes and techniques in their work, partly as a result of their admiration for Degas' innovations, partly in response to the cultural mingling promoted by the Gilded Age's happy confluence of British big money and the French sense of style.
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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | February 18, 2006
Impressionism, that quaint 19th-century artistic innovation that is still the most universally beloved painting style in history, is back again in a lovely exhibition that opens today at the Phillips Collection in Washington. Degas, Sickert & Toulouse-Lautrec: London and Paris, 1870-1910 basically traces the influence of Impressionist master Edgar Degas, the "painter of dancers," on a generation of French and English artists who adopted similar themes and techniques in their work, partly as a result of their admiration for Degas' innovations, partly in response to the cultural mingling promoted by the Gilded Age's happy confluence of British big money and the French sense of style.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 11, 1998
To some, she is a masterpiece, extraordinarily modern yet reminiscent of ancient statuary. To others, she is an example of depravity, of criminality, of the ills of society.Perhaps never in the course of art history have so many seen so much in a single work of art. Even today debate continues, and to meet her is to know why.She is, of course, Edgar Degas' sculpture called "Little Dancer Aged Fourteen," and the Baltimore Museum of Art currently has on view the first exhibit devoted to an exploration of the work.
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By GLENN McNATT and GLENN McNATT,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1998
In Saturday's Today section, two photo captions with pictures showing ballet students incorrectly identified the school attended by the dancers. It is the Baltimore School for the Arts.* The Sun regrets the error.They are some of the hardest-working people on the planet. They undergo years of arduous training, endure terrific physical pain and keep coming back for more punishment.At their peak, they're all taut muscle and lightning-quick reflexes. They're so strong it's scary. And still they may never make it to the pros.
NEWS
By Bennard Perlman and Bennard Perlman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 1998
Degas and racing? The two seem incongruous for those who associate the artist with subjects such as ballet dancers, laundresses and women at the bath. But, as Washington's National Gallery of Art demonstrates with its current exhibition "Degas at the Races" (through July 12), Edgar Degas' interest in horse racing occupied a sizable portion of his productivity for nearly a half-century.One of the old saws regarding Degas is that he was a dandy who attended the races to gaze upon the spectators rather than the participants.
NEWS
By Amy Littlesugar | August 15, 1999
Editor's note: An awkward young ballerina inspires the formidable artist Edgar Degas to greatness as she poses for his statue 'The Little Dancer.'Monsieur Degas met Marie at the door. Gently, he took her fingers and led her to the modeling stand."Ma fille," he said, "the pastel is like the powder on a butterfly's wing ... and you are the butterfly!"Marie took a deep breath and climbed once more into the same pose."Look up," said Monsieur Degas."Higher. Higher! As though you wish to fly!"Marie tried.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | October 15, 1998
'Degas Family Day'Put your feet in first position for a family day focusing on "Degas and the Little Dancer" Sunday at the Baltimore Museum of Art.See the Ellicott City Ballet, Sankofa Dance Theater, Combined Youth Ensemble, the Kimberly Mackin Dance Company, Choregraphie Antique and students from the Peabody Preparatory perform. Keep your eye on the modeling ballerina and sketch her as she poses for budding artists. Hear period music from Degas' day and enjoy light refreshments. Ballet attire is encouraged, and dance troupes are welcome.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | February 6, 2003
Degas' fascination with ballet is universally known. And his realistic paintings of the Paris Opera dancers - practicing, posing and primping - adorn museums across the world. But you only have to go as far as the Philadelphia Museum of Art to find a comprehensive exhibition of 135 of his paintings, drawings, pastels and sculptures, alongside set models, costume designs and photographs of the dancers. The exhibit Degas and the Dance runs Wednesday through May 11 at the museum. The show's curators have identified many of the theaters and rehearsal rooms that Degas painted, and the figures in several works have been identified.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 10, 2000
Most people think of the museum as a place to look at art, without troubling themselves too much about how the art got there in the first place. Yet the truth is that most of the art on display in museums today is there only because someone has given it to an institution. Robert Tannahill of Detroit was one such public-spirited benefactor. An heir to a wealthy industrial family, he became a pivotal figure in introducing modern art to the United States during the first half of the 20th century.
