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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2011
The pace of BRAC at Fort Meade is accelerating this weekend. Starting Saturday, the Arlington-based Defense Information Systems Agency will move portions of its Virginia operations every weekend through July until 4,300 of its jobs are based at Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County. A small advance party is on base currently. BRAC, the Defense Department's base realignment and closure process, is sending thousands of jobs to Fort Meade and Harford County's Aberdeen Proving Ground this year.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Col. Brian Foley has taken command of Fort Meade at a challenging time for the U.S. military. With the end of the war in Iraq in 2011 and the withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan next year, growth in defense spending was already expected to taper. Then came the sequester, the across-the-board cuts that led the Pentagon to furlough civilian employees over the summer. Fort Meade grew rapidly in the 2005 round of the base realignment known as BRAC to became the third-largest base in the Army.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
Defense contractor ManTech International Corp. said Thursday that it will be adding 80 to 90 jobs after landing a $23 million federal contract to help with an expansion at Fort Meade. The Defense Information Systems Agency is moving from Northern Virginia to the Anne Arundel County installation as part of BRAC, the military base realignment and closure effort. ManTech will be providing "integrated security services" to support the start-up of the new headquarters and needs to increase its security staff.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
Col. Brian P. Foley assumed command of Fort Meade during a ceremony Thursday morning. Foley, the 84th commander of the Army base in Anne Arundel County, succeeds Col. Edward C. Rothstein, who is retiring after 30 years in the military, the last two as commander of Fort Meade. Foley, a Signal Corps officer, served most recently as coalition branch chief, Joint Staff J6 Pentagon. "Words cannot express how thankful I am to have been afforded the opportunity to lead the U.S. Army garrison here," Foley said.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2010
More than 5,000 federal employees are expected to begin moving to Maryland's Fort George G. Meade military base starting in January and are to complete the move by June 2011, officials said. The moves are part of the federal government's Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) program and will bring to about 48,000 the number of people working at Fort Meade by Sept. 30, 2011. Representatives from the U.S. Department of Defense gave media representatives a tour Tuesday of the facilities being constructed for the new employees, many of whom now work in Northern Virginia.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
More than 500 civilian workers at Fort Meade will receive furlough notices over the next week, base officials said Wednesday. Supervisors and managers plan to hand deliver notices to more than 425 garrison employees by June 4. The notices describe plans for one furlough day per week from July 8 through Sept. 30. The Office of Personnel Management requires 30 days' notice before placing employees on temporary non-duty, non-pay status. "We thought it important that supervisors and managers hand deliver the notices to ensure every employee received them and had a chance to ask questions," said John Moeller, deputy garrison commander at the Army base in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
Col. Brian P. Foley assumed command of Fort Meade during a ceremony Thursday morning. Foley, the 84th commander of the Army base in Anne Arundel County, succeeds Col. Edward C. Rothstein, who is retiring after 30 years in the military, the last two as commander of Fort Meade. Foley, a Signal Corps officer, served most recently as coalition branch chief, Joint Staff J6 Pentagon. "Words cannot express how thankful I am to have been afforded the opportunity to lead the U.S. Army garrison here," Foley said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2010
The first of 10,000 additional federal workers expected next year at and around Fort Meade begin arriving next month, but the roads both inside and outside the World War I-era facility aren't ready, according to local officials monitoring the situation. "The first people are coming up Jan. 8," Jean Friedberg, regional growth coordinator of the Fort Meade Regional Growth Management Committee told a small private group called Transportation Advocates in Columbia on Thursday morning. But of the roughly $1 billion to $2 billion in transportation infrastructure upgrades thought to be needed (including $600 million to widen Routes 175 and 198)
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
While President Barack Obama described plans Thursday to make the U.S. military "leaner," officials in Maryland said the focus of installations and defense contractors here on intelligence, cyberwarfare, research and development is likely to protect the state from the deep cuts feared elsewhere. The defense strategy the president unveiled calls for bolstering the U.S. military presence in the Asian-Pacific region and increasing investment in NATO and other partnerships as the United States pulls troops from Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Col. Brian Foley has taken command of Fort Meade at a challenging time for the U.S. military. With the end of the war in Iraq in 2011 and the withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan next year, growth in defense spending was already expected to taper. Then came the sequester, the across-the-board cuts that led the Pentagon to furlough civilian employees over the summer. Fort Meade grew rapidly in the 2005 round of the base realignment known as BRAC to became the third-largest base in the Army.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
