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By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2010
Attorneys for three men accused of killing Kenneth N. Harris resumed their verbal sparring Tuesday with the state's witnesses and their questioning of virtually every iota of testimony. But a crucial identification of two of the defendants by a security guard was left unchallenged in the defense's cross-examination of the witness, even as the lawyers took apart his professional history and other matters only tangentially related to the murder of the former Baltimore councilman on Sept.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
A Baltimore judge this week ruled to allow city prosecutors to withhold identifying witness information from defendants in the sweeping case against alleged members of the Black Guerrilla Family gang. Judge Sylvester B. Cox on Tuesday granted a protective order, requested by the state's attorney's office, on any materials that could expose witnesses to harm or intimidation, after hearing a detective describe the fears witnesses had about cooperating with the investigation. Forty-eight suspects accused of being members of the BGF gang, which operated a violent, widespread drug trade in the city and corrupted the Baltimore City Detention Center, were indicted last November.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
Pre-trial arguments are expected to be heard Tuesday in a high-profile murder and drug conspiracy case in which most defendants have flipped and attorneys couldn't review evidence with their clients until two days before trial due to safety concerns from prosecutors. Robert G. Moore, 45, is accused of being at the top of an East Baltimore drug syndicate that killed a man and shot five others to avenge the death of his relative, former prep wrestling standout Darian Kess. Prosecutors pointed to the indictment when it was filed 16 months ago as an example of taking on complex and challenging case.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
A veteran defense attorney running an independent campaign for Baltimore state's attorney argued in Circuit Court Friday that city election workers "messed up" when they ruled he did not have enough signatures to appear on the November ballot.  "Just because they say it's so, don't make it so," said Edward Smith Jr., the attorney for candidate Russell A. Neverdon Sr. "Each and every [signature] they looked at, they messed up. " Judge Martin P. Welch said he will postpone ruling on the case until after he hears more evidence next Friday.  The city's Board of Elections said earlier this monrth that Neverdon fell more than 1,000 signatures short of the 4,160 needed to challenge Democrat Marilyn J. Mosby on the general election ballot.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
When Kiheem Taylor was charged with kidnapping two teenagers at a Timonium light-rail station and raping one of them, prosecutors struggled with an all-too common problem — they didn't have enough solid evidence. But Taylor gave prosecutors a break when he made phone calls from the Baltimore County Detention Center. Just months earlier, authorities had begun recording inmates' phone calls, and Taylor implicated himself while talking to an ex-girlfriend. Judge Robert N. Dugan said at the time that the call was "overwhelming, damning evidence of [Taylor's]
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | March 11, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Under relentless cross-examination by defense attorneys, Rodney King admitted he lied in the past about some aspects of his beating, and he testified he is not now sure if the police officers who beat and kicked him used racial epithets.Saying he initially denied that racial slurs were used at the request of his mother, Mr. King said yesterday that his testimony the previous day was the truth but he couldn't be sure whether the officers were saying "nigger" or "killer" as he was taunted during his violent arrest on March 3, 1991.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | June 17, 2008
The lawyers representing a man accused of killing a correctional officer at the Maryland House of Correction in 2006 argued yesterday that their client should not face the death penalty because they are not being adequately compensated for their work on the case. Gary E. Proctor and co-counsel Michael E. Lawlor entered a motion yesterday to preclude the death penalty as a sentencing option in the murder trial of Lee Edward Stephens, one of two inmates accused in the killing, because the fees they are being paid by the state to mount a defense are "manifestly unreasonable."
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | March 17, 2007
About a week before jury selection was set to begin, a federal judge substantially delayed the start of the public corruption trial against former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell Sr. and his wife, pointing to "irreconcilable conflicts of interest" among the couple's attorneys. The unexplained departure of the Bromwells' attorneys days before the long-scheduled trial was to start left the schedule of the case in flux. Prosecutors, defense attorneys and the judge all declined to provide details about why the defense lawyers left the case so abruptly.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2012
Alexander Kinyua, the 21-year-old accused of killing a man and eating his organs, has been formally indicted on charges of first-degree murder and assault and has been sent to a Maryland state mental hospital. Harford County State's Attorney Joseph I. Cassilly said in a statement Tuesday that the indictment follows a hearing Monday in District Court in which a judge ordered that Kinyua be transferred to Clifton T. Perkins Hospital for a competency evaluation, following a request from his attorneys.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
For the second time this summer, a local family has been awarded a huge sum of money by a Baltimore jury after claiming that negligent care by a local hospital caused their child to be born with a disability. A jury Tuesday awarded $21 million to a Glen Burnie couple whose son was born prematurely with cerebral palsy at Harbor Hospital in 2002, and is now, at age 9, "literally trapped inside his body" with a fully functioning mind but a severely disabled body, according to a family attorney.
