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By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | July 17, 1992
The 285 court-appointed criminal defense lawyers who represent clients in U.S. District Court in Baltimore will have to wait until fall before their next pay from the federal government.The government suspended their pay last month when budgeted money ran out. The lawyers now must wait until the 1993 fiscal year arrives on Oct. 1."It's really an untenable position for lawyers to be in," complained Judith R. Catterton, president of the Maryland Criminal Defense Attorneys Association. "We're fundamentally being asked for a lengthy delay, and that's very burdensome for practitioners."
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Defense attorney Russell A. Neverdon Sr. filed Wednesday to run as a write-in candidate for Baltimore state's attorney after a city judge issued a ruling that kept his name off the ballot. The only name that will be presented to voters in the Nov. 4 election is that of Democratic nominee Marilyn Mosby, an insurance company attorney and former prosecutor. In a video posted to his Facebook page, Neverdon urged his supporters to continue backing his candidacy. "My name will not appear on the ballot, but I am a candidate for the office," he said.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 27, 2000
Two well-known Baltimore criminal defense lawyers were reprimanded by the state's highest court for letting an unsupervised secretary take charge of their personal injury cases and not giving a client her money, which resulted in the client's getting sued for a debt. The sanction against Warren Anthony Brown and Lawrence Barry Rosenberg, who were law partners from 1990 to 1993, is the mildest that the Court of Appeals can impose. The Attorney Grievance Commission had asked that their law licenses be suspended for a year.
NEWS
By Anne Colt Leitess | August 19, 2014
Editor's note: This article has been updated from an earlier version Criminal trials typically end once the jury returns its verdict. The attorneys move on to their next cases, unless appeal is pursued, and the debate ends. Unfortunately, that has not been the case after the recent trial of State v. Joseph Walker in Anne Arundel County. An Anne Arundel County grand jury indicted the defendant in this case for murder and other offenses after a Maryland State Police investigation revealed strong evidence that the defendant shot and killed an unarmed man during a road rage incident.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2010
After three days of pretrial motions, jury selection is set to begin Thursday in the trial of three men accused of killing former Baltimore City Council member Kenneth N. Harris. Charles McGaney and Gary Collins, both 22, and Jerome Williams, 17, face charges of first-degree murder, first-degree assault and various robbery and weapons counts in connection with the death of Harris outside a Northeast Baltimore jazz club Sept. 20, 2008. The pretrial motions did not go well for the defense.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2004
Maryland U.S. Attorney Thomas M. DiBiagio wanted a political corruption case when he started investigating investment manager Nathan A. Chapman Jr. and used embarrassing personal information, false promises and the threat of a related criminal investigation to try to reach that goal, Chapman's attorneys said in a court document filed yesterday. The trial of Chapman - who is accused of defrauding the state pension system and stealing from his own companies - has "lifted a veil of secrecy that had kept the United States Attorney's pattern of questionable behavior hidden from the defendant and the public," the lawyers wrote.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2002
John M. Rusnak, the former Allfirst Financial Inc. currency trader who lost $691.2 million, could face a tough battle in winning a light sentence if convicted, legal experts said yesterday. Rusnak, 37, who is at the center of one of the largest bank scandals in history, was indicted on seven counts of bank fraud Wednesday. If convicted on all counts, he faces a maximum of 30 years in prison and a $1 million fine for each count. None of the legal experts thinks Rusnak would receive the maximum sentence.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Baltimore City Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown will decide whether a jury can see a police surveillance video that prosecutors say ties twin brothers Travers and Tremayne Johnson to a pit bull that was set on fire in 2009. The second trial in the animal cruelty case opened Friday with a series of requests by the brothers' defense attorneys for Brown to throw out key pieces of the prosecution's evidence, including the video and a gas can. Brown held off ruling on the motions until at least Monday, when the trial continues.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Prosecutors and defense lawyers rested their cases Tuesday in the retrial of two brothers accused of dousing a pit bull with an accelerant and lighting her on fire, with jurors poised to begin deliberating Wednesday afternoon. Prosecutors called their last of eight witnesses before lunch Tuesday, questioning a state Department of Juvenile Services staff member who said in brief testimony that one of the defendants, Travers Johnson, was not on house arrest at the time the dog was burned.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2012
Even as prosecutors weigh an appeal of a Howard County judge's decision to throw out drunken-driving charges and rule that they were tied to illegal citation quotas, defense lawyers are considering whether the same defense might apply to past or current cases. District Court Judge Sue-Ellen Hantman's ruling in a case against an Ellicott City woman has raised questions on both sides - as well as eyebrows around the legal community. Leonard Stamm, a Prince George's County lawyer who wrote a legal handbook called "Maryland DUI Law," said the case puts lawyers who defend people charged with drunken driving on notice for a potential avenue for defense.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
