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By a Sun Staff Writer | April 30, 1995
The Washington Times has filed suit against the now-defunct Columbia Daily Tribune for unpaid printing bills it says totals $57,572.Filed in Howard Circuit Court April 20, the suit also names as a defendant Columbia management consultant John K. Keller. He helped start the newspaper, which operated three months and ceased publication in January.The newspaper's founder, Edward G. Pickett, was not named in the suit, which contends that the paper failed to pay its printing bills and bounced checks worth hundreds of dollars from Oct. 10 to Jan. 31.Mr.
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NEWS
By Mary K. Tilghman, mtilghman@tribune.com | May 8, 2014
Towson area state and local officials have written to Baltimore County Public Schools Superintendent Dallas Dance asking for assurances that the Loch Raven Elementary School building will be saved - and Dance's chief of staff says plans call for renovation and an addition at the school. The 66-year-old school building hasn't welcomed elementary school students since 1982 but Dance last year proposed moving the children of Halstead Academy to a new school on the Loch Raven site. Local and community officials have continued to express fears about demolishing the 1948 school, which currently operates as a community center and is protected as a historic landmark.
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BUSINESS
November 20, 1990
Some remnants of Baltimore Federal Financial FSA fetched $52,000 for the federal government as furniture, fixtures and equipment of the defunct thrift were sold at auction yesterday. The auction took place at the savings and loan's old administration building at 500 N. Calvert St.The auction was part of the effort by the Federal Resolution Trust Corp. to sell property and assets that the government acquired when it took over Baltimore Federal in February 1989. The federal agency is still attempting to sell $42 million worth of real estate owned by the thrift, including two branch operations, according to RTC spokeswoman Kate Spears.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | February 25, 2014
In the face of education and community issues that stretch across traditional neighborhood lines, leaders in the Loch Raven area have joined forces to resurrect the dormant Loch Raven Community Council. "It's been defunct for a number of years," Councilman David Marks, who represents the area, said. "I wanted to bring it back because I think there's a real value in having the community organizations talking to one another. I also think there are some common issues that need to be addressed.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1994
Baltimore Comptroller Jacqueline McLean and her defunct travel business have been sued by an airline ticket clearinghouse, which claims it is still owed nearly $130,000.The suit is the latest legal trouble for the comptroller, who was indicted in February on charges of misconduct in office and felony theft, and is on indefinite leave of absence from her job. She has pleaded not guilty to the criminal charges; her trial is scheduled to begin June 8.The Virginia-based Airline Reporting Corp.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | February 10, 2009
The FBI confirmed yesterday that it is investigating claims of campaign finance fraud during Michael S. Steele's 2006 Senate bid, amid fresh questions about the propriety of campaign payments to his sister's defunct company. Steele's sister, Monica Turner, founded Brown Sugar Unlimited LLC in late 2003 as an investment company, according to State Department of Assessments and Taxation documents. She closed the business in March 2006. Federal election records show Steele's Senate campaign paid Brown Sugar more than $37,000 in 2007 for Web and catering services that were performed after the company had shut down.
NEWS
May 19, 2002
An article in last Sunday's editions of The Sun about the growth of golf courses in Howard County should have included a mention of two now-defunct courses that once operated in the county, Font Hill and Allview.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | March 19, 2009
Kurt Kroncke in Federal Hill has been reading about orbital collisions: "Will all the space junk orbiting planet Earth eventually form a ring around our planet?" It already has. Communications satellites and others, working and defunct, already form a ring 22,236 miles above the equator, orbiting once a day. Track them in real time at a way-cool NASA site. Google: "3D JTrack"
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | November 24, 2005
Enchanted Forest Ellicott City's defunct Enchanted Forest theme park is the subject of a new exhibition at Antreasian Gallery. Wendy Wallach's hand-painted photographs depict the park from about 10 years ago, while Briana Bainbridge's photographs show it in a more recent setting. The exhibit, Enchanted Forest, opens Wednesday and runs through Dec. 10 at Antreasian Gallery, 1111 W. 36th St. There will be a reception 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Dec. 2. Call 410-235-4420 or visit antreasiangallery.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2001
Oscar nominations will be announced soon, the second "Survivor" starts in a couple of weeks and Madonna just got married, but all Hollywood can talk about is a little soap opera called "All My Lakers." "AML," as its devoted fans call it, is the continuing story of a Zen master named Phil, and his struggle to keep his warring sons, "Shaq the Elder," and "Kobe the Kid," from tearing the Laker clan apart. This family feud, put aside last year in the interest of a championship, has bubbled over and gotten so big that the estimable Los Angeles Times, a corporate big brother to this newspaper, ran a review of the latest squabble on the front page one day last week.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
