Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDefendants
IN THE NEWS

Defendants

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2012
Faced with a court decision that could cost tens of millions of dollars to pay for lawyers at bail hearings, the Senate and House of Delegates passed conflicting measures Thursday to limit the scope of the ruling — setting up a potential tussle between the chambers on which approach to take. The Senate bill, which passed 45-1, would give suspects held by police the right to be brought before a judge with a defense lawyer within 48 hours. The House bill, which passed 133-0, would not. It seeks only to make clear that defendants are not entitled to a lawyer until they appear before a judge when the court is next in session.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
The director of Baltimore's African-American history museum on Thursday defended his decision to bar a civil rights leader from an event marking the 50th anniversary of landmark legislation after she questioned the decision to include a convicted murderer among the honorees. A. Skipp Sanders, executive director of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture, said he barred Helena Hicks, 80, from the premises last week because he "could not be assured that she would be respectful and courteous to other panel members and in the presence of our audience" and "she might not be tolerant.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 18, 2011
For defendants in high-profile criminal hearings, the so-called "perp walk" is one of the more distasteful traditions of American jurisprudence. The news media are alerted to a time and location when the alleged perpetrator will be walked to the courthouse so they can photograph him or her en masse - often in handcuffs and surrounded by police. Defense attorneys don't care for this parade and have argued against it on the grounds not just of public humiliation but of fairness.
NEWS
October 5, 2014
I hail reporter Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun for your investigative report on Baltimore police officers' excessive use of force and the astronomical financial and psychological costs of this to our city ( "Undue Force: Suits against police cost millions," Sept. 28). Baltimore City has mishandled, lost, and poorly accounted for millions of taxpayer dollars in recent years. At the same time, city officials regularly claim the need for new taxes, bonds and other revenue sources to pay for badly needed upgrades to city schools and recreation centers; each spring the city claims that it has insufficient funds to operate all of the park and neighborhood swimming pools daily over the summer, and neighborhoods such as West Baltimore continue to struggle with blight and joblessness.
NEWS
February 8, 2012
Maryland Public Defender Paul De Wolfe stated he considered using panel attorneys to represent indigent defendants to staff commissioner bail hearings, but he concluded there are not enough panel attorneys statewide to meet the demand ("Maryland public defender asks for stay in high court's ruling," Feb. 3). Last year, after months of contacting the Baltimore City Public Defender's office to get my application approved and certification as a panel attorney, I finally received my certification.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
Before self-proclaimed 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was brought into court Saturday, Carole Reuben of Potomac said his arraignment would mark "the beginning of the end of the process. " Her son, Todd Hayes Reuben, was a passenger on American Airlines Flight 77, the airliner that was hijacked by five al-Qaida operatives and flown into the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001. The Potomac man was 40. But any hope that the arraignments of Mohammed and four alleged co-conspirators might bring some healing to family members, a decade after they lost loved ones in the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, was stymied Saturday by a halting proceeding in which the defendants refused to participate.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
State judiciary administrators have asked the state's top court to throw out a landmark ruling that poor defendants have a constitutional right to public defenders at their first bail hearings. The request came this week as lawmakers attempt to respond to the decision, discussing sweeping changes to the way the state handles defendants before trial. But in this week's court filing, the attorney general's office questioned whether the legislative proposals would give low-risk defendants a better chance of being quickly freed, arguing the opposite could happen.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
Shykill Brewer was arrested on a misdemeanor gun charge days before Christmas. He should have been able to post bail in plenty of time to celebrate with his infant son and the rest of his family, but instead spent six weeks in jail. Under court rules, defendants should have a chance to post bail or ask a judge for release within 24 hours, or as soon as courts are open. It took 43 days for Brewer. A judge finally set his bail at $100,000, and Brewer's family soon secured his release.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
A city judge cleared the way Monday for new trials of two men accused of slashing the throats of three children in a grisly triple murder nine years ago, settling a slew of legal disputes over years-old testimony and forensic evidence. A March 11 trial has been scheduled for Policarpio Espinoza Perez, 30, and a separate trial for Adan Canela, 25, will likely follow. The defense and prosecution agreed to give the co-defendants separate trials. They had been tried together in 2005 and 2006.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Concerned by missteps that have left some Baltimore arrestees waiting in jail for weeks before seeing a judge, the public defender's office is pushing a plan to reduce the role prosecutors play in bringing suspects to court. Dozens of defendants have faced lengthy delays in high-profile cases initiated by the office of Baltimore City State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein, and lawmakers are calling for reforms as officials debate how to improve the process without weakening prosecutors' ability to crack down on violent gangs.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
