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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2012
Nearly four months after signing Cuban defector Henry Urrutia, the Orioles are still waiting for the 25-year-old outfielder to officially join the organization, according to an industry source. Urrutia, who has set up residency in the Dominican Republic, continues to have difficulty obtaining a visa, an obstacle that has existed since the Orioles signed him in July. The Orioles had hoped Urrutia would arrive in time to get some minor league at bats at the Double-A level. Even after the season ended, the hope was to get Urrutia into to the team's spring training complex in Sarasota, Fla., to begin workouts.
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By Alejandro Zuniga, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
What do you do when the small speedboat you're using to escape illegally from Cuba runs out of fuel partway through the Gulf of Mexico? The vessel rocks uncomfortably atop large waves. You haven't eaten in days. You know what could happen if you're caught. You fear the worst. "The first thought was, 'Wow, I went through so much just to die on the edge,'" Dariel Alvarez, 25, recalled recently in Spanish. "I was scared to come so far and fall short. " Two years later, the Triple-A Norfolk outfielder is one of the Orioles' rising position prospects, combining a steady glove in the outfield with an electrifying plate presence.
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By Los Angeles Times | June 4, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A senior Iraqi nuclear scientist has defected to the United States and told Pentagon experts that a significant part of Saddam Hussein's nuclear research facilities survived U.S. bombing raids during the Persian Gulf war, officials said yesterday.The defector, who reportedly drove up to a U.S. military checkpoint in northern Iraq last month and asked for asylum, is being debriefed by U.S. officials as part of a wider effort to determine how much nuclear material Iraq still has and whether Mr. Hussein's regime is still capable of developing a nuclear weapon.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
When the Orioles claimed catcher Luis Martinez last week, placing four catchers on their 40-man roster, I received a number of inquiries about why the organization needed to protect so many backstops. It is rare to have that many, but the Orioles have been looking to improve organizational catching depth this offseason. Keep in mind that last year, the club's catching was thin enough that non-roster invitee Ronny Paulino, who arrived to spring training three weeks late, made the Orioles' Opening Day roster as the backup catcher.
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By Los Angeles Times | November 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The search for soldiers still listed as missing in action from the Vietnam War is being expanded to Czechoslovakia and the files of other East European countries as a result of information from a high-level Czech military defector, who has told Senate investigators that U.S. POWs spent time in Czech hospitals before being sent to the former Soviet Union.According to a confidential memorandum prepared for the Senate Select Committee on POW-MIA Affairs, a former Czech general who now works for the Defense Intelligence Agency has said that before his 1968 defection, he saw intelligence reports on at least two groups of POWs, each numbering about 25 men, who passed through Czech hospitals en route to Soviet imprisonment.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | June 15, 1994
White Deer, Pa. -- Once, when he was young, angry and scared, Arnold Topazov broke free from the Soviet military and climbed across two heavily fortified fences and a ditch, scaling the Berlin Wall years before anyone dreamed that it would ever come tumbling down.He packed lightly then, an unlikely defector carrying communications secrets, a pocketful of coins and big dreams on a journey that would take him to the inner sanctum of the Central Intelligence Agency.But now, years later, Topazov can be found on a hilltop behind another barricade made of concrete and wire at the medium security federal penitentiary at Allenwood.
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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 4, 1998
MIAMI -- The Soviet Union knew U.S. battle plans in the Persian Gulf war in 1991, including the surprise "left hook" into Iraq, through an electronic spy network anchored in Cuba, a Russian defector says.Moscow did not leak the plans to Baghdad at the time, the defector said. But improved Russian-Iraqi relations these days may lead Moscow to be more friendly to President Saddam Hussein if U.S. troops plan to attack Iraq again.Moscow's Lourdes spy center in Cuba is far bigger than publicly known, the defector added, a "monster" that collates data intercepted by Russian spy satellites, ships and planes in the entire Atlantic region.
