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NEWS
By Providence Journal-Bulletin | September 20, 1990
THE BUSH administration is beginning to look at major revisions in the way poverty is defined for purposes of federal benefits. The current system stems from a crude measure created by a civil servant in the early 1960s. She took the Agriculture Department's cheapest recommended food budget and multiplied it by three to arrive at a poverty line. . . .While many people defined as poor don't seem to receive nearly enough to make ends meet, the current method may in some cases overstate the extent of poverty.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Three Vietnam War veterans stood on the ramparts of Fort McHenry, gazed onto the Patapsco where British warships launched hundreds of rockets and mortar shells almost 200 years ago, and imagined the scene that unfolded during the Battle of Baltimore. "I know rain was pouring down, and with all the shooting and shelling for more than 24 hours, they had no idea if they were going to survive," said Chuck Gallinger, 69, of Oshkosh, Wis., who served in Southeast Asia in 1966. Gallinger and his friends - in town for a reunion of their unit, the 709th Maintenance Battalion of the 9th Infantry - had stopped for a taste of the Star-Spangled Spectacular, Baltimore's bicentennial celebration of its defense against the British and the writing of the national anthem.
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BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | April 8, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- With painted-on smiles and attitudes carefully checked at the door, leaders of Maryland's interior design industry toed the party line last month before a Senate committee.The statement came a day later, the House passed the bill.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
The proposal to classify Uber as a common carrier - as ordered yesterday by the state's chief public utility law judge but potentially up for consideration by the Maryland Public Service Commission in the next 30 days - is probably not the last word in Baltimore's ride wars. It simply reflects similar battles that have been raging elsewhere between traditional taxi services, utility regulators and technology-based companies like Uber that are providing an increasingly popular service.
BUSINESS
By John M. Moran and John M. Moran,The Hartford Courant | June 6, 2004
Misplaced your definition of defined benefit plans? Forgotten the meaning of mean return? Lost the language of limited liability? Then go to Investor Words.com, which delivers definitions of thousands of investment and financial terms. You can browse the dictionary alphabetically, search it by keyword or scan by subject for terms used in such fields as banking, brokerage, insurance and venture capital. If you're a dedicated investor, or just a curious beginner, you can also sign up for the Investor Words.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,Sun Reporter | April 6, 2008
Jennifer B. Bodine was in her last semester at Roland Park Country School, struggling academically as graduation loomed. She realized that she probably should have kept her mouth shut. This was the 1960s, when seniors there had a little-known tradition. Every spring, they chose a day to strip their school uniforms, set them ablaze in a trash can, and romp around, at times in their underwear, to celebrate impending freedom. "Why I mentioned this [at home], I'll never know," she said last week, shaking her head.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | March 14, 1996
If the afternoon frocks, ball gowns, dinner suits and smart hats idling in forgotten closets could talk, what stories they could tell. Not just about the women who wore them, but also about the designers who tailored them for their roles in society's limelight.Sibilant echoes of gossip, wit, scandal and celebration flutter among the elegant mannequins posed for "Hattie Carnegie American Style Defined," an exhibit now at the museum of New York's Fashion Institute of Technology. It is a sampling of clothes and accessories from the salon of the woman who dressed America's socialites and stars from the '20s to the '50s.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 20, 1997
What defines a city's musical identity is its clubs. It's not just a matter of taking a town's musical pulse; it has to do with expressing an attitude and defining a style.Maybe that's why the best-known clubs carry a cachet that goes well beyond whoever happens to be playing there at the moment. Think of CBGB's in New York, the Marquee in London, the Troubador in Los Angeles.Think of Hammerjacks.From its spot on South Howard Street beneath the Interstate 395 overpass, Hammerjacks has defined the Baltimore popular music scene for almost a dozen years.
NEWS
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 20, 1997
What defines a city's musical identity is its clubs. It's not just a matter of taking a town's musical pulse; it has to do with expressing an attitude and defining a style.Maybe that's why the best-known clubs carry a cachet that goes well beyond whoever happens to be playing there at the moment. Think of CBGB's in New York, the Marquee in London, the Troubador in Los Angeles.Think of Hammerjacks.From its spot on South Howard Street beneath the Interstate 395 overpass, Hammerjacks has defined the Baltimore popular music scene for almost a dozen years.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2001
Like everyone else, Mike Flanagan carries a moment, a flash that offers an indelible impression of Cal Ripken, his former teammate who grew to become, as Ripken's younger brother Bill liked to say, "the biggest man in the game." The moment was Aug. 9, 51 days after Ripken had formally announced his intention on June 19 to retire and less than two months before the schedule said it was time to leave. Ripken had just suffered an 0-for-4 game against the Kansas City Royals, a faceless performance within another anonymous loss of a fourth-place season, except it had ended Ripken's hitting streak at 16 games, one shy of his career high.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | March 28, 2014
When Cornell's lacrosse program was going through troubled times last fall and the early part of the winter, interim head coach Matt Kerwick's mind shot back to the summer of 2012. On June 25 that year, Kerwick pleaded guilty to a DWI charge in a Fairfax County, Va., court while he was an assistant at Georgetown. "Last year when I spoke with the team, I told them we all make mistakes," said Kerwick, who replaced Ben DeLuca in November 2013 after a hazing incident at Cornell. "I told them how I had learned so much from my mistake and it helped me grow as a person.
