Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDefense Spending
IN THE NEWS

Defense Spending

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | October 17, 1990
SAN DIEGO -- Even war on the horizon cannot stop the "de-Reaganizing" of the U.S. defense budget as it continues to recede from the hefty levels of the early and mid-1980s, defense electronics officials say.By the year 2000, defense spending will decline by one-third and dip even below pre-World War II levels in terms of share of the gross national product, the Electronic Industries Association said yesterday in an annual 10-year market forecast of the...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 27, 2014
In this current legislative season, the Maryland General Assembly had an opportunity to support proposed legislation which would establish a Futures Commission to help our state develop a strategy for dealing with potential military cuts. The Future Commission was based on best practices from the U.S. Department of Defense and as the state with the fourth greatest dependency on military spending, there are concerns that defense draw downs could potentially create difficult economic shocks for many workers and communities in Maryland.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 11, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Facing a tumultuous fall term that could have the government perched for months on the brink of shutting down, the Senate raced through its summer business yesterday hoping to begin a three-week recess after today.The senators moved last night toward approval of a $243 billion ** spending bill to finance the Pentagon next year. The bill, which is expected to pass this morning, represents a $1 billion increase over last year's defense spending and a $6.4 billion boost over what President Clinton had requested.
NEWS
By David S. Cloud and John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
The Army would shrink to its lowest troop levels since just before World War II under a budget proposed Monday by the Obama administration that seeks to downsize the Pentagon in ways that could have a significant impact on service members and contractors in Maryland. The proposed cuts reflect changing fortunes in the once-sacrosanct defense budget. Congress has ordered nearly $500 billion in defense spending cuts over the next decade, causing a harsh re-evaluation of military needs as the nation closes out the punishing ground wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 2, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, trying to make up for shortfalls that have left three Army divisions unready for battle and sparked criticism that the Pentagon budget had been cut too much, announced yesterday that he wants $27 billion more in defense spending.At a Rose Garden appearance, the president cited a congressionally mandated pay raise for the troops, and unexpected crises in Haiti, Cuba, Bosnia and the Persian Gulf, as the reasons for requesting the increase, which would come over the next six fiscal years.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 5, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration unveiled yesterday a $242.6 billion Pentagon budget for fiscal 1997 that calls for further cuts in defense spending, despite charges by critics that it is mortgaging future preparedness by paring money for modernizing weapons and equipment.The spending plan for the year beginning Oct. 1 would continue the long-range defense cuts that Mr. Clinton had been planning before congressional Republicans increased military spending in fiscal 1996 -- delaying any further growth, except to cover inflation, until after the year 2000.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 16, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Setting up an election-year confrontation with President Clinton, the House yesterday passed a $267 billion defense authorization bill loaded with such hot-button provisions as a revival of the ban on homosexuals in the military, a requirement to discharge HIV-infected service personnel and a prohibition on the sale of "sexually explicit" magazines at base stores.The White House said that Clinton would veto the bill unless it is toned down in the Senate.The bill, approved by a 272-153 vote that largely followed party lines, adds $13 billion to Clinton's budget request for the Defense Department, most of it for additional aircraft, ships, submarines, tanks and precision-guided munitions that the Pentagon says are not needed, at least not now.The Senate version of the bill, approved earlier this month by the Armed Services Committee, also authorizes $267 billion in spending, but it either rejects or ignores most of the controversial social issues contained in the House measure.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 15, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon next year could see the largest budget increase since the Reagan military buildup of the 1980s, with Republican leaders in Congress pressing to at least double the amount being considered by the Clinton administration.Both sides see the need to offer sharp increases over this year's budget to resolve what military chiefs see as "serious wear" on the armed forces, which face a rising number of overseas missions with aging equipment and inadequate pay and benefits.
