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By John E. McIntyre and The | August 7, 2013
At The Baltimore Sun we are scrupulous about referring to the Johns Hopkins University. That is not, as some may imagine, because we are truckling to the largest employer in the city (or to the likelihood that Baltimore will eventually change its name formally to Hopkins ). That is just how the name of the school is idiomatically rendered. That is how I heard Hopkins referred to years ago when I was an undergraduate out on the Michigan tundra. It was, however, social-climbing pretension when Ohio State University decided to style itself The Ohio State University and to insist that everyone else fall into line.* Hopkins aside, the use of the definite article with the names of colleges and universities is well established in idiom.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
A colleague has sent me an email recounting one of those interminable but sterile discussions that the Internet has enabled, this one about Ukraine vs. the Ukraine .  Let's get that out of the way first. The country calls itself Ukraine , which gives the preference a degree of authority. The Ukraine  is a relic of the time when it was a part of R ussia and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and Ukrainians are touchy, feeling that the definite article reduces them to the status of a region rather than an independent nation.  The preference in journalism for Ukraine over the Ukraine  dates from the time of the breakup of the Soviet Union and Ukrainian independence.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2012
On Twitter, @SherrieVossMatthews inquires about the use of articles with initialisms and acronyms.* An article at Daily Writing Tips summarizes the conventions: "Because acronyms like NASA are pronounced as words ('na-suh,' in this case), there's no need to precede them with the definite article: You wouldn't write 'Budget cutbacks hit the NASA hard.' (Though the is essential if NASA is used as an adjective, as in 'Budget cutbacks hit the NASA project hard.') "But initialisms require the : 'The FBI announced his capture several hours later.' That's because the term is pronounced letter by letter: “eff-bee-eye.” (The only usage that omits the definite article is in a headline: 'FBI Announces Suspect's Capture.')
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The | August 7, 2013
At The Baltimore Sun we are scrupulous about referring to the Johns Hopkins University. That is not, as some may imagine, because we are truckling to the largest employer in the city (or to the likelihood that Baltimore will eventually change its name formally to Hopkins ). That is just how the name of the school is idiomatically rendered. That is how I heard Hopkins referred to years ago when I was an undergraduate out on the Michigan tundra. It was, however, social-climbing pretension when Ohio State University decided to style itself The Ohio State University and to insist that everyone else fall into line.* Hopkins aside, the use of the definite article with the names of colleges and universities is well established in idiom.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
Item: I know that R.L.G. must be right at Johnson , because he says the same things about whom that I have been saying: In normal speech, who is used as subject and object; whom appears in formal speech and writing, and less frequently there. "Since whom  is becoming less common, many people can't use it properly even when they are aiming for Formal. (A common mistake is using it in a subject role, for example: That's the candidate whom I hope will win the election.  Here, the mistake is in thinking that  I hope turns  who  into an object.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
A colleague has sent me an email recounting one of those interminable but sterile discussions that the Internet has enabled, this one about Ukraine vs. the Ukraine .  Let's get that out of the way first. The country calls itself Ukraine , which gives the preference a degree of authority. The Ukraine  is a relic of the time when it was a part of R ussia and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and Ukrainians are touchy, feeling that the definite article reduces them to the status of a region rather than an independent nation.  The preference in journalism for Ukraine over the Ukraine  dates from the time of the breakup of the Soviet Union and Ukrainian independence.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
At the paragraph factory tonight we will be covering the outcome of the Iowa caucuses. Never mind that the winner of these caucuses does not necessarily do well in subsequent contests, or that no actual delegates to the Republican National Convention are selected, or that Iowans - no disrespect - are not particularly representative of the electorate. This hypertrophic straw poll is the first formal contest of the election year, and so it must be important. At The New Yorker George Packer observes sardonically , “Political journalism - unlike war reporting - long ago stopped being about what is true or important.
NEWS
August 29, 1991
Mayoral ChoiceEditor: Your apologetic endorsement for mayor just won't do. You can't, in good conscience, endorse an incompetent. Schmoke for judge, yes. For mayor, no.Education -- a shambles. City Jail -- a shambles and public disgrace. Public Works and business practices -- a shambles.Be fair: Du Burns and Bill Swisher did a better job with their city positions. Either would be an improvement as mayor.Kurt Schmoke is a pleasant, incompetent intellectual. Unfortunately, his choice of associates and managers leaves a lot to be desired.
