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Defibrillator

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HEALTH
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
For those waiting on surgery to place a defibrillator inside their chest, special vests can deliver lifesaving shocks in the event of a heart arrhythmia. But the downside, some say, is that the vests are so uncomfortable some patients don't wear them all the time. A team of undergraduate Johns Hopkins University students, led by an alumnus inventor, set out to build a new prototype defibrillator vest that is more comfortable and works more effectively. The result — a vest that has won competitions and might be headed for approved medical use. "Each aspect of this had to not only function correctly but we had to think of it separately, like, how do we make it convenient and comfortable for the patient?"
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HEALTH
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
For those waiting on surgery to place a defibrillator inside their chest, special vests can deliver lifesaving shocks in the event of a heart arrhythmia. But the downside, some say, is that the vests are so uncomfortable some patients don't wear them all the time. A team of undergraduate Johns Hopkins University students, led by an alumnus inventor, set out to build a new prototype defibrillator vest that is more comfortable and works more effectively. The result — a vest that has won competitions and might be headed for approved medical use. "Each aspect of this had to not only function correctly but we had to think of it separately, like, how do we make it convenient and comfortable for the patient?"
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NEWS
By SUN STAFF | November 4, 2005
Using magnetic resonance imaging to scan the heart wall, researchers at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine have found that patients with more than 25 percent scar tissue were nine times more likely than others to develop a fast and dangerous heart rhythm known as ventricular arrhythmia. In patients at risk for these arrhythmias, doctors often implant a heart defibrillator, a small device that delivers an electrical shock to restore cardiac rhythm in case the heart beats too rapidly to pump enough blood.
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Water? Check. Playbook? Check. AED? Check. When Baltimore area middle school coaches take their teams to a sporting event, they are increasingly adding some new equipment to the list of necessary supplies: automated external defibrillators. The devices are perhaps most frequently associated with helping people middle-aged and older in cardiac emergencies, but statistics show that sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death and is a major concern for young athletes, too. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, about 3,000 young people die every year from cardiac arrest.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | March 13, 2008
Electric shock is used to start hearts that have stopped beating. In a pinch, would it be possible to start a heart using a stun gun? Doctors use defibrillators to shock a heart out of a life-threatening rhythm. A stun gun is NO substitute for a defibrillator! We consulted two cardiologists who both said this would not work and is a very bad idea. If you are concerned about needing a defibrillator "in a pinch," you can purchase an AED (automated external defibrillator). These home models detect life-threatening heart rhythms and use an electrical shock to restart the heart.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2000
The last thing Jack Hubberman, 71, remembers is bending over to grab his luggage at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. His heart stopped. He collapsed. His wife, Jackie, screamed for help. US Airways flight attendant Judy Smith rushed over to help. When she learned that Hubberman had heart problems, she called for an automatic exterior defibrillator, tore open Hubberman's shirt and attached the machine's electrodes to his chest. She saved his life. "If they didn't have [the defibrillator]
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2000
Suspending reality for a moment, Deputy Sheriff Krystal Dietrich carefully placed the shock pads on the dummy as if she were trying to revive a person who just had a heart attack right there in the Anne Arundel County Courthouse law library. "Stand clear," she commanded one final time as she pushed the red button on the defibrillator - a small suitcase of medical technology that jump-starts the victim's heart. It worked, said Sgt. John Plantholt after he checked the plastic patient's pulse.
SPORTS
By Judy Foreman and Jackie MacMullan and Judy Foreman and Jackie MacMullan,The Boston Globe | May 8, 1993
BOSTON -- Boston Celtics captain Reggie Lewis is expected to undergo surgery, possibly this weekend, to have an implantable defibrillating device placed under the muscles of his abdomen, raising the possibility that he may play basketball again, The Boston Globe learned last night.Until last night, medical sources generally had assumed that Lewis would not play basketball again because of the serious heart arrhythmia that caused him to collapse and nearly lose consciousness during a playoff game April 29.But implantation of the defibrillator, which can quickly restore an erratic heart rhythm to normal, "raises the hope that he can play again," said one source close to the case.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 4, 2001
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration wants to reduce the Medicare reimbursement to hospitals when a patient receives a cardiac defibrillator - the device implanted in Vice President Dick Cheney's chest last weekend to control rapid heartbeats. The recommendation is included in a new federal rule, scheduled to take effect in October. Officials of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which oversee Medicare, say they concluded that hospitals have been overpaid for defibrillator procedures and that the new rate would cover the cost.
