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NEWS
April 8, 2011
Anyone who claims to be concerned about the deficit and doesn't want to raise taxes is either a fool or a fraud. William L. Akers
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NEWS
By Joe Burris | October 8, 2014
A state legislative auditing report found that Anne Arundel and Carroll community college were carrying several million-dollar, unrestricted-fund deficits in fiscal year 2013 related to future expenses for retiree benefits. The Office of Legislative Audits on Wednesday released the findings as part of a 10-page report for fiscal year 2013 from audits at 15 state community colleges. The report said AACC incurred a $13.9 million deficit in unrestricted funds, or money in a general fund that is not tied to a specific purpose.
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NEWS
October 28, 2013
Contrary to letter writer Robert C. Erlandson's claim, Democrats are not responsible for the current deficit and interest payments of the national debt ( "America needs more tea party 'extremists,'" Oct. 25). When President Bill Clinton left office there was a projected $5.6 trillion budget surplus. Thanks to his successor, George W. Bush, and his huge tax cuts (mainly for the wealthy), two unfunded, unnecessary wars and continued corporate welfare, the United States is now in worse shape than it has ever been.
NEWS
September 29, 2014
Why doesn't The Sun ask Gov. Martin O'Malley if taxing the businesses that left the state or did not locate here in the first place because of the high taxes had anything to do with declining tax revenue ( "The budget apocalypse that isn't," Sept. 26)? That will be the day! F. Cordell, Lutherville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
August 27, 2012
With Rep. Todd Akin of Missouri refusing to leave the race for the U.S. Senate seat, the distractions are guaranteed to keep coming ("Akin fights on, says he's 'standing on principle,'" Aug. 23). Despite his apologies and retraction, and despite Governor Mitt Romney's condemnation of the remarks, the focus for the next week will be on abortion. It doesn't matter that the Romney ticket has stated that they support abortion for victims of rape and incest, they will be lumped together with the more rabid anti-abortion faction of the Republican Party.
NEWS
November 18, 2011
In less than one week, this nation will remember the assassination of President John F. Kennedy exactly 48 years ago. It would serve the nation well if members of Congress would recall the immortal words President Kennedy spoke on Jan. 20, 1961: "Ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country. " Congress needs to restrain the spending and reel in this nation's debt. That would serve this country better than any other single item on the agenda of Congress or President Barack Obama.
NEWS
September 29, 2014
Why doesn't The Sun ask Gov. Martin O'Malley if taxing the businesses that left the state or did not locate here in the first place because of the high taxes had anything to do with declining tax revenue ( "The budget apocalypse that isn't," Sept. 26)? That will be the day! F. Cordell, Lutherville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
November 16, 2011
It is imperative that we raise revenue in addition to cutting waste in existing federal programs. The following three actions would wipe out our debt over a period of only a few years without having to cut Social Security, Medicare or Medicaid programs: 1. Raise federal income tax rates on those earning $500,000 or more per year. 2. Levy a small tax on every stock market transaction. 3. Deduct Social Security payments from everyone's payroll for the entire year with no maximum limit on how much would be deducted during the year.