NEWS
By Ben Cardin | March 21, 2011
These are difficult times for our economy, and Americans want Congress to act now to develop a credible budget plan that will ensure our nation's future growth and prosperity. It's not an easy task, but it is one around which all of us — Democrats, Republicans, independents — must come together as a nation if we are going to deal with our budget deficit. Recently, I gave a speech on the U.S. Senate floor outlining what I believe it will take to get control of our deficit while also ensuring our economic recovery and future prosperity.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Karen Hosler and Jonathan Weisman and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton formally asked Congress yesterday for more than $6 billion to pay for the air war over Yugoslavia, triggering what will likely be a divisive debate over defense spending and the combat readiness of a U.S. military that is deployed around the world.The budget request would finance the cost of the air war, pay for humanitarian relief and help shore up the delicate economies and political systems of neighboring countries in the Balkan region, from Albania to Bulgaria.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | October 8, 2013
Editor: The editorial " U.S. is us" published Oct. 4 urges our politicians to "...make deals to keep the government open," but ignores the deeper problem that we face, which is out of control spending by both political parties. The Democrats waste our tax dollars on welfare, unions, minorities and bigger government, giving us unsustainable trillion dollar deficits every year. Meanwhile, the Republicans waste our money on warfare, starting a disastrous war in Iraq and, now, in order to pander to the powerful pro-Israel lobby, are trying to start a more insane war in Iran.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
The Ravens came into Thursday night's preseason game knowing that their revamped defense would be challenged by an Atlanta Falcons offense that ranked sixth in scoring a season ago. The Falcons have a Pro Bowl quarterback in Matt Ryan and a pair of 1,000-yard wideouts in Julio Jones and Roddy White. They have also added running back Steven Jackson, who has had eight straight 1,000-yard seasons, in the hopes of bolstering their running attack and balancing an offense that is expected to be one of the NFL's best again this season.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Maryland is one of the states most "vulnerable" to sequestration cuts, given its dependence on federal spending, Wells Fargo said Monday. The financial services company's report, which underscores earlier warnings from economists, says non-defense spending makes up 10 percent of Maryland's gross domestic product — tied with Virginia and D.C. for the biggest share nationwide. Defense spending is nearly as large, at 9.8 percent, ranking the state third — and again tied with Virginia and D.C. — behind Hawaii and Alaska.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
Letter writer Steve Buff writes that military spending is bankrupting the country ("Military spending is bankrupting the country," Jan. 20). But according to the Congressional Budget Office, military spending doesn't appear to be the problem. The CBO says that federal receipts for fiscal 2012 are $2.5 trillion but that federal outlays are $3.6 trillion. That's a $1.1 trillion deficit. Of the $3.6 trillion being spent, 57 percent is for entitlements. Defense (of which military spending is but a part)
NEWS
By David Horsey | October 11, 2012
Mitt Romney may have won the first presidential debate, but what stuck in many people's minds was his threat to fire Big Bird. Apparently, Mr. Romney thinks America's debt problem can be fixed by picking up pennies along Sesame Street. Pressed to explain how he would balance the federal budget while cutting trillions of dollars in taxes, the allegedly masterful debater offered up just two specifics: He would repeal "Obamacare" (even though the Congressional Budget Office says the health care act actually reduces deficit spending)
NEWS
By Melvin A. Goodman | September 30, 2012
Over the past decade, the United States has engaged in the most significant increase in defense spending since the Korean War. Trillions of dollars have been allocated for the Pentagon, with little congressional monitoring or internal oversight. The defense budget for 2012 exceeds $600 billion, nearly equaling the combined defense spending of the rest of world. Every U.S. taxpayer spends twice as much for the cost of national defense as each British citizen; five times as much as each German; and six times as much as each Japanese.
NEWS
August 19, 2011
Dan Rodricks proposes to cut defense spending almost by half, but says he also wants our troops to have the technology they need. ("Austerity measures must apply to the Pentagon, too" Aug. 11). Like so many advocates of reckless defense cuts, he provides no specifics about how we could possibly accomplish these contradictory objectives. Defense spending didn't dig us into this hole and we shouldn't look to it to dig us out. Defense spending shrunk by more than half as a share of the budget since 1970, while spending on entitlements more than doubled.
NEWS
December 23, 2010
I disagree with the basic premise of The Sun's editorial of Dec. 23, "Budget sanity," that systemic relief from Maryland's budget deficit can only be achieved primarily through budget cuts. We hear over and over again that there isn't any money. That statement is false, particularly in Maryland, the wealthiest state in the nation. In addition, every state should receive much more funding back from the federal government, which could consist of funds from reductions in defense spending, increasing the federal gas tax by a few cents, and restoring the inheritance tax to its former levels on high-income estates.
NEWS
By Clayola Brown | August 27, 2012
Across America, manufacturing workers and their families are starting to hope again. Unemployment remains unacceptably high at 8.2 percent, but it has come down from 10 percent in October 2009. After the worst recession since the Great Depression, the U.S. economy has created 4 million jobs over the past two years. Working families have a message for Congress: Keep the fragile recovery alive. But unbelievably, Congress is on the verge of tacitly approving huge budget cuts that would send up to 1.5 million Americans back to the unemployment lines.
NEWS
May 10, 2012
There's a tendency among some to shorthand the ongoing federal budget debate as between Republicans who want to reduce government spending and Democrats who don't. This isn't really the case, as recent actions in the House have demonstrated. On Wednesday, the House Armed Services Committee took a close look at President Barack Obama's proposed $525.4 billion defense spending plan and decided that simply wasn't enough. The GOP-controlled committee voted to authorize nearly $4 billion more than what the Pentagon had requested for 2013.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.