NEWS
By Diana Sugg and Tom Pelton and Diana Sugg and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2001
The pacemaker device Vice President Dick Cheney expects to have implanted today should stop any rapid heart rhythms that, if sustained long enough, could kill him. In a recent monitoring of his heart, physicians discovered some brief periods of rapid beating, a sign that Cheney could develop the life-threatening arrhythmias that lead to sudden cardiac death in 350,000 Americans every year. Cheney, 60, said he hasn't experienced the symptoms that a sustained irregular heart rhythm would generally produce - lightheadedness or fainting - and he described the device as a type of insurance.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
So many Americans experience dangerous fluctuations in heartbeat that about 400,000 times a year a device is implanted in their chests to keep a normal rhythm. But the defibrillators that send a life-saving electric buzz through the heart can be so painful and damaging that scientists have been looking for a better way. At the Johns Hopkins University, researchers believe that a mellow ray of light could someday replace the electricity. "We're using explosives to open a door for which we have no key," said Natalia Trayanova, a professor in Hopkins' department of biomedical engineering.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Heubeck, For The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
Annapolis resident Mike Greenhill is one of those rare guys who, even after he turned 50, could effortlessly sprint up and down a soccer field like he did as a much younger man. Until one evening last year, the 53-year-old took this ability for granted. Now, as Greenhill prepares to return to the game after an 11-month hiatus, he's happy to be alive. For this, he thanks a young woman whom he calls "his angel. " Last April Stephanie Andrews, a 22-year-old Howard County firefighter and emergency medical technician from Sykesville, agreed to play a soccer game on her friends' co-ed team because it was short a few players.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
A Baltimore abortion clinic whose license was suspended last week disputes that a patient suffered cardiac arrest at its facility, as the state contends. The administrator for the clinic, Associates in Ob/Gyn Care LLC on North Calvert Street, said in a letter dated March 8 to state health officials that the patient began having trouble breathing while recovering from an abortion and was taken to a local hospital, where she eventually died. The patient suffered from a fatal heart condition, may have had defective heart valves and was probably in heart failure, the administrator, Melissa Shachnovitz, wrote in the letter, which the clinic provided to The Baltimore Sun. The letter to Health Secretary Joshua M. Sharfstein came in response to the license suspension, which prohibits the clinic from performing surgical abortions.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
State health officials have suspended surgical abortion procedures at three clinics, including one in Baltimore where a patient suffered cardiac arrest and later died at a hospital. The physician who performed the abortion at Associates in OB/GYN Care LLC on North Calvert Street wasn't certified in CPR and a defibrillator at the facility did not work, state officials said in a letter Friday to the General Assembly. Although the cardiac arrest was caused by underlying health conditions and not the abortion, investigators found that it raised questions whether doctors at the clinic can handle an abortion that goes wrong.
SPORTS
By Connor Letourneau and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
It has taken 28 months, but former Virginia Techmen's basketball player Allan Chaney is finally poised to suit up for another Division I basketball program. The Baltimore native, who learned last August he would never be able to play for the Hokies because of concerns surrounding a heart condition, has committed to play for High Point University in North Carolina. “I appreciate everyone that has helped me through this process and I am hyped to play at High Point,” Chaney wrote The Baltimore Sun in an e-mail this morning.
NEWS
July 11, 2012
It would be cool if you could legislate medical effectiveness, but the expensive automated external defibrillators now required at Anne Arundel County pools already have been shown to not be effective at increasing survival rates after adult cardiac arrest. They should only be required at pools only after unequivocal evidence is found that they improve survival after drowning. Theodore Houk
NEWS
By Bruce Japsen and Bruce Japsen,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 18, 2005
Guidant Corp. issued a worldwide recall yesterday of more than 40,000 surgically implanted cardiac defibrillators because of potential malfunctions in the devices. It's the second major defibrillator recall this year. A Medtronic Corp. recall in February has resulted in new surgeries for more than 11,000 Americans who need the device to shock their heart back into a normal rhythm once it starts beating irregularly. The Guidant recall, however, caused mass confusion yesterday among patients and their doctors because the Indianapolis company and its sales representatives had been assuring them as recently as this week that it was not recommending replacement.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1996
Larry Ricketts' friends tease him about being "Robot Man" since the 33-year-old Taneytown man became the first person in the United States to be protected against a fatal heart attack by a new high-tech defibrillator.The defibrillator is more efficient than earlier models in delivering an electrical shock to return an erratically beating heart to regular rhythm.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the device April 30. Three weeks later, Dr. Michael R. Gold, director of the cardiac electrophysiology service at University of Maryland Medical Center, implanted one in Ricketts' chest.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
A bill requiring all public and semi-public swimming pools in Anne Arundel County to have automated external defibrillators was signed into law Friday by Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold. The law, called Connor's law for a 5-year-old boy who drowned in 2006 at the Crofton County Club pool, was passed Monday by the County Council. The pool had the equipment, but lifeguards didn't know how to use it, said the child's parents, Thomas Freed and Debbie Neagle-Freed. Since then, learning to use the devices is part of lifeguards' training, but not all pools have AEDs, they told the council.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
The Anne Arundel County Council is considering requiring pool operators to keep defibrillators among their safety equipment. "The most important job of government is to protect public health and safety, and this legislation is a common-sense solution to save lives," said Country Executive John R. Leopold, at whose request "Connor's Law" was introduced Monday. The bill named for Connor John-James Freed, a 5-year-old who drowned in Crofton in 2006. A lifeguard at the Crofton Country Club can be heard on the 911 recording saying that the pool had an automatic external defibrillator but she was not allowed to use it because she was not trained in its use. The Red Cross now requires training on the devices.
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