NEWS
February 26, 2014
I find it difficult to understand how those who laud Ray Rice's character can defend what happened in Atlantic City ( "Ravens' Rice knocked fiancee unconscious, police say," Feb. 20). Mr. Rice's actions define his character. Even if his fiancée was having a medical problem, you don't leave her lying in a hallway without rendering assistance or at least showing some concern. This lady was not a side of beef but the mother of Mr. Rice's child. I'd be very curious to see what Ravens coach John Harbaugh's logic would be if it were his daughter being pulled unconscious from an elevator by her fiancé as if this were a common occurrence.
NEWS
February 2, 2014
A week ago we faced the reality of a previously unimaginable tragedy. It was not unimaginable because of the scope of its violence, the premature taking of precious lives, or the shadow of fear cast over the hundreds of families enjoying the warm comfort of a community gathering space on a cold winter day. Tragedies like these are, sadly, all too real and all too common. What was, and what still is, unimaginable is that it could happen here; that it happened here. We are not the first and we certainly will not be the last community to confront such an unimaginable reality.
NEWS
September 16, 2013
Believe it or not, but Amtrak is the most energy-efficient form of motorized transportation available in the United States, according to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory report released this summer. Indeed, the comparison isn't really all that close, with passenger rail beating out the nation's cars, trucks and airlines handily. That fuel efficiency, and the fact that Amtrak and other forms of rail transportation also help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, don't often get the attention they deserve.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's cousin locked up a one-year contract for $65,400 to work as a project manager in Baltimore's Department of General Services last week. The city's spending panel — controlled by the mayor — approved the contract for Babila Lima on Wednesday without discussion. Rawlings-Blake abstained, but the city ethics policy doesn't recognize a cousin in its nepotism rules. The city's 118-page ethics code prohibits an elected official from employing a spouse, parent or stepparent, sibling or stepsibling, child, stepchild or foster child, mother-in-law or father-in-law, son-in-law or daughter-in-law, or grandparent or grandchild.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman embraced a message of change in proposing her first county budget Wednesday, describing the $1.3 billion operating budget as an effort to reverse a government that had fallen "way behind in culture, attitude and investment. " Neuman, who was appointed executive by the County Council in February to replace John R. Leopold after he was convicted in January of misconduct in office, told the packed council chamber, "We will not be defined by a past of scandal and mediocrity.
BUSINESS
By MarketWatch | December 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- More than 1 of every 3 workers at retirement age in the 2050s will have nothing saved in a 401(k)-style account, according to a government study released yesterday. On average, workers born in 1990 will save enough to replace about 22 percent of pre-retirement income, or $18,784 per year in 2007 dollars, according to the Government Accounting Office. "Today's workers will more likely struggle to make ends meet during retirement than previous generations," said Democratic Rep. George Miller of California, who had requested the report.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | August 20, 2006
For some of us, Dec. 26 was the emptiest day of the year. After weeks of anticipation, Christmas had finally arrived in a blaze of tinsel and plastic and wrapping paper. It was, for a child, the closest thing to paradise. The day after dawned like an afterthought. Dec. 26 always felt like the fairground after the fair, the ballroom after the ball. Reality had reasserted itself. You awoke from your happy daze to an insistent question: Now what? Something very similar will probably happen soon to the Cuban exile community.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | April 29, 2013
Maybe you yawned when you heard the news. Or maybe you just shrugged when you heard about Jason Collins and said: "What's the big deal?" But it's a very big deal. First active male player in a major team sport to declare he's gay? In the macho world of the NBA, where a player like Tim Hardaway once hissed "I hate gay people" before the ensuing backlash had him backpedaling like a fighter trying to avoid another haymaker? Oh, it's a very big deal. Now Collins, a 34-year-old journeyman center for six teams over 12 seasons, comes out of the closet and makes history.
SPORTS
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2013
If any questions lingered about Beyonce's ability to sing live - or her ability to make even the most crazed football fans momentarily forget about a game - then she answered them with force and grace during her Super Bowl halftime performance Sunday night. The fact that she achieved this on the world's most-watched stage is unsurprising, because she has long relished moments with the largest audiences. After controversy over her lip-syncing at President Barack Obama's second inauguration, she opened a news conference last week with an a cappella version of the national anthem - and told reporters that there'd be no lip-syncing for the Super Bowl . Her opening song, "Love on Top," quickly confirmed it. The set list that followed was varied and surprising.
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