In August, Lee Hull put all of his eggs in Robert Council's basket when the rookie head coach tabbed the redshirt senior as Morgan State's starting quarterback, and not even a poor showing in Saturday's 15-14 loss to Norfolk State has changed Hull's opinion. Council had his worst performance as a passer on Saturday, failing to complete 15 of his 19 attempts and gaining just 38 yards. He also lost a fumble on the Spartans' 1-yard line after a 12-yard run on the opening drive of the game for the Bears (2-3, 1-1 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference)
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
A week after he was critical of the Ravens' coverage breakdowns, defensive coordinator Dean Pees defended the play of starting safeties Matt Elam and Darian Stewart, saying he thought the team's secondary played well in the victory over the Carolina Panthers. “I think they're doing real well,” said Pees when asked specifically about the two safeties. “I'll admit that I don't think we played very well on the back end in the Cleveland game, and that was a lot of guys. It's never one guy. There are a lot of things that happen there and it wasn't just Matt and it wasn't just Stew.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | September 22, 2014
Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti better not be lying. He left himself open to be put in the same class as former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling on Monday after a nearly 50-minute press conference in which he disputed a recently published report by ESPN challenging the integrity of his franchise. Bisciotti was what you want an owner to be in this situation. He was feisty, defiant, combative and apologetic at times, and repeated his denial of not having seen the second video of running back Ray Rice his wife in an elevator until seven months after the incident.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
Ravens coach John Harbaugh was asked after the team's 23-21 win over the Cleveland Browns whether a recent report that he wanted to release former running back Ray Rice shortly after his Feburary domestic violence arrest was true. Harbaugh initially didn't answer, calling it a "football day," and said he would address it Monday. Then he elaborated, and defended how the team handled the situation. Here is his full comment on the ESPN report: "This is a football day, Jeff.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Baltimore County police have charged a civilian employee who worked in the department's Criminal Investigation Division after detectives found marijuana in her home Wednesday. Investigators searched the home of Susan M. Burke on Glenback Avenue in Pikesville Wednesday morning, where they found marijuana and drug paraphernalia in the house, police wrote in charging documents. Among the items found were grinders, scales, smoking pipes and a mason jar with plant residue, among other items for marijuana use. Police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said Burke will be reassigned to another county government position.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
A Baltimore judge this week ruled to allow city prosecutors to withhold identifying witness information from defendants in the sweeping case against alleged members of the Black Guerrilla Family gang. Judge Sylvester B. Cox on Tuesday granted a protective order, requested by the state's attorney's office, on any materials that could expose witnesses to harm or intimidation, after hearing a detective describe the fears witnesses had about cooperating with the investigation. Forty-eight suspects accused of being members of the BGF gang, which operated a violent, widespread drug trade in the city and corrupted the Baltimore City Detention Center, were indicted last November.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
Opening statements began yesterday in the trial of a Marine Corps lance corporal charged with driving a getaway car for a gang of robbers who killed a Belair Road gun shop owner and stole 43 handguns.Lance Cpl. Keith Bradford, 22, on leave at the time of the Sept. 11 robbery, faces charges of felony murder, attempted murder and conspiracy to commit armed robbery.Charles E. Scheuerman, 53, owner of the Northeast Gun Shop in the 4900 block of Belair Road, was shot in the chest after saying, "May I help you?"
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2010
A 25-year-old Rosedale man, one of five men federally charged in a series of armed home invasions, pleaded guilty to the conspiracy in federal court Wednesday. Trials for the four remaining defendants are pending. Antowan Bell, a.k.a. "Antwone Bell," and three others conspired to rob the owner of the Sparrow's Point Restaurant at the man's home in September 2009, using a fake law enforcement badge to gain entry and handcuffing the victim to a kitchen chair, according to the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
A law professor who is teaching Maryland's public defenders to better serve their poor clients amid "crushing" caseloads is among the winners of this year's MacArthur Foundation "genius" grants. As founder of the Atlanta-based organization Gideon's Promise, Jonathan Rapping works to train public defenders and help reform what he considers civil rights abuses in the criminal justice system. He arrived in Baltimore in May for a year-long stint at the Maryland Office of the Public Defender, his first attempt at changing a statewide system.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2014
A man accused of fatally stabbing his ex-girlfriend in 2013 was unable to attend his own trial in Baltimore County Tuesday after he refused to wear a stun cuff. Jeffrey Matthew Shiflett, 35, charged with murdering Katie Hadel, 33, missed opening statements after Circuit Judge Ruth Ann Jakubowski ordered that he wear an ankle bracelet that can deliver an electric shock. Jakubowski made the order after Shiflett screamed the judge's first name repeatedly and attempted to enter her chambers as he was being escorted to the courtroom before the trial.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.