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NEWS
September 16, 2010
Now that the primary election is over, it is incredible how few voters and politicians failed to make any connection between the $700 billion we spend every year on defense and the government deficits and financial crisis the U.S. is facing. The Bush administration added nearly $5 trillion in costs for wars which directly went into unpaid U.S. debt. Since 2001, military spending has doubled, and even then it was already more than any other country's. Now it is more than the rest of the world combined.
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NEWS
March 1, 2014
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel's plans for a reduction of the active Army strength from 520,000 to around 440,000 are not only unreasonable and bad, but they will also hurt our safety and security and ability to defend ourselves against any future conflicts ( "A smaller, more nimble force," Feb. 27). Such a foolish proposal will shrink the Army to its smallest size since before World War II. The Army is not alone in Mr. Hagel's proposal. The reduction is part of the Pentagon's $75 billion budget cut over the next two years.
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NEWS
By Nancy Langer | February 1, 2010
Today, President Obama will release his budget request, asking more for defense than any other president -- a whopping $708 billion for the Department of Defense in fiscal 2011. Also today, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates will release a document known inside Washington as the QDR -- the quadrennial defense review, a four-year snapshot of our security plans. The last QDR was done under Donald Rumsfeld, with George W. Bush as president, but be prepared to wonder if Mr. Bush is still president.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 22, 2013
First came the drama over the government shutdown. Then the showdown over the debt ceiling. Now another round of negotiations on the budget deficit. Pardon me for asking, but when exactly will Washington begin to deal with the crisis of jobs, wages and widening inequality? Job growth is slowing perilously. The Labor Department reported today that only 148,000 jobs were created in September - way down from the average of 207,000 new jobs a month in the first quarter of the year.
NEWS
February 6, 1991
Just how the Persian Gulf war tangles up a defense budget predicated on the end of the Cold War is well illustrated by the newest Washington debate over the Strategic Defense Initiative and the B-2 Stealth bomber.To hear Defense Secretary Dick Cheney tell it, you would think the success of Patriot missiles in shooting down Iraqi Scud rockets is evidence the nation should go ahead with Ronald Reagan's "Star Wars" project for combating a massive Soviet intercontinental missile strike. You would think, too, the effectiveness of F-117 Stealth fighter-bombers in hitting Iraqi targets unseen by enemy radar makes a case for the B-2.Not everyone agrees.
NEWS
September 1, 2012
As a nonviolent activist, I was really disappointed to see the op-ed by Clayola Brown ("Sequestration would destroy U.S. economy," Aug. 27). What astonished me is that it was written by the president of the A. Philip Randolph Institute. Surely, all progressive activists greatly respect the work of A. Philip Randolph, a legendary organizer and activist. However, the current president of his institute wrote this: "Sequestration cuts in the defense budget would be especially devastating to the economy because of the aerospace sector's importance to local economies across America.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 22, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Here's a tricky question for the serious budget-wonks:Where in the federal budget would you find spending for:* Breast-cancer research.* Environmental cleanup efforts.* Drug-enforcement programs.* Financing for public schools.* Aid to the Soviet Union.* Jobs for workers in Connecticut.* Rifle practice for neighborhood teens.* Government support for the 1996 Olympics.* Memorial Day and July 4th concerts?If you're busily thumbing through the spending programs for all 149 federal departments and agencies, let us save you the trouble: Look under "Department of Defense, Military."
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | October 17, 1990
SAN DIEGO -- Even war on the horizon cannot stop the "de-Reaganizing" of the U.S. defense budget as it continues to recede from the hefty levels of the early and mid-1980s, defense electronics officials say.By the year 2000, defense spending will decline by one-third and dip even below pre-World War II levels in terms of share of the gross national product, the Electronic Industries Association said yesterday in an annual 10-year market forecast of the...
NEWS
June 15, 2011
Defense Secretary Robert Gates was right to call out our European allies for their lack of commitment to NATO and their over dependence on the defense forces of the USA ("Gates hits NATO allies hard," June 11). Anyone who has traveled to Western Europe can only marvel at the standard of living enjoyed by the majority their citizens. Germany is an interesting case in that this is a country that suffered greatly economically as a result of two world wars but with the help of outsiders has become an economic powerhouse.
NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | September 21, 1993
It has been widely understood that the Clinton administration planned to pay for new social programs mainly by cuts in defense spending. It is, therefore, no surprise that the budget proposed by Secretary of Defense Les Aspin features deep cuts and proposes a level of spending that is more than $128 billion below the levels proposed by the Bush administration. What was not understood was that the Clinton/Aspin budget would propose to use those reduced dollars to pay for new activities not previously funded by the Department of Defense.
