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NEWS
By Paul Krugman | January 2, 2003
SOME FUZZY math: In the first 30 days of December 2000, according to Nexis, only six articles in major news sources contained both the word "deflation" and the phrase "United States"; none of those articles suggested that deflation in this country was a real possibility. In the same period last year, there were 292 hits; last month there were 566. Will deflation be even more on our minds a year from now? About five years ago, economists realized that monsters from the 1930s were once again walking the Earth: Japan, the world's second-largest economy, was trapped in a cycle of falling prices and rising unemployment.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
After covering baseball for years, I'm always reluctant to proclaim the sky is falling on a team or, as Orioles manager Buck Showalter likes to say, pull the dirt up around them. One of the beauties of the sport is its length and the importance of staying as consistent as possible through six months of play. A bad game, bad series, bad week easily can be wiped away by a well timed hot streak. But it really is hard to imagine the Orioles can rebound from this 1-3 series against a vulnerable Yankees team.
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NEWS
By PAUL GOLDMAN and ARTHUR MITZBURG | October 8, 1992
Richmond.--President Bush and his advisers brag that their economic policies have defeated inflation. The death of inflation is said to justify the so-called supply-side policies of the 1992 GOP platform. Well, it was Mr. Bush who originally used the term "voodoo" to describe his present economic policies, and we all know that reformed sinners tend to be the most obsessive in proclaiming their new righteousness. But hyperbole aside, if we listen to Washington policy makers discussing today's financial statistics, it is clear that they know something is happening but they do not know just what it is. Focusing on the wrong problem makes it impossible to develop the right solution.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
It was supposed to be both winter's last blast and Baltimore's first significant snowfall in two years, but stubbornly warm air took the "snow" out of Wednesday's snow day for many Marylanders. While weather forecasts had the region preparing for the worst - as much as a foot of heavy snow causing potentially hundreds of thousands of power outages - what it got was little more than a nasty day of slushy rain, though several inches of snow stuck north and west of the city. Yet heavy winds toppled a tractor-trailer on the Bay Bridge, shutting the span down in both directions for about four hours.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
A reader asks: Could you explain what is bad about deflation? I understand why inflation is bad, and I presume that deflation is the opposite of inflation. If so, why is it bad if my money is increasing in value rather than decreasing? The short answer is that deflation, like inflation, can kill demand and productive economic growth. Deflation is a persistent and broad decrease in prices. It arrives when there is too much supply, especially of capital goods, and too little demand. (The real estate market, with 11 months' supply of empty homes trying to get sold, is the primo example.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | May 11, 2003
DE ... DE ... de ... The Fed couldn't bring itself to name the beast. De ... de ... Declining inflation! Yeah, that's all the Fed's worried about. Doesn't sound so bad, does it? "If I say something which you understand fully, I probably made a mistake," Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan once said of his public augury. The Fed's statement that it was holding rates steady last week did not use the word "deflation," but this time its meaning seemed as plain as a $35 television. The central bank was declaring victory in the Thirty Years War against inflation and officially warning the populace about the blowback that sometimes accompanies the brutal suppression of an enemy.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2003
For generations, Americans have been riding inflation to a better life. They get a job, buy a house and, over time, accumulate wealth as wages and home values climb. But what if prices started going down - triggering deflation instead of inflation? A growing number of economists - even the Federal Reserve - are worrying about that possibility. Many don't expect it to happen, but for the first time in most people's memory, the prospect of deflation is a legitimate concern, experts say. "Nobody seems to object to a little bit of inflation.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan roiled financial markets yesterday by declaring that the threat of deflation is "no longer an issue" and that the economy seems to be strengthening on many fronts. Greenspan's brief but buoyant comments about the economy, during testimony at a Senate hearing, sent shivers through the stock and bond markets, as investors interpreted his words as additional evidence that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates before the end of the year.
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1998
Shoppers will see some lower prices on store shelves, and cheaper loan rates for cars and houses. But don't expect that to ignite a big burst of consumer spending, local experts said yesterday as yields on a benchmark long-term bond hit record lows.Bond prices surged yesterday as investors scarred by the Asian economic crisis continued their flight into high-quality holdings like U.S. government bonds. That sent yields on the key 30-year Treasury down to 5.74 percent -- the lowest level since 1977, when regular sales of that bond began.
BUSINESS
By Peter G. Gosselin and Peter G. Gosselin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 2003
WASHINGTON - Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan said yesterday that the United States' central bank is capable of fighting deflation, but he acknowledged that Fed policymakers have only scant knowledge of how a broad price decline would affect the U.S. economy. Greenspan made his comments in congressional testimony that appeared designed to provide a slightly more upbeat economic assessment than the Fed has offered in recent weeks. At one point, Greenspan told lawmakers that forecasts of a pickup in growth this year were "not unreasonable."
