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NEWS
March 28, 2012
Once again, The Sun endorses its favored candidate, U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin, by refusing to cover any of the other contenders in the race. The rest of us can just go pound sand. In 2010, The Sun tossed us underdogs a bone in the form of an online blog but no print coverage. This year, it's an equally worthless online election guide. So much for fairness and participatory democracy. With no surprises left, The Sun will endorse Senator Cardin over the GOP nominee again this fall, even if Mr. Cardin drops dead in the meantime.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 8, 2014
Howard County's history of raising public health standards in our community is reflected in our consistent ranking among the most healthy counties in the nation. Recently, US News ranked us the 13th healthiest place for children. Quite a distinction! But we can do even better, and one of the ways we can address our most persistent public health threats is with forward-thinking policies that make healthy choices the easy and default choices in our community - policies like the nutritional standards the Howard County government has implemented on food and drinks sold on public property or at county-sponsored events ( "Howard vendors question rules on festival fare," July 2)
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NEWS
July 14, 2011
"White House sounds alarm" is the headline for an article in The Sun ( July 13). "Obama says checks might not go out unless deal is made. " Later in the story it says "Republicans have said the Treasury should prioritize its bills. " I agree completely. If a deal isn't made, the first checks that should not go out are for the senators and congressmen who are grandstanding to make political points, not working for what's best for the country. Shame on all of them. David Gosey, Towson
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
For The Atlantic  the distinguished linguist Geoffrey Nunberg has produced an article, "When Slang Becomes a Slur,"  about the controversy over the name of the Washington Redskins.  Don't pass over it without clicking. It is a thoughtful, substantial article that moves from the controversy over the team name to a deeper understanding of the interplay between language and culture. (You'd be better off reading that than this.)  Mr. Nunberg looks at a number of derogatory words that used to be in common use but which over the past half-century have come to be shunned as unacceptable for public discourse, and labeled as such in dictionaries.  Here's a salient paragraph: " That all started to change in the '60s, though it took dictionaries a while to catch up. The sea change in social attitudes that led to the civil rights acts of 1964 and 1965 also transformed the way we talked about race and ethnicity.
NEWS
September 6, 2011
I sympathize with the letter Dovey Kahn wrote in today's Baltimore Sun ("Obama by default," Sept. 6). Just as some will hold their nose and vote for President Obama in 2012, I held my nose and voted for John McCain in 2008, and I'll likely be holding my nose again in 2012. I'm a tea party guy, which means I want less spending, smaller government and someone who'll balance the books. That means I won't be voting for President Obama. But I'm also agnostic, pro-gay marriage, pro-abortion, and I detest our involvement in wars we have no business being part of. That makes Republican candidates like Texas Gov. Rick Perry Rep. Michele Bachmann and Sen. Rick Santorum the lesser of two evils in a matchup versus President Obama.
NEWS
July 8, 2014
Howard County's history of raising public health standards in our community is reflected in our consistent ranking among the most healthy counties in the nation. Recently, US News ranked us the 13th healthiest place for children. Quite a distinction! But we can do even better, and one of the ways we can address our most persistent public health threats is with forward-thinking policies that make healthy choices the easy and default choices in our community - policies like the nutritional standards the Howard County government has implemented on food and drinks sold on public property or at county-sponsored events ( "Howard vendors question rules on festival fare," July 2)
NEWS
By David W. Wise | October 3, 2013
In spite of opposition by 72 percent of the American public, Republican members of the House of Representatives have driven the government, and possibly the economy, over the shutdown cliff. More ominous is their threat not to agree to an increase in the national debt ceiling in two weeks, an unprecedented move that would put the United States — until now viewed by the world as the ultimate safe haven — into default. Such a default, even if resolved, would not only complicate the ability to finance the U.S. government and increase its borrowing costs but would also speed up a shift away from the dollar as the primary reserve currency and the United States as a place to invest.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 6, 2008
Employers rushing to automatically enroll workers in retirement plans and directing the money to one-stop life-cycle funds are leaving old-fashioned investment advice behind in a cloud of so much dust. That may be a mistake, say advice providers, who are trotting out performance figures that seem to make the case for giving workers access to more advice, not less. While about half of workplace retirement plans offer advice and an equal number automatically enroll workers into a default investment option, the default system is the one with all the momentum, said David Wray, president of the Profit Sharing/401(k)
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2011
One of Baltimore's largest providers of drug treatment services is in default on loans of up to $2.5 million, its bank says, raising questions about the financial well-being of a clinic that treats hundreds of addicts in the city. Bank of America is suing Baltimore Behavioral Health Inc. for access to its financial records, alleging that the West Pratt Street clinic is in default and has refused to provide "critical financial information. " The bank also claims that clinic funds paid for board members' monthly spa services, boat repairs and personal mortgage payments, an accusation that one BBH board member dismissed as unsupported "hype.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | November 10, 1990
NEW YORK -- Maryland Cable Corp., the Prince George's County cable television operator, defaulted on its bank loans yesterday after extended negotiations with bankers to secure a waiver on principal repayment of its $92 million bank loan failed.The company has been given 30 days by a bank syndicate led by Citicorp to devise a comprehensive restructuring plan on its debt. In the meantime, service will continue for all subscribers."There will be no impact on our customers or our business," said John Motulsky, senior vice president for MultiVision, the Greenwich, Conn.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2014
The Dolan Co., owner of The Daily Record in Baltimore, has signaled financial distress by hiring a restructuring officer, deciding against paying a dividend and disclosing that it received a warning from the New York Stock Exchange over its low stock price. The Minneapolis-based professional services and business information firm made all three announcements in the last several weeks. Dolan said its new chief restructuring officer, Kevin Nystrom of Zolfo Cooper, will work to "stabilize" its finances.