A Towson woman will forfeit a building on Joppa Road where police say she ran a house of prostitution, but a deal struck with federal prosecutors allows her to keep five other properties in Baltimore. Di Zhang, 43, will also pay $325,000 as part of a settlement of a federal civil forfeiture case over property connected to her alleged prostitution and human-trafficking activities, according to documents filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. Zhang still faces criminal charges in Baltimore County Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
Five men found guilty of murder walked free Thursday from a Baltimore court after a series of emotional hearings that saw a man break down on the witness stand as he urged a judge not to release a prisoner convicted decades ago in the killing of his father. Twenty-five prisoners have now struck deals with the Baltimore state's attorney's office after a Maryland Court of Appeals ruling last year called into question the fairness of jury convictions before 1980. Defense lawyers estimate that 200 cases statewide could be affected.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
Attorneys for Pfc. Bradley Manning opened their defense of the Army analyst Monday by portraying him as a computer whiz operating under loose guidelines whose decision to leak reams of classified documents was based on a well-intentioned sense of idealism. As Manning's court-martial at Fort Meade entered its sixth week, his defense team also filed a series of motions asking the military judge to dismiss the most serious charges against him — including that he aided the enemy by providing diplomatic cables, war logs and combat videos to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
Robert Jarrett Jr. was convicted Tuesday of murdering his wife, following a trial in which prosecutors described him as a "cold-blooded killer" who allowed his sons to walk over her body buried beneath their backyard shed for two decades. Howard County jurors handed down a guilty verdict on one count of second-degree murder after deliberating into the night, bringing an end to a years-long investigation. Prosecutors, who had pushed for a first-degree murder conviction, said they would seek the maximum penalty of 30 years in prison at Jarrett's sentencing, scheduled in August.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
The Orioles' team doctor, William H. Goldiner, tended to orange-clad ballplayers at the same time as he diagnosed thousands of blue-collar workers with asbestos-related illnesses whose cases were taken up by prominent lawyer and team owner Peter G. Angelos. Angelos' firm is seeking to revive thousands of dormant asbestos cases, but some of the underlying diagnoses are facing new scrutiny from defense lawyers. They say Goldiner's dual roles call the integrity of his work into question - a contention he says is "insulting and absolutely false.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
Lawyers on both sides of the Phylicia Barnes murder trial acknowledged the circumstantial evidence against Michael Maurice Johnson in closing arguments Monday. But while defense attorneys described flaws and inconsistencies, prosecutors said the facts point to Johnson as the only reasonable suspect. "It's not one thing," Assistant State's Attorney Lisa Goldberg told jurors. "It's everything. " Jurors began deliberating on those details in the 10th day of the trial, despite a second attempt from defense attorneys to get an early acquittal.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 2, 2006
BOSTON -- It is the stuff that courtroom dramas are made of: the gotcha moment when a lawyer confronts a witness on the stand with evidence that the witness is lying. Maybe the lawyer discovered that the witness had been out of town the day he supposedly saw the crime or learned that the witness had told different stories. "I do it in almost every case," said James L. Sultan, who has represented several high-profile defendants in Boston. "That's what we do as criminal defense lawyers."
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | April 21, 2009
Defense lawyers for Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon reinforced their arguments Monday that the 12 criminal offenses against the mayor should be dropped, with her lawyers insisting that four perjury charges are based on "a fundamental misreading" of the city's ethics code. The arguments contained in court filings offered a preview of what defense lawyers could spend time discussing Thursday, when they are scheduled to make an oral presentation in Baltimore Circuit Court on their motion to dismiss all charges.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Baltimore prosecutors said Friday that a sexually charged video depicting teenager Phylicia Barnes and the man accused of killing her shows a turning point in the relationship that ultimately led to her death. Assistant State's Attorney Lisa Goldberg also said in opening statements that a witness will testify that defendant Michael Maurice Johnson showed him Barnes' body after she died, in a plea for help. Defense lawyers said that witness is unreliable and shows that the state has a weak case.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
George Huguely V, the former University of Virginia lacrosse player convicted last year of drunkenly beating to death his girlfriend Yeardley Love, has asked the Virginia Court of Appeals to review his case. Huguely's attorneys argued in a petition filed Tuesday that the court violated Huguely's constitutional rights. Love, the victim, was from Cockeysville. "The circuit court's response to the intense media interest was to rush through the trial, rather than to ensure that the accused received a fair trial," Craig S. Cooley and Paul D. Clement, the attorneys, wrote in the petition.
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