NEWS
By Amy Littlesugar | August 15, 1999
Editor's note: An awkward young ballerina inspires the formidable artist Edgar Degas to greatness as she poses for his statue 'The Little Dancer.'Monsieur Degas met Marie at the door. Gently, he took her fingers and led her to the modeling stand."Ma fille," he said, "the pastel is like the powder on a butterfly's wing ... and you are the butterfly!"Marie took a deep breath and climbed once more into the same pose."Look up," said Monsieur Degas."Higher. Higher! As though you wish to fly!"Marie tried.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN REMESCH | December 31, 1998
Last dance with DegasThere are only four days left to take a rare and intimate look at French impressionist Edgar Degas' most famous subject - the world of ballet. "Degas and the Little Dancer," on view at the Baltimore Museum of Art through Sunday, features 45 paintings, sculptures, pastels and drawings by the artist. As always, admission is free on Thursdays, and tomorrow, New Year's Day, admission is half-price. The museum is on Art Museum Drive at North Charles and 31st streets. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and tomorrow, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
FEATURES
December 16, 1998
This is the season of "The Nutcracker" and your little ballerina may dream of dancing the role of Clara. Books to feed those dreams:* "Angelina Ballerina" by Katharine Holabird* "The Little Ballerina" by Katherine K. Ross* "I Wear My Tutu Everywhere" by Wendy C. Lewison* "Shoes of Satin, Ribbons of Silk: Tales From the Ballet" AntoniBarber, editor* "Little Ballerinas" by Ann Morris* "Lili at Ballet" by Rachel Isadora* "Degas & the Little Dancer" by Laurence...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | October 15, 1998
'Degas Family Day'Put your feet in first position for a family day focusing on "Degas and the Little Dancer" Sunday at the Baltimore Museum of Art.See the Ellicott City Ballet, Sankofa Dance Theater, Combined Youth Ensemble, the Kimberly Mackin Dance Company, Choregraphie Antique and students from the Peabody Preparatory perform. Keep your eye on the modeling ballerina and sketch her as she poses for budding artists. Hear period music from Degas' day and enjoy light refreshments. Ballet attire is encouraged, and dance troupes are welcome.
FEATURES
December 16, 1998
This is the season of "The Nutcracker" and your little ballerina may dream of dancing the role of Clara. Books to feed those dreams:* "Angelina Ballerina" by Katharine Holabird* "The Little Ballerina" by Katherine K. Ross* "I Wear My Tutu Everywhere" by Wendy C. Lewison* "Shoes of Satin, Ribbons of Silk: Tales From the Ballet" AntoniBarber, editor* "Little Ballerinas" by Ann Morris* "Lili at Ballet" by Rachel Isadora* "Degas & the Little Dancer" by Laurence...
NEWS
October 10, 1998
ART LOVERS will go to see the Baltimore Museum of Art's show based on Edgar Degas' statue, Little Dancer Aged Fourteen, for the many paintings and statues by the Impressionist master.Dance lovers will go for what it shows of the human body in this dance form and of the social phenomenon of ballet a century ago. (A way for hard-working slum girls to improve their own and their family's lives, not unlike some professional sports today.)Others will go because they couldn't get tickets to the nation's blockbuster art show of the season, an exhibition of paintings by Vincent van Gogh at the National Gallery of Art in Washington.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 11, 1998
To some, she is a masterpiece, extraordinarily modern yet reminiscent of ancient statuary. To others, she is an example of depravity, of criminality, of the ills of society.Perhaps never in the course of art history have so many seen so much in a single work of art. Even today debate continues, and to meet her is to know why.She is, of course, Edgar Degas' sculpture called "Little Dancer Aged Fourteen," and the Baltimore Museum of Art currently has on view the first exhibit devoted to an exploration of the work.
NEWS
October 10, 1998
ART LOVERS will go to see the Baltimore Museum of Art's show based on Edgar Degas' statue, Little Dancer Aged Fourteen, for the many paintings and statues by the Impressionist master.Dance lovers will go for what it shows of the human body in this dance form and of the social phenomenon of ballet a century ago. (A way for hard-working slum girls to improve their own and their family's lives, not unlike some professional sports today.)Others will go because they couldn't get tickets to the nation's blockbuster art show of the season, an exhibition of paintings by Vincent van Gogh at the National Gallery of Art in Washington.
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