NEWS
December 24, 2013
A reader recently expressed concern over the federal deficit and faults the Democrats for failing to come to grips with entitlements ("Republicans aren't to blame for Washington gridlock," Dec. 20). He describes the state of our federal budget as a free fall into bankruptcy. In my opinion, these views are sheer nonsense. If our economy were threatened, interests rates would be sky high and investors and foreign governments would be dumping our treasury notes. Instead, interest rates are at record low levels and investors worldwide are clambering to buy U.S. government securities.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow and Marc Freedman | January 12, 2010
A merica faces many deficits - in federal and state budgets, in trade, in business and, most assuredly, in personal finance. But there is one very large deficit that may underlie all of them. We face a "posterity deficit," born out of our growing failure to think about the well-being of future generations. Most people are not much concerned with what lies ahead for the world beyond their lifetimes. Yet, decisions we make today on questions like the environment and spending will have far-ranging implications on the lives of future generations - for better or worse.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
With just $40 in his pocket and the killing of two friends fresh in his mind, 13-year-old Leonardo Enrique Navas set off from El Salvador in July and traveled alone for 15 days on buses and taxis until he crossed the border into Texas. Every few days, he said, he called his mother in Maryland. That was the first part of his American journey. When school opens Tuesday, he will have his first day in a U.S. seventh-grade classroom, at Bates Middle School in Annapolis, after being reunited with a mother he had not seen for seven years.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
With three consecutive wins against the Texas Rangers, including Wednesday's come-from-behind, rain-soaked 6-4 victory, an obvious question has arisen. Manny Machado who? OK, maybe it's not really a burning sentiment at this point. But since the Orioles' Platinum Glove third baseman began serving his five-game suspension Monday -- leaving the Orioles roster short one player -- they haven't lost. “It's impressive, but it doesn't surprise me,” Orioles manager Buck Showalter said of his club's 3-0 record with 24 players.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 30, 2014
The alleged "raid" on the Republican senatorial primary in Mississippi, wherein black Democratic voters were said to have crossed over to vote for longtime incumbent Thad Cochran, has outraged his tea-party challengers. It sounds like a version of the old Dixie lament that "those people" should stay with their own kind. The real culprit is the Magnolia State itself, for holding an open primary law that allows voters to participate in a runoff regardless of party. And it's another reminder of the basic Republican problem of being branded as hostile or just unaccommodating to minority voters and their interests.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
TORONTO - Balls can fly when the roof of the Rogers Centre is closed, so the Orioles still had plenty of time Wednesday after they fell behind by five runs in the second inning against the Toronto Blue Jays. And designated hitter Nelson Cruz, who was signed by the Orioles early in spring training, powered the club to a 10-8 comeback win over the Toronto Blue Jays with his 11th career multihomer game, including a go-ahead grand slam that capped a six-run fifth inning. “It wasn't pretty, but we got it done,” Cruz said.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
St. Paul's star attackman Mikey Wynne painfully watched visiting McDonogh score three quick goals while he was serving a one-minute penalty for a high check on Friday. It gave the No. 2 Eagles a five-goal advantage and seemingly control of the game midway through the third quarter. Fortunately for Wynne, there was still time left to make amends. And did he ever. The All-Metro senior scored three of his game-high five goals and added an assist when the No. 5 Crusaders scored the game's final eight goals to come away with an improbable, 12-9 win over McDonogh in Brooklandville.
SPORTS
By Mike Frainie, For The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Archbishop Spalding wanted to make a statement in its MIAA A Conference opener at No. 1 Calvert Hall. When it was done, it was Jonathan Lane's arm that spoke the loudest. Lane, a senior, threw out Calvert Hall's Mike Finn at the plate following a pop-up to right field in the bottom of the seventh. The throw preserved a 4-4 tie before the No. 7 Cavaliers responded with a run in the top of the eighth to defeat Calvert Hall, 5-4, in the league opener for both teams. Spalding (8-0, 1-0)
NEWS
By Peter Morici | November 23, 2009
B igger than the budget deficit, America has a leadership gap. The economic recovery is not creating jobs; unemployment is rising; and the president and Congress offer little more than nostrums and platitudes. Republicans push tax cuts that experience teaches have doubtful prospects. Democrats, meanwhile, caution that "employment is a lagging indicator" - after a $759 billion stimulus has failed. It may be too early in the recovery for businesses to be hiring, but big layoffs should have stopped by now, and they have not. The huge trade deficit and reckless banking practices caused the Great Recession, and they still weigh down the economy.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
The Rawlings-Blake administration's efforts to slash Baltimore's long-term deficit has run into a bump - more than $100 million in new police, education and other expenses now expected over the next decade. The school system is billing the city for more students than expected - at a cost of several million dollars a year. The enrollment figures are wrong, school and city officials agree, but under state law, the city still has to pay a bill that could come to $43 million. Settlements of lawsuits against the Police Department and increased landfill costs are among other expenses that were not anticipated in the fiscal plan.
SPORTS
By Trevor Hass and The Sports Xchange | February 22, 2014
SYRACUSE, N.Y. - Maryland scored eight goals over a four-minute stretch in the second quarter, turning a two-goal deficit into a six-goal lead as the No. 11 Terps upset No. 2 Syracuse, 16-8, on Saturday in the teams' first - and last - regular-season meeting as Atlantic Coast Conference opponents. Many of the 5,283 inside the Carrier Dome watched in near-silence as the reigning national runner-up got demolished. Even Maryland coach John Tillman was "shocked" by the final score.
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