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By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2012
Harry Dutton Grunwell, a retired Army warrant officer with a talent for linguistics and computers, died Dec. 5 at Howard County General Hospital from complications of multiple sclerosis. The Marriottsville resident was 66. Mr. Grunwell was born in Ogden, Pa., the son of Paul and Bernice Grunwell. He graduated in 1963 from Chichester High School in Pennsylvania, where he was class president his last two years. In his senior year, Mr. Grunwell was voted "most talented" for his skill at the piano and "most dependable," said Norman Guarinello, who became friends with Mr. Grunwell in sixth grade when they competed against each other in sports.
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NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2012
Harry Dutton Grunwell, a retired Army warrant officer with a talent for linguistics and computers, died Dec. 5 at Howard County General Hospital from complications of multiple sclerosis. The Marriottsville resident was 66. Mr. Grunwell was born in Ogden, Pa., the son of Paul and Bernice Grunwell. He graduated in 1963 from Chichester High School in Pennsylvania, where he was class president his last two years. In his senior year, Mr. Grunwell was voted "most talented" for his skill at the piano and "most dependable," said Norman Guarinello, who became friends with Mr. Grunwell in sixth grade when they competed against each other in sports.
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NEWS
November 3, 2004
Harold Don Gipson, a retired voice language analyst, died of heart failure Friday at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis. The Arnold resident was 59. Mr. Gipson was born and raised in Houston and attended Abilene Christian University. He was a 1967 graduate of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center in Monterey, Calif. Mr. Gipson served in the Navy as a petty officer from 1966 to 1987, and was a voice language analyst for the Defense Department from 1987 until his death.
NEWS
June 29, 2005
William Harry Jenkins, a retired National Security Agency executive and cryptographer, died of cancer Friday at Chesapeake Hospice House in Linthicum. The Millersville resident was 73. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Brooklyn section, he was a 1948 graduate of City College and served in the Army. He earned a pre-law degree from the University of Maryland, College Park and in 1953 graduated with a diploma in Russian language studies from the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, Calif.
NEWS
August 6, 2003
Wiley Wilson White III, former director of an independent living program for emotionally disturbed youths, died of cancer July 29 at his Guilford home. He was 56. Born in Birmingham, Ala., and raised in the Philippines and Florida, he enlisted in the Navy in 1967 and studied the Indonesian language at the Defense Language Institute at Monterey, Calif. After his discharge from the military, he earned a history degree at the University of Florida in Gainesville, where he took graduate courses in special education.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1998
Chronically short of cash. Marriage a wreck. Ordered by a court to send most of his meager Army pay to his former wife and their two children. Mad at the world.David Sheldon Boone fit the profile. Like other accused spies before him, a shambles of a personal life apparently led Boone in 1988 to begin selling secrets -- in this case, top secret National Security Agency documents -- to a Soviet KGB spy named "Igor," according to the FBI and the U.S. attorney's office in Alexandria, Va.Ten years later, Boone, still broke and angry, met an FBI special agent posing as a Russian spy who asked if Boone wanted to resume spying.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 13, 1992
MONTEREY, Calif. -- A week ago, only nine people in the U.S armed services could say "hello" -- or anything else -- in Somali.Today, thanks to the military's language center in Monterey, thousands of U.S. soldiers carry hip-sized survival guides to such key phrases as "Don't shoot [me]," and "Where are the minefields?"It's all the result of an extraordinary effort from the Defense Language Institute, the military's premier language school. Its directors have been working day and night since the first hint of U.S. involvement in Somalia to get language materials to soldiers on the ground.
NEWS
December 31, 2005
Peter D. Molan, a Middle East scholar and linguist, died Wednesday of complications from open-heart surgery performed this month at Sinai Hospital. The Tuscany-Canterbury resident was 64. Born in Chicago, he earned a bachelor's degree in political science from Northwestern University in 1963. He joined the Army and studied at the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, Calif., where he learned Arabic and graduated with honors. He spent two years as a senior Arabic linguist in Asmara, Ethiopia, doing military intelligence work.
NEWS
May 12, 1991
* Richard P. Wilcox, son of Marie A. McLaughlin of Westminster, has joined the U.S. Army and become eligible to receive the Army college fund benefit of up to $17,000 for college expenses.He enlisted under the Army's Delayed Entry Program.Wilcox will report for basic training at Fort Jackson, S.C., in July. After completing this training, he will remain at the same post to attend advanced training to become a unit supply specialist.Heis a 1990 graduate of Westminster High School.* Two relatives ofCarroll countians recently returned from deployment to the Middle East in support of Operation Desert Storm.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | July 1, 1994
In 1940, there were 4,000 blacks enlisted in the Navy, and most of them served food.Times have changed. Today, there are 78,000 enlisted black men and women serving in every phase of naval operations and 3,100 black officers.And, since 1971, when Samuel Gravely Jr., the first black ever to command a warship was elevated to the rank of admiral, 15 blacks have made it to the Navy's top ranks.The Banneker-Douglass Museum in Annapolis is offering an exhibition that highlights the achievements of this extraordinary fraternity of 15."
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1999
MONTEREY, Calif. -- When Romy Hall enlisted in the Air Force last summer, they asked her if she had any special interests. She checked off the "linguistics" box on the form.Later, she took a test and scored high enough to be offered the chance to come here: to a hill overlooking the fishing wharves and rolling dunes of this West Coast tourist destination, to a school unlike any other.The place where spies learn the languages of the world's hot spots.For more than 50 years the Defense Language Institute and its predecessors have trained military intelligence officers.
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