NEWS
By Claude Berube | September 16, 2013
Recent satellite imagery suggests that North Korea has greatly expanded its uranium enrichment capabilities. The nation just promised to launch more long-range rockets "soon. " And, reportedly, labs in Pyongyang are hard at work developing nuclear-armed missiles capable of striking the U.S. mainland. With the North Korean threat apparently mounting, it's essential for the United States to continue investing in missile defense. Missile shield technologies first gained attention in 1983 when President Ronald Reagan proposed a bold endeavor called the Strategic Defense Initiative.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
One of the reasons Congress seems reluctant to stop budget sequestration ("The sequester stand-off," Feb. 7) is that few realize the real consequences of indiscriminately slashing spending in blind, indiscriminate fashion - - particularly for our national security. Under sequestration, the defense budget alone would weather $500 billion in cuts across every program, affecting fundamental military capabilities. The cuts will sideline our aircraft carriers and force other ships from service, weakening us in the Pacific while also freeing Iran to shut down the Strait of Hormuz at will.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | January 12, 2013
Biography isn't policy. President Barack Obama's choice for secretary of defense, Chuck Hagel, former Nebraska Republican senator, has a resume most politicians can envy: a clean senatorial record, no ethical lapses and two Purple Hearts from a war many opposed and many more tried to avoid. Some think Hagel's 2006 comment about "the Jewish lobby" should disqualify him, believing it a code word for anti-Semitic sentiments. There is nothing wrong with criticizing the policies of any Israeli government.
NEWS
By Lawrence Korb and Michael Conathan | January 10, 2013
Before superstorm Sandy pounded the shores of the East Coast, it had already claimed its first American victims. With the storm still a day from landfall, the U.S. Coast Guard received a distress signal from the tall ship Bounty located approximately 90 miles off the cost of North Carolina. Tragically, the ship's captain and one of her crew were claimed by the sea, but a matter of hours later, 14 other sailors were safe on shore. All in a day's work for the service whose motto is semper paratus - always ready.
NEWS
November 20, 2012
Going off the fiscal cliff would not be the end of the world ("Obama talks tough," Nov. 15). The U.S. defense budget now totals more than spending on defense by the next top six countries combined even as we are getting out of two foreign wars. Surely that budget can stand a 10 percent cut. The checks I received from the Bush tax cuts were only for about $150. But if workers expect to receive Social Security benefits when they retire, they need to fund that program with the 2 percent payroll tax just like current recipients have done for their entire working careers.
NEWS
By Melvin A. Goodman | September 30, 2012
Over the past decade, the United States has engaged in the most significant increase in defense spending since the Korean War. Trillions of dollars have been allocated for the Pentagon, with little congressional monitoring or internal oversight. The defense budget for 2012 exceeds $600 billion, nearly equaling the combined defense spending of the rest of world. Every U.S. taxpayer spends twice as much for the cost of national defense as each British citizen; five times as much as each German; and six times as much as each Japanese.
NEWS
By LAWRENCE KORB | July 20, 1995
Washington. -- Six years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, Congress and the executive branch continue to approach defense spending as if it were Cold War business as usual. In 1996, the U.S. will spend about as much on defense as it did during the mid 1970s.Far from pursuing a ''peace dividend,'' neither congressional nor recent presidential proposals to balance the budget envision substantial reductions in U.S. military spending below average Cold War levels.A bolder vision of our defense capabilities and needs is required.
BUSINESS
By Michael Enright and Michael Enright,Special to The Sun | October 22, 1990
The economic picture for Westinghouse Electric Corp.'s Linthicum facility, the county's largest private employer and a major player in the defense industry, won't be greatly affected by the Persian Gulf crisis, experts say, unless the confrontation explodes into a shooting war."Until this thing turns into a real fight, there isn't going to be much of a boon for anyone [in the defense industry] because nobody is consuming anything," said Ron Fraser, an analyst for the Center for Defense Information in Washington.
NEWS
September 1, 2012
As a nonviolent activist, I was really disappointed to see the op-ed by Clayola Brown ("Sequestration would destroy U.S. economy," Aug. 27). What astonished me is that it was written by the president of the A. Philip Randolph Institute. Surely, all progressive activists greatly respect the work of A. Philip Randolph, a legendary organizer and activist. However, the current president of his institute wrote this: "Sequestration cuts in the defense budget would be especially devastating to the economy because of the aerospace sector's importance to local economies across America.
NEWS
By Clayola Brown | August 27, 2012
Across America, manufacturing workers and their families are starting to hope again. Unemployment remains unacceptably high at 8.2 percent, but it has come down from 10 percent in October 2009. After the worst recession since the Great Depression, the U.S. economy has created 4 million jobs over the past two years. Working families have a message for Congress: Keep the fragile recovery alive. But unbelievably, Congress is on the verge of tacitly approving huge budget cuts that would send up to 1.5 million Americans back to the unemployment lines.
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