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By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2010
Attorneys for three men accused of killing Kenneth N. Harris resumed their verbal sparring Tuesday with the state's witnesses and their questioning of virtually every iota of testimony. But a crucial identification of two of the defendants by a security guard was left unchallenged in the defense's cross-examination of the witness, even as the lawyers took apart his professional history and other matters only tangentially related to the murder of the former Baltimore councilman on Sept.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2014
When Trena Williams was charged last fall with first-degree murder and held without bail, she was four months pregnant. Behind bars, inmates get prenatal care. So when the charges were later reduced to accessory after the fact and she was released on home detention, Circuit Judge Stephen J. Sfekas ordered Williams, 29, to receive prenatal care as one of the conditions of her release. But even after she'd given birth to a healthy baby girl, prosecutors wanted proof that Williams had received care during her pregnancy, threatening her with jail time if she didn't comply.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
Pre-trial arguments are expected to be heard Tuesday in a high-profile murder and drug conspiracy case in which most defendants have flipped and attorneys couldn't review evidence with their clients until two days before trial due to safety concerns from prosecutors. Robert G. Moore, 45, is accused of being at the top of an East Baltimore drug syndicate that killed a man and shot five others to avenge the death of his relative, former prep wrestling standout Darian Kess. Prosecutors pointed to the indictment when it was filed 16 months ago as an example of taking on complex and challenging case.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
WASHINGTON — The alleged victim in the Naval Academy sexual assault case testified Tuesday that she drank heavily before and during an April 2012 party and didn't remember having sex with any fellow midshipmen. The woman, now a senior at the academy, testified on the opening day of the court-martial of Midshipman Joshua Tate, who is accused of aggravated sexual assault and making false statements to investigators. The case is being heard by a military judge at the Washington Navy Yard.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
With a full math and science scholarship to the Johns Hopkins University and accolades for his writing, Howard County's Mohammad Hassan Khalid seemed ready to continue the American dream his father embarked on years ago when he brought the family from Pakistan. But instead, on Friday the 18-year-old Khalid became one of the youngest people ever convicted in federal court of conspiracy to aid terrorists. He could receive up to 15 years in prison and a $250,000 fine at his sentencing, which has not been scheduled.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
When Kiheem Taylor was charged with kidnapping two teenagers at a Timonium light-rail station and raping one of them, prosecutors struggled with an all-too common problem — they didn't have enough solid evidence. But Taylor gave prosecutors a break when he made phone calls from the Baltimore County Detention Center. Just months earlier, authorities had begun recording inmates' phone calls, and Taylor implicated himself while talking to an ex-girlfriend. Judge Robert N. Dugan said at the time that the call was "overwhelming, damning evidence of [Taylor's]
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | March 11, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Under relentless cross-examination by defense attorneys, Rodney King admitted he lied in the past about some aspects of his beating, and he testified he is not now sure if the police officers who beat and kicked him used racial epithets.Saying he initially denied that racial slurs were used at the request of his mother, Mr. King said yesterday that his testimony the previous day was the truth but he couldn't be sure whether the officers were saying "nigger" or "killer" as he was taunted during his violent arrest on March 3, 1991.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | March 17, 2007
About a week before jury selection was set to begin, a federal judge substantially delayed the start of the public corruption trial against former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell Sr. and his wife, pointing to "irreconcilable conflicts of interest" among the couple's attorneys. The unexplained departure of the Bromwells' attorneys days before the long-scheduled trial was to start left the schedule of the case in flux. Prosecutors, defense attorneys and the judge all declined to provide details about why the defense lawyers left the case so abruptly.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | June 17, 2008
The lawyers representing a man accused of killing a correctional officer at the Maryland House of Correction in 2006 argued yesterday that their client should not face the death penalty because they are not being adequately compensated for their work on the case. Gary E. Proctor and co-counsel Michael E. Lawlor entered a motion yesterday to preclude the death penalty as a sentencing option in the murder trial of Lee Edward Stephens, one of two inmates accused in the killing, because the fees they are being paid by the state to mount a defense are "manifestly unreasonable."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2012
Alexander Kinyua, the 21-year-old accused of killing a man and eating his organs, has been formally indicted on charges of first-degree murder and assault and has been sent to a Maryland state mental hospital. Harford County State's Attorney Joseph I. Cassilly said in a statement Tuesday that the indictment follows a hearing Monday in District Court in which a judge ordered that Kinyua be transferred to Clifton T. Perkins Hospital for a competency evaluation, following a request from his attorneys.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 27, 2014
