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By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Mark Matthews and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 18, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The United States ordered weapons and equipment sent to the Persian Gulf yesterday and put U.S.-based forces on increased readiness for deployment in response to "unusual" Iraqi troop movements directed toward Kuwait."
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NEWS
By Tribune Washington Bureau | December 20, 2008
WASHINGTON - President-elect Barack Obama has selected retired Navy Adm. Dennis C. Blair to serve as the nation's next intelligence director but has not concluded his search for someone to lead the CIA, according to government officials familiar with the selection process. Blair's nomination would make him Obama's point person on an array of highly charged intelligence issues the incoming administration will inherit from President George W. Bush. Among them are the allocation of resources amid two wars, the operation of secret CIA prisons overseas, and the wiretapping of e-mail and calls that pass through the United States.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | October 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Faced with an impending federal probe of alleged discrimination, the head of the country's largest spy agency told a congressional panel yesterday that he would redouble efforts to hire and promote women and minorities."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - More than a year before the Sept. 11 attacks, a small, highly classified military intelligence unit identified Mohammed Atta and three other future hijackers as likely members of an al-Qaida cell operating in the United States, according to a former defense intelligence official and a Republican member of Congress. In the summer of 2000, the team, known as "Able Danger," prepared a chart that included visa photographs of the four men and recommended to the military's Special Operations Command that the information be shared with the FBI, Rep. Curt Weldon of Pennsylvania and the former intelligence official said yesterday.
NEWS
By Newsday | February 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon's official claims of destruction of Iraqi tanks, artillery and armored vehicles inside Kuwait are at least three times greater than the estimates from U.S. intelligence agencies, a U.S. official who has reviewed the intelligence figures said yesterday."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - More than a year before the Sept. 11 attacks, a small, highly classified military intelligence unit identified Mohammed Atta and three other future hijackers as likely members of an al-Qaida cell operating in the United States, according to a former defense intelligence official and a Republican member of Congress. In the summer of 2000, the team, known as "Able Danger," prepared a chart that included visa photographs of the four men and recommended to the military's Special Operations Command that the information be shared with the FBI, Rep. Curt Weldon of Pennsylvania and the former intelligence official said yesterday.
NEWS
January 24, 1992
In the breakdown of the Communist world, new information -- or what purports to be -- keeps coming out. New leads demand investigation. New rays of hope dangle before those who never gave up the thought that of 2,267 U.S. servicemen listed as missing in action (MIA) in Vietnam up to 1973, some might walk out, or their remains be identified.Respectful follow-up is needed for the new information presented to the Senate select committee investigating the issue, chaired by Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts and Sen. Robert Smith of New Hampshire.
NEWS
By Michael Wines and Michael Wines,New York Times News Service | June 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf complained to Congress yesterday about the quality and timeliness of intelligence given his forces during the Persian Gulf war.The general was especially critical of the analyses of intelligence provided to his staff by specialists in Washington on the Iraqi military, saying that they had been "caveated, footnoted and watered down" to the point of being useless."
NEWS
By Bill Gertz | September 15, 2002
WASHINGTON -- The key failure of U.S. intelligence before Sept. 11 was the lack of human intelligence -- spies on the ground who could have learned the plans and intentions of al-Qaida before it attacked. The intelligence bureaucracy that was formed after Pearl Harbor to prevent another surprise attack is focused too much on electronic spying through communications intercepts and satellite photography. Spying on terrorist groups was farmed out to friendly foreign intelligence services, whose interests may not always coincide with U.S. interests.
NEWS
By Tribune Washington Bureau | December 20, 2008
WASHINGTON - President-elect Barack Obama has selected retired Navy Adm. Dennis C. Blair to serve as the nation's next intelligence director but has not concluded his search for someone to lead the CIA, according to government officials familiar with the selection process. Blair's nomination would make him Obama's point person on an array of highly charged intelligence issues the incoming administration will inherit from President George W. Bush. Among them are the allocation of resources amid two wars, the operation of secret CIA prisons overseas, and the wiretapping of e-mail and calls that pass through the United States.
