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NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | May 3, 2006
Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley took the debate over proposed electricity rate increases to court yesterday, following through on a promise to challenge the state's plan to defer a 72 percent spike in bills. In motions filed in Baltimore City Circuit Court yesterday, city officials requested judicial review of the deferral proposal -- which would phase in rate increases over 18 months -- and demanded that BGE delay an expected publicity campaign on the plan. The Public Service Commission approved the deferral plan last week and said BGE could begin enrolling customers this month, in advance of the July 1 rate spike.
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NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
Baltimore Gas and Electric advises customers seeking to defer the installation of smart meters in their homes to make a request in writing. Customers should address mail to Smart Meter Deferral, BGE, P.O. Box 1475, Baltimore, MD 21203. In the letter, BGE said, customers should include their name, address, account number, phone number and email address. Last week, the Maryland Public Service Commission issued an interim ruling allowing utility customers to defer installation of the new digital, wireless devices until regulators make a final decision on whether ratepayers can opt out. The state's three largest utilities — Baltimore Gas and Electric, Pepco and Delmarva — are in varying stages of replacing older meters with smart meters, which are intended to provide real-time data and help ratepayers monitor and control energy consumption.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
More than 400 Howard County homeowners have requested applications for the county's new property tax deferral program in what officials expect will be a popular way for the elderly, handicapped and low-income to put off their payments. In the five weeks since property tax bills containing notice of the program were mailed, the county has received 415 requests for applications, said Sharon Greisz, county finance director. Of those, 63 applications were submitted - all by senior citizens - and 43 have been approved so far, with an average deferral of $137.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
The Anne Arundel County Council has approved amendments to a bill that would allow developers to defer fees they pay to support water and sewer plant construction. The amendments include an increase in the deferral fee from 4 percent of the so-called "capital facility connection charges" to 8 percent. Other amendments reduced the immediate costs to the developers. "This just allows the people who need the assistance to get the assistance," said Robert Loomis, assistant director for public works.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams | June 30, 2007
Today marks the last day that Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customers can sign up for an optional plan to defer part of a 50 percent electric rate increase that took effect June 1. Customers who choose the deferral will pay about 18 percent less than full market rates from June until September and about 8 percent below market rates from September to December. Beginning in January, customers who chose the deferral start paying full rates. Those customers must start paying back the deferred amount starting April 1 and ending Dec. 31, 2009.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN COLUMNIST | April 26, 2006
It has been almost a week since Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Baltimore Gas and Electric announced their complicated plan to soften electric rate increases scheduled for July 1 - and people are still trying to figure it out. This is an attempt to shed more light and address questions that readers are asking via e-mail and phone. For those just tuning in, we're talking about a projected 72 percent increase - from $1,033 to $1,776 - in the average annual BGE electric bill. (The oft-quoted $67 a month figure for current bills is a median, not an average, which is somewhat higher.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | May 11, 2006
BGE must halt efforts to tell customers about an electricity rate deferral plan negotiated by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a Baltimore judge ruled yesterday, opening a path for arguments over whether the state should have gotten a better deal for 1.2 million ratepayers facing a 72 percent increase this summer. "It makes little sense ... to have the parties continue to issue public information which may or may not turn out to be accurate upon the conclusion of these proceedings," Baltimore Circuit Judge Albert J. Matricciani Jr. wrote after a hearing on a suit by the Baltimore mayor and City Council that seeks to force the Public Service Commission to reconsider the deferral proposal.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | July 2, 2006
The rate increase has arrived. Yesterday electricity prices for Baltimore Gas and Electric's 1.1 million residential customers rose enough to eventually make electric bills about 72 percent higher: But new credits were also put in place, which will keep the initial jump to about 15 percent under a multi-year phase-in plan put together by the legislature. The rise has made headlines for months, worked politicians into a lather and caused consumers no small amount of upset. Still, it's a topic that's jumbled in the minds of many.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2006
The city of Baltimore bolstered its attack on the Public Service Commission yesterday, accusing it of "massive regulatory failure" when it approved what the city says is a flawed BGE rate increase deferral plan without considering all the facts. The new filing in Baltimore Circuit Court came hours after the city won another preliminary victory as the Court of Special Appeals denied a request by the PSC and BGE to overturn a lower court ruling. City Solicitor Ralph Tyler argued in his new brief in Baltimore Circuit Court that the PSC failed to do its job in investigating the need for BGE's pending 72 percent increase for residential electric bills and that it violated its statutory requirements in approving the rate increase deferral plan.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | June 16, 2006
The General Assembly's plan to soften the blow of higher electricity bills provides the best savings for consumers of the three major plans that have emerged in the past few months, according to an analysis by several independent financial experts for The Sun. But the savings are slight. The average Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customer will pay a total of $13,993.45 for electricity over 10 years and 11 months repaying a rate increase deferred under the Assembly plan. A plan negotiated by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and approved by the Public Service Commission in April would have cost consumers an additional $268 over that period.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams | June 30, 2007
Today marks the last day that Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customers can sign up for an optional plan to defer part of a 50 percent electric rate increase that took effect June 1. Customers who choose the deferral will pay about 18 percent less than full market rates from June until September and about 8 percent below market rates from September to December. Beginning in January, customers who chose the deferral start paying full rates. Those customers must start paying back the deferred amount starting April 1 and ending Dec. 31, 2009.