NEWS
By Anne Colt Leitess | August 19, 2014
Editor's note: This article has been updated from an earlier version Criminal trials typically end once the jury returns its verdict. The attorneys move on to their next cases, unless appeal is pursued, and the debate ends. Unfortunately, that has not been the case after the recent trial of State v. Joseph Walker in Anne Arundel County. An Anne Arundel County grand jury indicted the defendant in this case for murder and other offenses after a Maryland State Police investigation revealed strong evidence that the defendant shot and killed an unarmed man during a road rage incident.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
Victoria F. "Vickie" Gelfman, a prosecutor in the Howard County state's attorney's office whose blog posts about her struggle with acute myeloid leukemia served as an inspiration to others, died Friday of the disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Ellicott City resident was 31. "Vickie was such a shining star. She was very gifted, talented and had a warm spirit," said Howard County District Judge Pamila J. Brown. "She had a wonderful spirit and a pleasant demeanor. And as a prosecutor, she represented the state so well.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
The Howard County trial for a 16-year-old accused of planning her father's murder has been postponed until February. Defense attorneys for Morgan Lane Arnold asked for the delay so the teen can undergo further psychiatric evaluation. Arnold is accused of conspiring with her boyfriend to kill her father, 58-year-old Dennis Lane, in May 2013. Wednesday, Circuit Judge Timothy McCrone granted the defense's request so Arnold can be evaluated to determine whether she is competent to stand trial, according to a spokesman for the state's attorney's office.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
A Towson attorney was sentenced Tuesday to 18 months in jail for smuggling drugs into the Baltimore County jail. "I am ashamed and saddened I stand before you in this capacity," Jill Swerdlin told Circuit Judge Timothy J. Martin before the she was sentenced. Swerdlin, 47, a defense attorney who has represented suspected dealers, pleaded guilty to drug charges in June. She admitted she had smuggled Suboxone — a drug used to treat addiction to opiates — into the Baltimore County Detention Center to clients during visits.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Jury selection begins Friday in the murder trial of Joseph Lamont Walker, a New Jersey police officer accused of the fatal shooting of a Lansdowne man during a road rage incident in Anne Arundel County last summer. The case will go on as scheduled after Judge Michael Wachs dismissed a motion Thursday by Walker's attorneys to have the case dismissed. One hundred and fifty potential jurors have been called to the Anne Arundel Circuit Court in Annapolis for the case, which has drawn attention in law enforcement circles.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
A surveillance camera near the East Baltimore murder scene spied a group from the Black Guerrilla Family gathered to congratulate a gang member on a job well done - a long-time rival was dead and a prior killing avenged. Henry Mills had been a BGF target since the gang started to take over the drug trade along a stretch of Greenmount Avenue years before, and he was suspected of murdering a senior BGF figure, authorities say. By 2011 Mills' insistence on running a freelance heroin operation on gang territory was too much to tolerate.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2002
A Pasadena woman charged with killing her estranged husband on Christmas Day 2000 listened in a courtroom yesterday as prosecutors characterized her as someone determined to win a custody battle, while defense attorneys described her as a battered wife who fired her gun in self-defense. As the trial of Kelly Ann Clutter began in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, attorneys and witnesses did not dispute that the 35-year-old woman shot and killed her husband, David Clutter Sr., 32, at her home on Solley Road on Dec. 25, 2000.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2011
A West Baltimore teenager who says three city police officers kidnapped him and dumped him in a Howard County park with no shoes or cellphone testified that he lied about being beaten up, and denied telling an attorney that he was choked by the officers. The admission came Monday, on the fourth day of testimony in the kidnapping and misconduct trial of Officers Tyrone S. Francis, Gregory Hellen and Milton G. Smith III, who are accused of leaving Michael B. Johnson Jr. in Patapsco Valley State Park on May 4, 2009, after dropping off his friend, Shawnquin Woodland, in East Baltimore earlier the same day. When Johnson called 911 from Howard County, he told the dispatcher he had been beaten up, which he testified on Monday was untrue, except for a tap of a nightstick.
NEWS
May 8, 2014
My former colleagues in police work made large amounts of overtime due to Maryland's marijuana prohibition, and commentator Sidney Rocke was correct that defense attorneys also make tons of money dealing with marijuana possession cases. I am certain that defense attorneys in Colorado have a lot less to do now that people there have voted to deal with marijuana like beer. Yes, Del. Joseph F. Vallario Jr. is a dinosaur who needs to be retired ( "A dictator in the House," May 5)
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
As prosecutors across Maryland wait for the new law that will remove criminal penalties for possessing small amounts of marijuana, they're taking a patchwork approach in the way they handle such cases. In some counties, including Harford and Carroll, state's attorneys are taking a hard line, continuing to seek criminal convictions that carry the threat of jail time and fines for offenders. But in Baltimore County and some other localities, prosecutors have become more lenient, knowing that on Oct. 1 possession of small amounts of pot will trigger nothing more than a civil fine.
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