More than 500 civilian workers at Fort Meade will receive furlough notices over the next week, base officials said Wednesday. Supervisors and managers plan to hand deliver notices to more than 425 garrison employees by June 4. The notices describe plans for one furlough day per week from July 8 through Sept. 30. The Office of Personnel Management requires 30 days' notice before placing employees on temporary non-duty, non-pay status. "We thought it important that supervisors and managers hand deliver the notices to ensure every employee received them and had a chance to ask questions," said John Moeller, deputy garrison commander at the Army base in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
While President Barack Obama described plans Thursday to make the U.S. military "leaner," officials in Maryland said the focus of installations and defense contractors here on intelligence, cyberwarfare, research and development is likely to protect the state from the deep cuts feared elsewhere. The defense strategy the president unveiled calls for bolstering the U.S. military presence in the Asian-Pacific region and increasing investment in NATO and other partnerships as the United States pulls troops from Iraq and Afghanistan.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2011
The pace of BRAC at Fort Meade is accelerating this weekend. Starting Saturday, the Arlington-based Defense Information Systems Agency will move portions of its Virginia operations every weekend through July until 4,300 of its jobs are based at Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County. A small advance party is on base currently. BRAC, the Defense Department's base realignment and closure process, is sending thousands of jobs to Fort Meade and Harford County's Aberdeen Proving Ground this year.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2010
The first of 10,000 additional federal workers expected next year at and around Fort Meade begin arriving next month, but the roads both inside and outside the World War I-era facility aren't ready, according to local officials monitoring the situation. "The first people are coming up Jan. 8," Jean Friedberg, regional growth coordinator of the Fort Meade Regional Growth Management Committee told a small private group called Transportation Advocates in Columbia on Thursday morning. But of the roughly $1 billion to $2 billion in transportation infrastructure upgrades thought to be needed (including $600 million to widen Routes 175 and 198)
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2010
More than 5,000 federal employees are expected to begin moving to Maryland's Fort George G. Meade military base starting in January and are to complete the move by June 2011, officials said. The moves are part of the federal government's Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) program and will bring to about 48,000 the number of people working at Fort Meade by Sept. 30, 2011. Representatives from the U.S. Department of Defense gave media representatives a tour Tuesday of the facilities being constructed for the new employees, many of whom now work in Northern Virginia.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
Defense contractor ManTech International Corp. said Thursday that it will be adding 80 to 90 jobs after landing a $23 million federal contract to help with an expansion at Fort Meade. The Defense Information Systems Agency is moving from Northern Virginia to the Anne Arundel County installation as part of BRAC, the military base realignment and closure effort. ManTech will be providing "integrated security services" to support the start-up of the new headquarters and needs to increase its security staff.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2010
The long-anticipated BRAC boom — the new jobs, offices and ripple economic effects — are finally on the way. The Army will transfer nearly 1,500 jobs to Aberdeen Proving Ground in August and September, according to the state. That would nearly double the number that have moved to Harford County because of the national military base realignment and closure process, or BRAC, announced in 2005. Thousands more jobs, many of them unfilled, are expected to follow. Government contractors are gearing up, too. Offices are opening in Harford County at a fast clip — three dozen during the past year.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2010
Nothing is so heartening to job-seekers nowadays as word that thousands of openings are headed their way. That's the siren call of BRAC — the military base realignment and closure effort that's relocating jobs to Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County and other installations in Maryland. About 12,000 jobs are moving to the two Baltimore-area bases between August and next summer, along with thousands more off-base contractor jobs. And they are coming as unemployment is still near generational highs.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2010
Nothing is so heartening to job-seekers nowadays as word that thousands of openings are headed their way. That's the siren call of BRAC — the military base realignment and closure effort that's relocating jobs to Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County and other installations in Maryland. About 12,000 jobs are moving to the two Baltimore-area bases between August and next summer, along with thousands more off-base contractor jobs. And they are coming as unemployment is still near generational highs.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2010
The long-anticipated BRAC boom — the new jobs, offices and ripple economic effects — are finally on the way. The Army will transfer nearly 1,500 jobs to Aberdeen Proving Ground in August and September, according to the state. That would nearly double the number that have moved to Harford County because of the national military base realignment and closure process, or BRAC, announced in 2005. Thousands more jobs, many of them unfilled, are expected to follow. Government contractors are gearing up, too. Offices are opening in Harford County at a fast clip — three dozen during the past year.
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