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By Dan Berger | December 1, 1995
If Pat Gillick is so good, he ought to be put in charge of the city school system.Don't knock psychics on the Defense Intelligence Agency payroll. They divined where to find federal funding.The National Football League wants, among other goodies, special protection from Congress against being tackled in court by its own owners, right?B4Bill Clinton for President of Northern Ireland!
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
The Pentagon is creating a new intelligence service aimed at gathering information on terrorist networks, weapons of mass destruction and other emerging concerns, a senior defense official said Monday. The new Defense Clandestine Service will draw several hundred officers from the existing Defense Intelligence Agency, according to the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly about the classified program. The officers - some military, some civilian - will work alongside CIA counterparts in places such as Africa, whereal-Qaida has grown more active, and Asia, where Chinese military expansion and North Korean and Iranian weapons ambitions are drawing increasing U.S. concern.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The search for soldiers still listed as missing in action from the Vietnam War is being expanded to Czechoslovakia and the files of other East European countries as a result of information from a high-level Czech military defector, who has told Senate investigators that U.S. POWs spent time in Czech hospitals before being sent to the former Soviet Union.According to a confidential memorandum prepared for the Senate Select Committee on POW-MIA Affairs, a former Czech general who now works for the Defense Intelligence Agency has said that before his 1968 defection, he saw intelligence reports on at least two groups of POWs, each numbering about 25 men, who passed through Czech hospitals en route to Soviet imprisonment.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Tribune Newspapers | September 21, 2009
WASHINGTON - -The CIA is deploying teams of spies, analysts and paramilitary operatives to Afghanistan, part of a broad intelligence "surge" that will make its station there among the largest in the agency's history, U.S. officials say. When complete, the CIA's presence in the country is expected to rival the size of its huge stations in Iraq and Vietnam at the height of those wars. Precise numbers are classified, but one U.S. official said the agency already has nearly 700 employees in Afghanistan.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A company whose chairman was President Ronald Reagan's defense secretary teamed up with a Canadian arms dealer and some enterprising officials in the former Soviet republic of Belarus in a most unusual arms deal, financed in secret by the Pentagon.The deal came to light when the sun rose on Monday morning on a huge Russian-made transport plane parked within sight of an interstate highway in Huntsville, Ala.Its cargo: components of the S-300, the Russian equivalent of the Patriot missile defense system.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Mark Mazzetti and Greg Miller and Mark Mazzetti,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 29, 2005
WASHINGTON - The head of the Defense Intelligence Agency testified yesterday that North Korea now has the ability to arm a missile with a nuclear device, marking the first time a U.S. intelligence official has publicly said that Pyongyang had crossed that critical technological threshold. But other U.S. intelligence officials said they could not confirm Vice Adm. Lowell Jacoby's remarks, and the Defense Intelligence Agency subsequently issued a statement saying that Jacoby was merely "reiterating" previous testimony.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Tom Bowman and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 30, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In an effort to boost the nation's security, the Pentagon spent millions of dollars on an intelligence unit at Fort Meade that employed officers claiming psychic powers.After functioning 17 years under the Defense Intelligence Agency, the program was transferred in July to the CIA, which now wants to kill it.Under the Fort Meade program, the psychics were secluded on the base and were asked, according to a former director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, to "divine -- or whatever the process is -- where things were, or information of interest."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - Contacts between Iraqi intelligence agents and Osama bin Laden when he was in Sudan in the mid-1990s were part of a broad effort by Baghdad to work with organizations opposing the Saudi ruling family, according to a newly disclosed document obtained by the Americans in Iraq. U.S. officials described the document as an internal report by the Iraqi intelligence service detailing attempts to seek cooperation with several Saudi opposition groups, including bin Laden's organization, before al-Qaida had become a full-fledged terrorist organization.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon is paying $340,000 a month to the Iraqi political organization led by Ahmad Chalabi, a member of the interim Iraqi government who has close ties to the Bush administration, for "intelligence collection" about Iraq, according to Defense Department officials. The classified program, run by the Defense Intelligence Agency since summer 2002, continues a longstanding partnership between the Pentagon and the organization, the Iraqi National Congress, even as the group jockeys for power in a future government.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | July 3, 2008
FREDERICK - A military unit that has tracked diseases threatening U.S. forces overseas for more than a half-century will now assess infections that could endanger civilians at home, too, officials announced yesterday at a dedication ceremony. Renamed the National Center for Medical Intelligence, the agency will gather information on diseases and contaminants that could make their way into the United States through food, animals, travelers, immigrants and returning troops. It will work in close partnership with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which also looks for infectious agents entering the country at border crossings, officials said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | July 3, 2008
FREDERICK - A military unit that has tracked diseases threatening U.S. forces overseas for more than a half-century will now assess infections that could endanger civilians at home, too, officials announced yesterday at a dedication ceremony. Renamed the National Center for Medical Intelligence, the agency will gather information on diseases and contaminants that could make their way into the United States through food, animals, travelers, immigrants and returning troops. It will work in close partnership with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which also looks for infectious agents entering the country at border crossings, officials said.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | May 23, 2008
Last year's embarrassing leak of spy-budget details gave insight into just how lucrative the business of federal contracting has become since the 2001 terrorist attacks and the 2003 start of the Iraq war. At a Colorado conference sponsored by the Defense Intelligence Agency, a PowerPoint slide revealed that 70 percent of intelligence dollars go not to government employees or agencies, but to private companies such as SAIC and Booz Allen Hamilton....