NEWS
October 24, 2013
I am amazed that some people are so myopic that they can't bring themselves to listen to the financial experts on matters such as the prospect of a U.S. default on its debts (" A deal, three weeks too late," Oct. 17). It is no secret that a default would have been catastrophic for our economy. The shutdown itself caused untold damage to millions of citizens, and I hate to think what additional damage a default would have brought. Some readers must be getting their "knowledge" from Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity and Mark Levin.
NEWS
October 9, 2013
The latest out of the extreme conservative wing of the Republican party is that a failure of the U.S. government to take the steps necessary to pay all its bills on time would be no biggie. They say we could juggle things around and avoid missing any payments on the debt, which they figure is the only thing our creditors really care about. Some, such as Sen. Rand Paul, go a step further and say failure to raise the government's borrowing limit might be a blessing: "If you don't raise the debt limit," he told the New York Times, "all you're saying is, 'We're going to be balancing the budget.'" Um, no. What you're saying is that the federal government is going to start picking and choosing which bills to pay. Depending on the vagaries of cash flow, maybe today the military doesn't get paid, maybe tomorrow Social Security checks don't go out, or maybe Medicare can't cover its bills.
NEWS
By David W. Wise | October 3, 2013
In spite of opposition by 72 percent of the American public, Republican members of the House of Representatives have driven the government, and possibly the economy, over the shutdown cliff. More ominous is their threat not to agree to an increase in the national debt ceiling in two weeks, an unprecedented move that would put the United States — until now viewed by the world as the ultimate safe haven — into default. Such a default, even if resolved, would not only complicate the ability to finance the U.S. government and increase its borrowing costs but would also speed up a shift away from the dollar as the primary reserve currency and the United States as a place to invest.
NEWS
August 3, 2012
Could it be that President Barack Obama's best chance for re-election in November is ... Mitt Romney? The dismal state of the economy, and especially the stagnant high unemployment rate, clearly are red flags for Mr. Obama's hopes of retaining the White House. And the similar crisis in Europe is no help either. So it may be that the American public's continuing doubts about Mr. Romney will in the end give the president another four-year lease. That possibility helps explain why the Obama campaign and its super PAC allies have been hammering so hard on Mr. Romney's claim to be a Mr. Fix-It of the business world.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2012
Reactions to Robert Lane Greene's post at Johnson  on split infinitives  got me to thinking about the One Way Only crowd.  Specifically, it was a comment by David M. Rowe: Yes, avoiding split infinitives at all cost can be labored and pedantic. Making them the default usage, however, reduces an authors tone to the level of over-hyped consultants' jargon. ("Our model allows you to rapidly, effectively and inexpensively improve your forecasts. " Ugh!
BUSINESS
By David Conn | August 31, 1991
The developer of the Harbour Gates apartment complex in Annapolis has gone into default on its construction loan, tenants learned this month, and the bank has scheduled a foreclosure sale for next month.Residents of the 516-unit development, on Bestgate Road near the Annapolis Mall, received notice from attorneys for the project's lender that all rent payments should be made to an agent for the bank, San Diego-based HomeFed Bank.Unless HomeFed and the developer, Catwil Corp. of Stockton, Calif.
NEWS
March 28, 2012
Once again, The Sun endorses its favored candidate, U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin, by refusing to cover any of the other contenders in the race. The rest of us can just go pound sand. In 2010, The Sun tossed us underdogs a bone in the form of an online blog but no print coverage. This year, it's an equally worthless online election guide. So much for fairness and participatory democracy. With no surprises left, The Sun will endorse Senator Cardin over the GOP nominee again this fall, even if Mr. Cardin drops dead in the meantime.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
Baltimore Behavioral Health Inc. has sold its West Pratt Street campus to an affiliate of the Abell Foundation for $3 million, according to a recently filed deed, a move that the struggling mental health clinic had long sought as a way to help stabilize its finances. BBH will continue to operate at the Pratt Street location by leasing space in one of the two buildings there. The University of Maryland Medical Center will rent part of a second building for a program that it runs for the Baltimore City Office of Addiction Services.
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