BUSINESS
By Marilyn Geewax and Marilyn Geewax,Cox News Service | January 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Finance Committee voted yesterday to rein in the tax breaks that sweeten the huge compensation packages corporations often bestow upon executives. The crackdown was tucked into legislation to raise the federal minimum wage by $2.10 over two years to $7.25. In a unanimous voice vote, the committee approved the wage increase, along with a package of tax reductions and credits aimed at helping small businesses. In a surprise to many lobbyists who didn't see it coming, one provision was aimed at top executives of hundreds of large companies.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | July 2, 2006
The rate increase has arrived. Yesterday electricity prices for Baltimore Gas and Electric's 1.1 million residential customers rose enough to eventually make electric bills about 72 percent higher: But new credits were also put in place, which will keep the initial jump to about 15 percent under a multi-year phase-in plan put together by the legislature. The rise has made headlines for months, worked politicians into a lather and caused consumers no small amount of upset. Still, it's a topic that's jumbled in the minds of many.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | June 24, 2006
The General Assembly overrode Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s veto of a BGE rates bill yesterday, capping this summer's increase in electricity bills at 15 percent and firing the members of the Public Service Commission. But the vote might not bring an end to the issue that has dominated Maryland politics and sparked anger and confusion among BGE's more than 1 million residential customers. Ehrlich has questioned the legality of the Democratic-controlled Assembly firing all five PSC commissioners and said yesterday that he will encourage a lawsuit by the regulatory agency's chairman, Kenneth D. Schisler, a former Republican delegate appointed by the governor.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | June 16, 2006
The General Assembly's plan to soften the blow of higher electricity bills provides the best savings for consumers of the three major plans that have emerged in the past few months, according to an analysis by several independent financial experts for The Sun. But the savings are slight. The average Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customer will pay a total of $13,993.45 for electricity over 10 years and 11 months repaying a rate increase deferred under the Assembly plan. A plan negotiated by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and approved by the Public Service Commission in April would have cost consumers an additional $268 over that period.
NEWS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | June 14, 2006
A legislative proposal to partially defer a BGE electric rate increase for 11 months will allow the utility to recover its costs over a decade, but leaves unanswered questions about how much the utility and its customers will be paying once the clock runs out next year. Though negotiations continue, the plan should allow the company to avoid financial peril by requiring customers to repay the deferred amount - something BGE said was essential to avoid a legal challenge on constitutional grounds.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | May 19, 2006
Fresh off a preliminary legal victory, Mayor Martin O'Malley is trying to enlist other local government leaders to join his lawsuit against the state Public Service Commission over electricity rates set to rise 72 percent this summer. But while local leaders say they share concern over a PSC-approved deferral plan that seeks to blunt the impact of the cost spike, the mayor has found only limited success in getting others to join his legal battle. The city of Annapolis is considering joining Baltimore in its lawsuit, a move that Mayor Ellen O. Moyer said would help show the breadth of dissatisfaction with the pending BGE rate increase.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2006
BGE's parent company responded yesterday to top legislators' request for information about its finances and the cost of power that is driving the utility's pending 72 percent rate increase. Aides to the lawmakers said they were still reviewing the data and would have no immediate comment. The company released the data a day after it suffered a major loss in Baltimore Circuit Court, where a judge ruled that the Maryland Public Service Commission must hold new hearings on a rate deferral plan and must consider whether so large a rate increase is justified.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2006
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. announced yesterday that he will call a special session of the General Assembly to develop an electricity rate deferral plan because the alternative the Public Service Commission adopted last week is unacceptable. The governor's announcement came hours after the Assembly's Democratic leaders began informing lawmakers that they had agreed to convene a special session next week. Such sessions can be called by the governor or by a majority of the legislature. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said the PSC's response last week to a legal victory by the city of Baltimore - reinstating an earlier rate deferral plan that charged consumers 5 percent interest - was the last straw for the legislature.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2006
BGE's parent company responded yesterday to top legislators' request for information about its finances and the cost of power that is driving the utility's pending 72 percent rate increase. Aides to the lawmakers said they were still reviewing the data and would have no immediate comment. The company released the data a day after it suffered a major loss in Baltimore Circuit Court, where a judge ruled that the Maryland Public Service Commission must hold new hearings on a rate deferral plan and must consider whether so large a rate increase is justified.
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