NEWS
By Rick Pearson and Rick Pearson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 28, 2004
MIAMI - Buffeted by Democratic criticism that he has not moved quickly enough on the recommendations of the bipartisan Sept. 11 commission, President Bush issued several executive orders yesterday aimed at strengthening intelligence-gathering and concentrating authority under the director of central intelligence. The White House described the orders as a first step toward a national intelligence director, which was recommended by the panel created to investigate shortcomings in intelligence surrounding the Sept.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - Nearly 20 months after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, U.S. intelligence agencies will embark on a new era of information sharing today, government officials hope, with the opening of a terrorism threat center at the CIA. The center - housed at the CIA's headquarters - will open its doors to more than 50 counterterrorism analysts from the CIA, FBI, National Security Agency and defense intelligence agencies. Their mandate is to improve collaboration, pool information and prevent another attack.
NEWS
By Bill Gertz | September 15, 2002
WASHINGTON -- The key failure of U.S. intelligence before Sept. 11 was the lack of human intelligence -- spies on the ground who could have learned the plans and intentions of al-Qaida before it attacked. The intelligence bureaucracy that was formed after Pearl Harbor to prevent another surprise attack is focused too much on electronic spying through communications intercepts and satellite photography. Spying on terrorist groups was farmed out to friendly foreign intelligence services, whose interests may not always coincide with U.S. interests.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 11, 2002
MOSCOW - Russia's intelligence agency said yesterday that it had broken a U.S. spy ring that was trying to steal Russian defense secrets, including information about the country's military ties with former Soviet republics. The allegation adds to a list of ruffled relations between the two countries weeks before President Bush is scheduled to arrive in Russia for his first visit. President Vladimir V. Putin's decision to support the American-led war against terror had strengthened U.S.-Russia ties, but disagreements over nuclear disarmament and trade are expected to top the agenda at next month's summit.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Burdened by a bloated and expensive work force, the National Security Agency and other U.S. intelligence services must make deeper cuts in personnel and invest in new technology or their mission could be "seriously jeopardized," a federal commission said yesterday.NSA, which eavesdrops on foreign communications and is Maryland's largest employer with about 20,000 workers at Fort Meade, and the nation's two other spy agencies have been ordered by Congress to reduce their civilian personnel 24 percent by 2001.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Mark Matthews and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 18, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The United States ordered weapons and equipment sent to the Persian Gulf yesterday and put U.S.-based forces on increased readiness for deployment in response to "unusual" Iraqi troop movements directed toward Kuwait."
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | February 18, 1991
Paris.If the Senate Intelligence Committee has its way, the Senate will in the spring vote the most important reform of the U.S. intelligence establishment since the Central Intelligence Agency was created in 1947.Under proposals to be introduced by the majority and minority leaders of the committee, David L. Boren (D.-Okla.) and Frank H. Murkowski (R.-Alaska), a new top intelligence executive would be named, serving outside and above the existing agencies, setting goals for them. He or she would be expected to coordinate and supervise the intelligence assessments made by CIA, Defense Intelligence Agency, National Security Agency, and the National Reconnaissance Office (which runs satellites)
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Burdened by a bloated and expensive work force, the National Security Agency and other U.S. intelligence services must make deeper cuts in personnel and invest in new technology or their mission could be "seriously jeopardized," a federal commission said yesterday.NSA, which eavesdrops on foreign communications and is Maryland's largest employer with about 20,000 workers at Fort Meade, and the nation's two other spy agencies have been ordered by Congress to reduce their civilian personnel 24 percent by 2001.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | October 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Faced with an impending federal probe of alleged discrimination, the head of the country's largest spy agency told a congressional panel yesterday that he would redouble efforts to hire and promote women and minorities."
NEWS
January 24, 1992
In the breakdown of the Communist world, new information -- or what purports to be -- keeps coming out. New leads demand investigation. New rays of hope dangle before those who never gave up the thought that of 2,267 U.S. servicemen listed as missing in action (MIA) in Vietnam up to 1973, some might walk out, or their remains be identified.Respectful follow-up is needed for the new information presented to the Senate select committee investigating the issue, chaired by Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts and Sen. Robert Smith of New Hampshire.
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