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Kevin Cowherd | April 29, 2013
Maybe you yawned when you heard the news. Or maybe you just shrugged when you heard about Jason Collins and said: "What's the big deal?" But it's a very big deal. First active male player in a major team sport to declare he's gay? In the macho world of the NBA, where a player like Tim Hardaway once hissed "I hate gay people" before the ensuing backlash had him backpedaling like a fighter trying to avoid another haymaker? Oh, it's a very big deal. Now Collins, a 34-year-old journeyman center for six teams over 12 seasons, comes out of the closet and makes history.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 7, 2013
What does it say about our society when the sports and national news headlines as well as social media are all saturated with reports of a professional athlete's sexual orientation ("NBA player Jason Collins coming out is a defining moment in sports," April 29)? Who really cares? What kind of people care about someone's choice of partners? I don't understand why anyone chooses to tell the world that they prefer one sex over the other. That is a personal choice and only people with too much time on their hands or an unnatural desire to know about everyone else's private business will feel the need to know this information.
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NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | September 26, 1994
I'm disappointed to learn that I blindly missed a defining moment in American history.This has come to my attention in the many gushing reviews of a new movie called "Quiz Show."The movie is loosely based on the true story of how a popular TV quiz show from the 1950s called "Twenty-One" was rigged to heighten suspense and boost ratings and profits.Most of the critics say the movie is of great significance because the quiz-show scandal marked the loss of our national innocence.Americans were supposedly stunned to discover that they couldn't believe everything they saw on their rabbit-eared TV sets.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | April 29, 2013
Maybe you yawned when you heard the news. Or maybe you just shrugged when you heard about Jason Collins and said: "What's the big deal?" But it's a very big deal. First active male player in a major team sport to declare he's gay? In the macho world of the NBA, where a player like Tim Hardaway once hissed "I hate gay people" before the ensuing backlash had him backpedaling like a fighter trying to avoid another haymaker? Oh, it's a very big deal. Now Collins, a 34-year-old journeyman center for six teams over 12 seasons, comes out of the closet and makes history.
NEWS
By DAN ROCRICKS | January 16, 1998
I heard a savvy guy from West Baltimore say: "What difference does this Larry Young thing really make to most people? Most people measure a politician by what they see and feel when they walk to the end of the front walk. 'What's the quality of life on my street?' That's it."But that's not it. That's not all there is. Even in this cynical, scandal-weary, get-mine-and-get-over society we're living in, we can't let go of things that keep a democracy healthy - integrity, honesty, fairness, wisdom, leadership.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Bob Dole invoked President Clinton's failed effort to overhaul the nation's health care system yesterday as the "defining moment" of his presidency, saying it symbolized Clinton's dedication to big and expensive government programs.Dole made his remarks on the eve of the anniversary of the president's speech to Congress announcing his ambitious -- and ultimately unsuccessful -- plan to guarantee health insurance for all Americans. The remarks came in Dole's weekly radio program.
NEWS
August 13, 2009
If, as appears likely, Attorney General Eric Holder goes ahead with the appointment of a special prosecutor to investigate CIA abuses in the interrogation of terrorist suspects, the move could prove a defining moment for the administration of President Barack Obama. Mr. Obama came into office promising to focus on the future, not the past, and he has repeatedly indicated his desire to avoid bitter partisan recriminations over the policies of his predecessor that might distract from his agenda.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | November 13, 2005
Charles "Butch" Troyer will always be known for one action. He shot a man who was going to hijack an airplane, fly it into the White House and kill then-President Richard M. Nixon. It happened 31 years ago. The hijacker, Samuel J. Byck, commandeered a Delta DC-9 on a chilly February morning. He never managed to get the plane off the runway at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, but he ended up shooting three people - killing two of them and seriously wounding the third. Byck was holding eight passengers hostage when Troyer somehow aimed a gun through an airplane window and fired four shots.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | June 7, 2009
A DVD event this big needed a whole subject line to describe it: Wood stock: 3 Days of Peace and Music The Director's Cut: The 40th Anniversary Ultimate Collector's Edition arrives Tuesday, and for once a box set lives up to the hype. It brings a new balance to our entire historical sense of Woodstock as a musical and sociopolitical event. It is, of course, amazing to see and hear nearly two additional hours of wildly diverse music that appear on a bonus disc. It includes a phenomenal Creedence Clearwater Revival set that captures the band's immediate, guttural drive and subterranean magic in classics such as "Born on the Bayou."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 18, 2000
WASHINGTON - In their final 90 minutes of prime time in a campaign with only three weeks remaining, Vice President Al Gore and Gov. George W. Bush offered Americans the essence of their candidacies with performances that were certain to delight their supporters. But if either hoped to change the fundamental dynamics of the campaign, he probably fell short. Although they provided the television networks with enough testy exchanges to make compelling sound bites for the news programs, there was no defining moment that might lift either candidate out of the political deadlock into which they have fallen in the past few weeks.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,mike.preston@baltsun.com | October 13, 2009
Head coaches are defined by certain times throughout their NFL careers, and the Ravens' John Harbaugh has reached that moment. The Ravens have lost two straight. They have an offense suffering from growing pains with no identity, and their best offensive player didn't catch a pass Sunday. A defense long considered to be one of the best every year has become vulnerable, and the Ravens are drawing nearly eight penalties a game, a sign of an undisciplined team. We're going to find out a lot about Harbaugh in the next couple of weeks because he never faced this kind of adversity a year ago, his rookie season.