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | September 28, 2012
Rookie kicker Justin Tucker knew he wasn't going through the NFL season without a miss. So when the moment finally came Thursday night, he seemed far more philosophical than deflated. After all, he had made eight straight field goals in his fledgling career before pushing a 47-yard attempt wide right with 2:13 remaining in the third quarter and the Ravens leading 16-10 on their way to a 23-16 win over the Cleveland Browns. “I'm not about excuses,” he said of the miss. “I don't think anybody around here is. So what I'll do is look at the film, see if I did anything particularly different, look at it with Randy (Brown, the Ravens' kicking consultant)
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2012
The second most-abundant element in the universe is in short supply. Lighter than air and nonrenewable, helium is however quite rare on Earth, derived mostly from natural gas deposits. And recently it's grown scarcer. In the Baltimore area, some florists and party-supply businesses are scrambling to find new suppliers for the helium that floats their balloons. Most are paying more for supplies, while some have raised prices or temporarily turned customers away. Other industries are feeling deflated too; besides blowing up balloons and blimps, helium is used to eliminate oxygen in welding in the aerospace industry, to cool magnets in MRI scanners and to help deep-sea divers breathe a nitrogen-free mix of air. The supply-and-demand imbalance has become more acute recently in the United States, some experts say. The shortage results from cutbacks in global production combined with increased demand from industries such as health care and semiconductor manufacturing, experts said.
NEWS
By Steven C. Isberg | November 29, 2010
Is the beast of deflation crouching outside our door? Could this be the real reason behind the Federal Reserve's recent injection of $600 billion into the economy? Despite the logic of much of the criticism being aimed at the Fed, it may be doing what it has to do to keep the country from spiraling down into a deeper recession. In the midst of what amounts to a virtual economic war with some of our trading partners, it's important for us to understand exactly what is at risk and what the Fed is up to. First, the risk: Deflation is a chain of events in which consumer spending declines, prices fall, and business activity contracts.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg | kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | March 14, 2010
For a brief moment Saturday, the No. 10 Loyola Greyhound lacrosse program felt like the king of the world. Despite miserable weather, a huge crowd showed up to celebrate the opening of the Ridley Athletic Complex, the university's $62 million athletic facility. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Archbishop Edwin O'Brien were on hand for the stadium's dedication, and students and alums bellowed with excitement through the wind and rain as Loyola won the opening faceoff against No. 8 Duke.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 13, 2010
For a brief moment Saturday, the No. 10 Loyola Greyhound lacrosse program felt like the king of the world. Despite miserable weather, a huge crowd showed up to celebrate the opening of the Ridley Athletic Complex, the university's $62 million athletic facility. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Archbishop Edwin O'Brien were on hand for the stadium's dedication, and students and alums bellowed with excitement through the wind and rain as Loyola won the opening faceoff against No. 8 Duke.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | November 1, 2009
It's tempting to look back over the first six games of the season and wax nostalgic for the Ravens' defense of old, but it might make more sense to be grateful that coach John Harbaugh and offensive coordinator Cam Cameron seemed to realize from the outset that the offense had to take center stage. Nobody came right out and said that at the time, and nobody is going to admit that now. The company line held that defensive coordinator Greg Mattison would pick up right where Rex Ryan left off and there would be sufficient depth to overcome the loss of Bart Scott, Jim Leonard and - most likely - Samari Rolle.
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
We've all seen it: cheaper prices at the computer store, athletic-shoe emporium or gasoline pump. We probably don't think much about it, beyond congratulating ourselves for finding a good bargain. But some pundits and economists are speculating that these "bargains" are the leading edge of deflation, a general decline in prices for goods and services that can be just as ruinous as inflation.As is always true in economics, there's a lot of debate and no real agreement. Most economists believe that the U.S. economy is in pretty fair shape and that, if anything, we must remain vigilant about inflation -- a tendency toward rising prices that has been pretty much the norm since World War II. But there is a group, albeit a small one, whose members say sectors of the world economy show signs of harmful deflation.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
Economists worry about deflation - a persistent, broad decline in consumer prices that sometimes accompanies severe recessions. Deflation can lead to lower wages and other income, which makes it difficult to handle debt. Deflation can also accelerate a recession because consumers postpone buying, knowing prices will be lower next month. But fear not. A trip through the statistics shows that some costs continued to rise in December even as the overall consumer price index plunged. A few industries are still minting money.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,peter.schmuck@baltsun.com | July 31, 2009
News item: : The New York Times reported Thursday that Manny Ramirez and David Ortiz tested positive for illegal performance-enhancing drugs during Major League Baseball's supposedly anonymous survey testing in 2003, according to lawyers familiar with the results. My take: : OK, enough's enough. I know there is no way that MLB and the players union can justify outing the remaining 100 or so players who tested positive during the 2003 survey, but I think everybody has figured out by now that would be much better than having a couple of names leak out every six months, keeping the sport mired indefinitely in the six-year-old fallout from this tawdry scandal.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | July 17, 2009
Best wins Orioles 10, Yankees 5 (April 6): : With a sellout Opening Day crowd of 48,607 booing Mark Teixeira's every move, the Orioles pounded New York's new $161 million ace CC Sabathia for six earned runs and 13 base runners over just 4 1/3 innings. In his first game as an Oriole, Cesar Izturis connected for a two-run homer and Jeremy Guthrie turned in a quality start to out-duel Sabathia, his former Cleveland Indians teammate. Orioles 12, Blue Jays 10, 11 innings (May 27): : After being controlled for seven innings by Toronto ace Roy Halladay, the Orioles erased an 8-3 deficit by scoring five times in the eighth.
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