NEWS
By Kate McNaboe | July 19, 2009
"The Defector" Daniel Silvia (Putnam, $26.95) During art restorer Gabriel Allon's relaxing honeymoon in Umbria, he receives news that Russian defector and friend Grigori Bulganov has disappeared. Gabriel is drawn back into a life of assassins and spies and put directly in the path of former KGB agent and arms dealer Ivan Kharkov. Now Gabriel must clear Bulganov's name while protecting himself and the one thing dearest to him. "Storm Cycle" Iris Johansen and Roy Johansen (St. Martin's, $26.99)
NEWS
By William Safire | July 30, 1991
Washington -- A TALENTED and beautiful artist is murdered on the towpath along the canal in Georgetown. She is the former wife of a CIA station chief and the illicit love of the president of the United States.Partly to investigate what he suspected may have been Soviet complicity in the murder (unsolved to this day) but primarily to protect the president's reputation, the chief of counterespionage for the agency -- an angular warrior who reads poetry and raises orchids -- rushes to her home ahead of the police.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | April 5, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - Have I got a spy story for you. It takes place just before the Iraq war. It reads like a thriller, except you can't believe the spooks in the story could be so clumsy. The most hair-raising chapter tells the tale of a defector named Curveball, who duped the United States into believing that Iraq had mobile germ-warfare labs. The saddest part of the tale is that it's all true. I refer to Thursday's report by the presidential commission that has been examining the ability of U.S. spy agencies to find foreign weapons of mass destruction.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- The Orioles are confident that their five-month wait for Cuban defector Henry Urrutia, stuck in Haiti unable to play because of visa issues, will end within the next two weeks. Urrutia, a 25-year-old corner outfielder, has established residency in Haiti and has been awaiting a visa there for since the Orioles signed him to a minor league contract in July. The club paid Urrutia a $778,500 signing bonus. Fred Ferreira, the Orioles executive director for international recruiting, said that Urrutia recently made huge strides toward obtaining a visa with the help of the United States ambassador to Haiti.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2012
Nearly four months after signing Cuban defector Henry Urrutia, the Orioles are still waiting for the 25-year-old outfielder to officially join the organization, according to an industry source. Urrutia, who has set up residency in the Dominican Republic, continues to have difficulty obtaining a visa, an obstacle that has existed since the Orioles signed him in July. The Orioles had hoped Urrutia would arrive in time to get some minor league at bats at the Double-A level. Even after the season ended, the hope was to get Urrutia into to the team's spring training complex in Sarasota, Fla., to begin workouts.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
The word from around the Warehouse is that the Orioles aren't done with their winter shopping. The club has made some significant moves, most notably making a run in the international market for starting pitching by acquiring Japanese pitcher Tsuyoshi Wada and Taiwanese pitcher Wei-Yin Chen. But executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette has made it clear the Orioles are still active in improving the club for 2012 and beyond. It's unclear whether the best options will come via trade or through the free-agent market, which has cooled in recent days.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 30, 2011
It isn't wedding bells that are breaking up that old gang of mine. But it has started to happen, just as I've been afraid it would. Susan and her husband, Fred, are the first to defect, returning to their New England roots, in part to be near family members who need them. And I have to say I didn't see this one coming. I thought it might be Ruth who would leave our Annapolis neighborhood first. She has talked about giving up her house and traveling with her dog. Or Bob and Patty across the street.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Peter Schmuck | December 10, 2009
- The Orioles are expected to take the next step in their wooing of free-agent pitcher and Cuban defector Aroldis Chapman next week when international scouting director John Stockstill travels to Houston to meet with the pitcher's agents, Alan and Randy Hendricks . Stockstill and Orioles president of baseball operations Andy MacPhail also met with the Hendricks brothers Tuesday, the second day of the winter meetings....
NEWS
By Kate McNaboe | July 19, 2009
"The Defector" Daniel Silvia (Putnam, $26.95) During art restorer Gabriel Allon's relaxing honeymoon in Umbria, he receives news that Russian defector and friend Grigori Bulganov has disappeared. Gabriel is drawn back into a life of assassins and spies and put directly in the path of former KGB agent and arms dealer Ivan Kharkov. Now Gabriel must clear Bulganov's name while protecting himself and the one thing dearest to him. "Storm Cycle" Iris Johansen and Roy Johansen (St. Martin's, $26.99)
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | January 16, 1991
The assassination of three Palestinian guerrilla leaders, including Yasser Arafat's second-in-command, was the work of notorious terrorist Abu Nidal, both Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization now agree.Abu Nidal's involvement in the killings seemed to lift the possibility that the assassinations would disrupt the delicate U.S.-Arab alliance poised for war against Iraq. But it raised intriguing questions about the Byzantine nature of alliances in the Arab world.Both Abu Nidal, perhaps the world's most infamous terrorist, and Arafat's PLO have aligned themselves with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
The word from around the Warehouse is that the Orioles aren't done with their winter shopping. The club has made some significant moves, most notably making a run in the international market for starting pitching by acquiring Japanese pitcher Tsuyoshi Wada and Taiwanese pitcher Wei-Yin Chen. But executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette has made it clear the Orioles are still active in improving the club for 2012 and beyond. It's unclear whether the best options will come via trade or through the free-agent market, which has cooled in recent days.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | April 5, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - Have I got a spy story for you. It takes place just before the Iraq war. It reads like a thriller, except you can't believe the spooks in the story could be so clumsy. The most hair-raising chapter tells the tale of a defector named Curveball, who duped the United States into believing that Iraq had mobile germ-warfare labs. The saddest part of the tale is that it's all true. I refer to Thursday's report by the presidential commission that has been examining the ability of U.S. spy agencies to find foreign weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 19, 2005
SEOUL, South Korea - In a brutal new crackdown on defections and smuggling to China, North Korea has conducted public executions of at least three people and possibly dozens more, according to human rights advocates who have examined a recently obtained videotape. The grainy footage is believed to show firing squads executing alleged human traffickers in front of large crowds in Hoeryong, a North Korean border town that has been a major transit point for tens of thousands of people escaping their impoverished homeland.
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