NEWS
August 13, 2009
If, as appears likely, Attorney General Eric Holder goes ahead with the appointment of a special prosecutor to investigate CIA abuses in the interrogation of terrorist suspects, the move could prove a defining moment for the administration of President Barack Obama. Mr. Obama came into office promising to focus on the future, not the past, and he has repeatedly indicated his desire to avoid bitter partisan recriminations over the policies of his predecessor that might distract from his agenda.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | June 7, 2009
A DVD event this big needed a whole subject line to describe it: Wood stock: 3 Days of Peace and Music The Director's Cut: The 40th Anniversary Ultimate Collector's Edition arrives Tuesday, and for once a box set lives up to the hype. It brings a new balance to our entire historical sense of Woodstock as a musical and sociopolitical event. It is, of course, amazing to see and hear nearly two additional hours of wildly diverse music that appear on a bonus disc. It includes a phenomenal Creedence Clearwater Revival set that captures the band's immediate, guttural drive and subterranean magic in classics such as "Born on the Bayou."
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER and ANDREW RATNER,andrew.ratner@baltsun.com | October 21, 2008
Two weeks before Election Day and it's still hard to pinpoint "the moment." Modern presidential politics have often been defined by turning points in a campaign, typically when one candidate does or says something stupid. Or, if not stupid, at least something that reminds many voters of the misgivings they already harbor about the candidate. The examples have become legend. Michael Dukakis, attempting to show he wasn't soft on defense in 1988, rode in a tank for a PR event - and looked like Rocky the Flying Squirrel.
SPORTS
September 6, 2008
WHAT WENT RIGHT The Midshipmen rushed for 346 yards, led by Shun White's 128 yards on 13 carries. Jarod Bryant and Eric Kettani were just short of 100-yard nights, rushing for 94 and 92 yards, respectively. WHAT WENT WRONG Ball State found plenty of opportunities to move the ball against Navy's secondary, as quarterback Nate Davis threw for 326 yards and four touchdown passes. Wide receiver Dante Love caught nine passes for 165 yards. DEFINING MOMENT Bryant was stopped for no gain on fourth-and-one at the Ball State 3-yard line in the middle of the third quarter with Navy trailing 28-23.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | January 30, 2008
The teasers started weeks ago: 15-second commercials starring muscular athletes and an Under Armour shoe box with a mysterious red glow. Viewers can't see what's inside the box. The Baltimore sports apparel company is keeping that a secret until Sunday's Super Bowl. That's when Under Armour will air a 60-second commercial - costs this year are reported to be $2.7 million for 30 seconds - in the first quarter of the football game to unveil its new cross-training sneaker. The commercial, to run on the most-watched sporting event of the year, is just one piece of what will be the biggest - and riskiest - product launch ever for Under Armour Inc. The company, known as much for its marketing prowess as its sportswear, is spending heavily on a yearlong campaign to introduce the athletic shoe it has dubbed a performance trainer as a wedge into the mainstream athletic footwear market.
SPORTS
By [HEATHER A. DINICH] | October 15, 2006
A summary of Maryland's 28-26 victory over Virginia: What went right / / Maryland capitalized on Virginia's errors, namely a fumble that put the Terps on the 1-yard line, and a 16-yard punt that set up a scoring drive. What went wrong / / Maryland's defense again struggled to contain a mobile quarterback, as Jameel Sewell gained a total of 335 yards and was part of three touchdowns. Defining moment / / Maryland corner Josh Wilson's defense on receiver Kevin Ogletree prevented a tying two-point conversion with 2:37 left in the game.
NEWS
April 13, 2000
Western Maryland College will end its Defining Moment Campaign this year the same way it began the $40 million fund-raising effort in 1996 -- with a party. The celebration, "An Evening of Illumination," is free to the WMC community and begins at 9 p.m. tomorrow in front of Hoover Library. The Ward Memorial Arch and the buildings constructed or renovated during the campaign will be illuminated. The lighting of the arch will take place about 9: 30 p.m. Also, led by board of trustees Chairman James Melhorn and Defining Moment Chairman Martin K. P. Hill, participants can toast the campaign's success with cake and sparkling cider.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 19, 2008
Bobby Fischer, the iconoclastic genius who was one of the greatest chess players the world has ever seen, has died, a close family friend, Gardar Sverrisson, confirmed yesterday. He was 64 and died Thursday in a hospital in Reykjavik, Iceland. Fischer died of kidney failure after a long illness, Sverrisson told the Associated Press. Mr. Sverrisson, who lived in the same apartment building in Reykjavik as Mr. Fischer, said: "He was a close family friend, and we all miss him very much." Mr. Fischer, the most powerful American player in history, had moved to Iceland in 2005.
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