Have you heard why the war on drugs will never end? It's because of the enormous number of people involved in it: police officers, federal agents, defense attorneys, judges, prosecutors, wardens, prison guards, parole and probation officers. The nation has made such a huge investment in the war on drugs that politicians will keep it going forever, the theory goes. Disrupt it, and we would lose four decades of sunk costs and a significant part of the public-sector economy. I used to hear this all the time and dismiss it as libertarian hyperbole, or what Joe Cassilly, the Harford County state's attorney, might call the irrational ravings of "a bunch of potheads.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
A former Naval Academy football player who is accused of sexually assaulting a fellow midshipman is moving toward a court-martial next month, officials said Tuesday. Jason Ehrenberg, a civilian attorney for Midshipman Joshua Tate, said the military judge in the case told prosecutors and defense attorneys this week that he planned to deny motions to dismiss the case. "We're going forward," Ehrenberg said. The judge, Marine Col. Daniel Daugherty, has not yet issued his rulings, and a Naval Academy spokesman said it would be improper to comment on a pending case.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | February 3, 2014
An Ellicott City man was convicted last week in the armed robbery of a convenience store located at an Exxon gas station in Ellicott City. Peair Montevon Turner, 26, of the 5500 block of Waterloo Road, was found guilty on Thursday, Jan. 30 by a jury at the conclusion of a four-day trial held in Howard County Circuit Court. He was convicted of first- and second-degree assault, armed robbery, use of a handgun in the commission of a felony, robbery and theft.  He is scheduled to be sentenced by Judge Timothy J. McCrone on Feb. 18. According to Howard County State's Attorney spokesman Wayne Kirwan, Turner's defense attorneys told the jury that their client did not commit the robbery, and suggested that the robbery was committed by Turner's brother.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
Prosecutors said Friday they intend to explore the tempestuous relationship between the lead detective in the Phylicia Barnes case and his daughter when his trial on assault and burglary charges begins next week. The detective, Daniel T. Nicholson IV, is accused of barging into a Northeast Baltimore apartment, knocking a woman to the ground and punching another as he frantically searched for his daughter. His actions were previously scrutinized at the trial of Michael Maurice Johnson, who was indicted in Barnes' death, when defense attorneys sought to cast doubt on Nicholson's credibility by pointing to the parallels between Nicholson's own hunt and the search for Barnes.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
A lawyer for a Naval Academy midshipman who is the alleged victim of a sexual assault by two fellow classmates is seeking court documents from the academy's superintendent. Attorney Ryan Guilds is seeking all of the motions in the cases against the classmates who are accused in the alleged asault, as well as the transcript of the eight-day preliminary hearing and the report of a military judge who reviewed the case and made recommendations to the superintendent, Vice Adm. Michael H. Miller.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Low-risk criminal defendants would no longer have to raise money for bail before trial under a sweeping overhaul of Maryland's centuries-old pretrial release system being considered by a panel set up by the General Assembly. In recommendations released this week, task force members said the state should scrap the system under which poor defendants often remain in jail while more affluent suspects can post bond and get out. The members urged that Maryland replace the system, which is derived from English common law, with one that detains defendants only if they are found to be a flight risk or danger to the community.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2002
A Pasadena woman charged with killing her estranged husband on Christmas Day 2000 listened in a courtroom yesterday as prosecutors characterized her as someone determined to win a custody battle, while defense attorneys described her as a battered wife who fired her gun in self-defense. As the trial of Kelly Ann Clutter began in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, attorneys and witnesses did not dispute that the 35-year-old woman shot and killed her husband, David Clutter Sr., 32, at her home on Solley Road on Dec. 25, 2000.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
For the second time this summer, a local family has been awarded a huge sum of money by a Baltimore jury after claiming that negligent care by a local hospital caused their child to be born with a disability. A jury Tuesday awarded $21 million to a Glen Burnie couple whose son was born prematurely with cerebral palsy at Harbor Hospital in 2002, and is now, at age 9, "literally trapped inside his body" with a fully functioning mind but a severely disabled body, according to a family attorney.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge said he is considering holding city prosecutors in contempt after they arranged a secret "lunch date" between two cooperating witnesses in a high-profile murder trial, but said he would not throw out the case or grant a mistrial. Judge Emanuel Brown said he found the prosecutors' actions "contemptible" and said they "violated the process in a way that cannot be tolerated. " Brown said he would defer a decision on discipline until after trial. Defense attorneys complained that they should have been told of the meeting, which they said could be construed as a "benefit" for the witnesses and running afoul of rules instructing witnesses not to discuss testimony.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
Pre-trial arguments are expected to be heard Tuesday in a high-profile murder and drug conspiracy case in which most defendants have flipped and attorneys couldn't review evidence with their clients until two days before trial due to safety concerns from prosecutors. Robert G. Moore, 45, is accused of being at the top of an East Baltimore drug syndicate that killed a man and shot five others to avenge the death of his relative, former prep wrestling standout Darian Kess. Prosecutors pointed to the indictment when it was filed 16 months ago as an example of taking on complex and challenging case.
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