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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 19, 2003
The Defense Information School at Fort Meade dedicated its library yesterday to the memory of Army Staff Sgt. Paul David Savanuck, a military photographer and Baltimore native who died in 1969 while covering the war in Vietnam. The 21,000-volume library houses books, videos and other reference materials for the military journalists and press officers the school trains. Savanuck, 23, had put down his camera to help a wounded soldier on the night of April 18, 1969, when he was killed by enemy fire near Cam Lo in South Vietnam.
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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
On the surface, Matt Hauser was an Army fan, wearing a black-and-camouflage jersey and rooting for the home team at the annual Army-Navy flag football matchup at Fort Meade. But like many Marylanders, he has deep respect for Navy, too. Lifting his Army jersey, he revealed a blue Navy jersey underneath. Even in flag football, Army-Navy is "a nice rivalry," said Hauser, a Severn insurance agent who helped organize a tailgate party for Thursday's game. But there's more to it, he said.
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NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1995
Stockton Warnock, 51, balding with a touch of silver to his hair, looks like he should be teaching his 11 classmates. But Mr. Warnock is actually studying journalism at the Defense Information School at Fort Meade.The Air Force reservist from Pennsylvania said he doesn't mind returning to the classroom, unlike some of his younger classmates."They like to complain about the schoolwork and studying," said Mr. Warnock, a staff sergeant and aircraft engineer. "I don't mind doing the night reading.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 20, 2011
Defense officials cut the ribbon Thursday on a $67 million facility to house the military's news and information operations at Fort Meade. The Defense Media Activity, established in 2008, consolidates the former Soldiers Media Center, Naval Media Center, Marine Corps News, Air Force News Service and American Forces Information Service into a single organization. It also includes the Stars and Stripes newspaper and the Defense Information School. Roughly 600 military and civilian employees and contractors moved into the building during the summer, officials said in a release.
NEWS
August 4, 1995
With the downsizing of the U.S. Department of Defense, this is a time of comings and goings at Fort George G. Meade.A few months ago, the sprawling military base in western Anne Arundel County lost its designation as 1st U.S. Army headquarters after the unit was deactivated and consolidated with the 2nd U.S. Army located at Fort Gillem, Ga.Not everyone is leaving, however. There have been moving vans bringing new people to Fort Meade in recent months as well.In a major consolidation of its public information functions, the Defense Department shifted three of its training institutes to the camp.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 20, 2011
Defense officials cut the ribbon Thursday on a $67 million facility to house the military's news and information operations at Fort Meade. The Defense Media Activity, established in 2008, consolidates the former Soldiers Media Center, Naval Media Center, Marine Corps News, Air Force News Service and American Forces Information Service into a single organization. It also includes the Stars and Stripes newspaper and the Defense Information School. Roughly 600 military and civilian employees and contractors moved into the building during the summer, officials said in a release.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
On the surface, Matt Hauser was an Army fan, wearing a black-and-camouflage jersey and rooting for the home team at the annual Army-Navy flag football matchup at Fort Meade. But like many Marylanders, he has deep respect for Navy, too. Lifting his Army jersey, he revealed a blue Navy jersey underneath. Even in flag football, Army-Navy is "a nice rivalry," said Hauser, a Severn insurance agent who helped organize a tailgate party for Thursday's game. But there's more to it, he said.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2001
Aberdeen. Tailhook. Kelly Flinn. Not the sort of subjects you'd want to bring up around the top brass of the Army, Navy and Air Force. But at the Defense Information School at Fort Meade, military officers spend much of their time discussing these and other image-tarnishing disasters. Each scandal becomes the vehicle to teach the next class of military journalists and public affairs officers what not to do when talking to the press. The school's credo is "maximum disclosure, minimum delay"; its challenge is balancing the military's need for secrecy with the public's right to know.
NEWS
December 16, 1993
The Army Corps of Engineers has concluded that consolidating three Department of Defense media schools at Fort Meade will have no significant environmental impact on the post.The final report will not be publicly available until next week, according to Jack Butler, who works in the corps planning division in Baltimore. But the overall results of the study were released by the Pentagon yesterday. No details were made public. An Army statement simply says the environmental assessment shows no adverse impacts due to the move.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | December 31, 1992
Three Department of Defense schools that train military public relations officers will consolidate and move to Fort Meade, bringing 1,000 students and staff with them, a base spokesman said yesterday.The announcement comes after two years of assurances from the garrison commander, Col. Kent D. Menser, that the facilities would relocate at the Odenton base, probably by 1995, and be the hub of an educational cluster.Colonel Menser frequently mentioned the school to audiences and expressed his frustration at the slow process of moving it to reporters during several interviews over the last year.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 19, 2003
The Defense Information School at Fort Meade dedicated its library yesterday to the memory of Army Staff Sgt. Paul David Savanuck, a military photographer and Baltimore native who died in 1969 while covering the war in Vietnam. The 21,000-volume library houses books, videos and other reference materials for the military journalists and press officers the school trains. Savanuck, 23, had put down his camera to help a wounded soldier on the night of April 18, 1969, when he was killed by enemy fire near Cam Lo in South Vietnam.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2001
Aberdeen. Tailhook. Kelly Flinn. Not the sort of subjects you'd want to bring up around the top brass of the Army, Navy and Air Force. But at the Defense Information School at Fort Meade, military officers spend much of their time discussing these and other image-tarnishing disasters. Each scandal becomes the vehicle to teach the next class of military journalists and public affairs officers what not to do when talking to the press. The school's credo is "maximum disclosure, minimum delay"; its challenge is balancing the military's need for secrecy with the public's right to know.
NEWS
August 4, 1995
With the downsizing of the U.S. Department of Defense, this is a time of comings and goings at Fort George G. Meade.A few months ago, the sprawling military base in western Anne Arundel County lost its designation as 1st U.S. Army headquarters after the unit was deactivated and consolidated with the 2nd U.S. Army located at Fort Gillem, Ga.Not everyone is leaving, however. There have been moving vans bringing new people to Fort Meade in recent months as well.In a major consolidation of its public information functions, the Defense Department shifted three of its training institutes to the camp.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1995
Stockton Warnock, 51, balding with a touch of silver to his hair, looks like he should be teaching his 11 classmates. But Mr. Warnock is actually studying journalism at the Defense Information School at Fort Meade.The Air Force reservist from Pennsylvania said he doesn't mind returning to the classroom, unlike some of his younger classmates."They like to complain about the schoolwork and studying," said Mr. Warnock, a staff sergeant and aircraft engineer. "I don't mind doing the night reading.
NEWS
October 2, 1996
County road engineers and land-use planners will be available tonight at Arundel High School on Annapolis Road to discuss public and private projects planned for West County.The information will be presented in a series of 30-minute, small group forums from 4: 30 p.m. to 9 p.m., according to John A. Morris, spokesman for the county Department of Planning and Code Enforcement.Specialists from PACE, the county Public Works and Recreation and Parks departments will answer questions about projects such as the Odenton Town Center, the extension of Town Center Boulevard and Morgan Road, the expansion of Severn/Danza Park and the West County and South Shore trails, and Tipton Airfield.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Two Army veterans, who tended to comrades injured in battle in wars that were more than two decades apart, received long overdue military honors Friday before an audience of family, friends and some 200 members of the Armed Forces at Fort Meade. Dr. Charles E. Rath Jr., an Army captain and surgeon 67 years ago during World War II, and Charles Shyab, a medic during the Vietnam War 45 years ago, both received the Bronze Star from Col. Jeremy Martin, commandant of the Defense Information School at the Army post in Anne Arundel County.
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