Working with Anne Arundel County schools, an independent foundation helped feed needy children and their families for more than five years. But that came to an abrupt halt a year ago, after a member of the Journey Foundation reviewing the organization's bank records saw that more than $3,700 was missing. Within months, the foundation was defunct, and one of its founders, then a teacher a Corkran Middle School in Glen Burnie, was charged with stealing from it. On June 11, a tearful Pamela Fowler pleaded guilty to felony theft from the foundation that was the brainchild of her and her brother, jazz musician Norman Evans, whose annual spring concerts raised thousands of dollars for Journey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Eighteen months ago, Baltimore post-punk heroes Double Dagger played its final show at the Ottobar. But the trio of Nolen Strals, Denny Bowen and Bruce Willen aren't finished celebrating the band's career. On April 20 - internationally known as Record Store Day, which falls on the third Saturday in April each year - Double Dagger will host a free record release party at Hampden's Atomic Books . The trio is releasing its final album, a hard-hitting EP called "333," along with a documentary called "If We Shout Loud Enough" that follows the band on its final tour.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
Hundreds of computers, monitors, pieces of office furniture and digital design tools were auctioned Tuesday in Timonium to raise money for creditors of defunct Big Huge Games and its Rhode Island parent company, 38 Studios LLC. Traces of a one-time creative environment remained on the fifth floor of a Timonium office building as people bid on hundreds of video games, game consoles, pingpong and pool tables, and stereo and audio equipment. "This was a great place to work," quipped Matt Greenberg, a Baltimore County resident who was looking to buy furniture.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Computers, desks, chairs and other office equipment and items that belonged to the now-defunct Big Huge Games, a Timonium-based video game maker, will be auctioned Tuesday as part of the company's Chapter 7 bankruptcy and liquidation. Big Huge Games was a part of 38 Studios LLC, a Providence, R.I.-based video game company owned by former professional baseball player Curt Schilling. The firm ran out of money and shut down in May, tossing hundreds of people out of work, including about 100 in Timonium.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
A Baltimore County Circuit Court judge has dismissed a $5 million lawsuit filed against the former president of Baltimore International College by the board of the defunct culinary school. The suit, a counterclaim, alleged that Roger Chylinski, who founded the college and served as its president from 1980 to 2010, misused more than $200,000 for personal meals, antiques and unapproved salary. But Judge John Phillip Miller issued a dismissal May 7 without a hearing or written explanation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2011
When Ron Griffin received a solicitation for Lyric Opera Baltimore a few weeks ago, he had some questions. The organization sounded a lot like the Baltimore Opera Company, which folded midseason in 2009 because of financial problems, leaving Griffin and many others holding worthless tickets. "It was an abrupt end, and it wasn't handled well," said Griffin, a property manager. He and his partner were subscribers and patrons of the old company for more than a dozen years. "I asked what kinds of changes had been made.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | October 21, 1993
Paris.--There is a curve in the progress of ideas and theories that goes from innovation to acceptance and influence, passing to peak, popularization, vulgarization and overextension, and then descending into caricature and collapse.This curve is evident today with respect to that clutch of ideas that produced the monetarism-free-market-deregularization theory dominating Western economic policy and public debate during the 1980s, known best as Reaganism-Thatcherism.Promulgated in the United States by the editorial page of the Wall Street Journal, and in England by several anti-orthodox think-tanks, based on ideas ranging from the monetarism of the University of Chicago economic school to the magical mystifications of the Laffer Curve and ideological libertarianism, it was welcomed by the businessmen to whom it told what they wanted to hear, and won the heart and mind of Ronald Reagan -- and, in its more rigorous version, of Margaret Thatcher as well.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | February 25, 2014
In the face of education and community issues that stretch across traditional neighborhood lines, leaders in the Loch Raven area have joined forces to resurrect the dormant Loch Raven Community Council. "It's been defunct for a number of years," Councilman David Marks, who represents the area, said. "I wanted to bring it back because I think there's a real value in having the community organizations talking to one another. I also think there are some common issues that need to be addressed.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2010
The bonding company for a defunct homebuilder is paying $460,000 to Maryland consumers who weren't refunded the deposits they'd made for new homes that were never built, the state attorney general's office said Tuesday. Arch Insurance Co. — the bonding company for Equity Homes — has handed the money over to the attorney general's Consumer Protection Division, which will handle the consumer claims. The Fairfax, Va.-based Equity Homes, which closed in 2008, was building in Prince George's and Montgomery counties, the state says.
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