NEWS
By George F. Will | October 4, 1990
WILD-EYED and wondering about its fate on the eve of ''Armageddon''(the Gramm-Rudman sequesters that, predictably, did not happen), Washington read a New York Times jeremiad about the coming chaos. Cuts in the weather service would mean the ''accuracy of weather forecasts might deteriorate.'' Gosh.But in the nick of time, the budgeteers nicked the deficit just enough to justify the real purpose of the exercise, another change of what are smilingly called the ''requirements'' of the Gramm-Rudman (more smiles)
FEATURES
By David Rakoff and David Rakoff,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 1, 1998
"The Woody," by Peter Lefcourt. Simon and Schuster. 318 pages. $23. From the misbegotten use of the definite article in the title, it seems that "The Woody" is a novel that suffers, like its protagonist, Senator Woodrow "Woody" Wilson White, from needless performance anxiety.Luckily enough, it's actually terrific. The very funny Peter Lefcourt (a man whose book "The Dreyfus Affair," about two gay major leaguers, taught me everything I know about baseball) has crafted a hilarious narrative about the Job-like trials of the erratically tumescent, completely unprincipled, borderline-vacuous, and ultimately strangely likable senator from Vermont, seeking re-election.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
Item: I know that R.L.G. must be right at Johnson , because he says the same things about whom that I have been saying: In normal speech, who is used as subject and object; whom appears in formal speech and writing, and less frequently there. "Since whom  is becoming less common, many people can't use it properly even when they are aiming for Formal. (A common mistake is using it in a subject role, for example: That's the candidate whom I hope will win the election.  Here, the mistake is in thinking that  I hope turns  who  into an object.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2012
On Twitter, @SherrieVossMatthews inquires about the use of articles with initialisms and acronyms.* An article at Daily Writing Tips summarizes the conventions: "Because acronyms like NASA are pronounced as words ('na-suh,' in this case), there's no need to precede them with the definite article: You wouldn't write 'Budget cutbacks hit the NASA hard.' (Though the is essential if NASA is used as an adjective, as in 'Budget cutbacks hit the NASA project hard.') "But initialisms require the : 'The FBI announced his capture several hours later.' That's because the term is pronounced letter by letter: “eff-bee-eye.” (The only usage that omits the definite article is in a headline: 'FBI Announces Suspect's Capture.')
NEWS
January 17, 2012
At the paragraph factory tonight we will be covering the outcome of the Iowa caucuses. Never mind that the winner of these caucuses does not necessarily do well in subsequent contests, or that no actual delegates to the Republican National Convention are selected, or that Iowans - no disrespect - are not particularly representative of the electorate. This hypertrophic straw poll is the first formal contest of the election year, and so it must be important. At The New Yorker George Packer observes sardonically , “Political journalism - unlike war reporting - long ago stopped being about what is true or important.
NEWS
August 29, 1991
Mayoral ChoiceEditor: Your apologetic endorsement for mayor just won't do. You can't, in good conscience, endorse an incompetent. Schmoke for judge, yes. For mayor, no.Education -- a shambles. City Jail -- a shambles and public disgrace. Public Works and business practices -- a shambles.Be fair: Du Burns and Bill Swisher did a better job with their city positions. Either would be an improvement as mayor.Kurt Schmoke is a pleasant, incompetent intellectual. Unfortunately, his choice of associates and managers leaves a lot to be desired.
NEWS
By DAN RADRICKS | January 9, 1995
The Bethesda-based World Future Society marked the new year with its most thought-provoking forecasts for 1995 and beyond, among them: "Virtual reality experiences may lead to personality afflictions that will send people to psychiatrists. People may forgo their 'real' identities for the perfect bodies created in the world of virtual reality." Life as Super Mario. I can't wait.Arnick on emissionsRegarding Maryland's new auto emissions test -- you know, the one that requires state employees to actually touch a guy's car -- Del. John Arnick says: "I've gotten more messages on this thing than any issue since I've been in political office."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 11, 1994
In Baltimore, at least in some circles, it's a high compliment to be compared to Raoul Middleman, especially if you're a 22-year-old artist having your first important show and Middleman was one of your instructors at the Maryland Institute. I'm guessing Tony Shore appreciated that I noticed Middleman's style -- like it was so hard -- throughout Shore's "Bawlmer Portraits" (acrylic on black velvet) at Gallery M, 1000 Hollins St. And just as soon as I made the comparison, Shore was pointing the way to a portrait of Middleman hanging in the rear of the gallery.
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