NEWS
By David Wood and Siobhan Gorman and David Wood and Siobhan Gorman,Sun Reporters | February 3, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In the bleakest assessment yet of the worsening war in Iraq, a new U.S. intelligence analysis said that "key elements" of the conflict have reached the level of civil war and cast doubt on the ability of either the United States or the Iraqis to achieve the reconciliation needed to stabilize the country in the near future. The new National Intelligence Estimate, released yesterday by the office of the director of national intelligence, spurred fresh calls in Congress for a change in U.S. strategy and prompted an acknowledgement from the White House that "there is no assurance of success" in Iraq.
NEWS
By GREG MILLER and GREG MILLER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 8, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Senior officials with the Defense Intelligence Agency took the rare step yesterday of describing the service's intelligence-gathering operations in the United States in an effort to counter concerns by privacy advocates that it could abuse new spying authority being considered by Congress. Existing laws have prevented DIA officers from approaching U.S. residents - including recent arrivals from Iraq and other nations in the Middle East - who might have valuable information on developments in their home countries, the officials said.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Mark Mazzetti and Greg Miller and Mark Mazzetti,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 29, 2005
WASHINGTON - The head of the Defense Intelligence Agency testified yesterday that North Korea now has the ability to arm a missile with a nuclear device, marking the first time a U.S. intelligence official has publicly said that Pyongyang had crossed that critical technological threshold. But other U.S. intelligence officials said they could not confirm Vice Adm. Lowell Jacoby's remarks, and the Defense Intelligence Agency subsequently issued a statement saying that Jacoby was merely "reiterating" previous testimony.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 27, 2004
would immediately grant more power to the director of central intelligence, designating him to fill much of the role envisioned for a future national intelligence director, according to senior government officials who have been briefed on the plan. The order, to be issued as soon as this weekend, would be cast as an interim measure intended as a first step toward putting into effect recommendations of the Sept. 11 commission, whose call for a new, more powerful national intelligence chief would require congressional legislation.
NEWS
By McClatchy News Service | August 4, 1992
MOSCOW -- A Russian official says he has received death threats for helping in the effort to locate American servicemen held illegally in the former Soviet Union since World War II.The official, who asked that his name not be made public, said yesterday he and members of his family have received anonymous telephone calls warning him to stop cooperating with the joint U.S.-Russian Commission on POW/MIAs.The Senate Select Committee on POW/MIA Affairs plans hearings today on reports of Americans missing in Southeast Asia.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - The United States launched many more failed airstrikes on a far broader array of senior Iraqi leaders during the early days of the war last year than has previously been acknowledged, and some caused significant civilian casualties, according to senior military and intelligence officials. Only a few of the 50 airstrikes have been described publicly. All were unsuccessful, and many, including the two well-known raids on Saddam Hussein and his sons, appear to have been undercut by poor intelligence, current and former government officials said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - Contacts between Iraqi intelligence agents and Osama bin Laden when he was in Sudan in the mid-1990s were part of a broad effort by Baghdad to work with organizations opposing the Saudi ruling family, according to a newly disclosed document obtained by the Americans in Iraq. U.S. officials described the document as an internal report by the Iraqi intelligence service detailing attempts to seek cooperation with several Saudi opposition groups, including bin Laden's organization, before al-Qaida had become a full-fledged terrorist organization.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - The United States launched many more failed airstrikes on a far broader array of senior Iraqi leaders during the early days of the war last year than has previously been acknowledged, and some caused significant civilian casualties, according to senior military and intelligence officials. Only a few of the 50 airstrikes have been described publicly. All were unsuccessful, and many, including the two well-known raids on Saddam Hussein and his sons, appear to have been undercut by poor intelligence, current and former government officials said.
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