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By Soren Baker and Soren Baker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 31, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Joe Clair understands the importance of laughter.Before he became a professional comedian and the host of BET's "Rap City," he used his optimism and good humor to help kids succeed.After graduating with a bachelor of science degree in psychology from Morgan State University in 1992, Clair, who performs Saturday night as part of Def Comedy Jam at Pier Six, began working with homeless teen-agers in Landover. He instilled hope into kids who often lacked support and motivation."I had just gotten out of college, and I was real amped about being able to do things independently," said Clair, who was in Washington Monday night as host of a Def Comedy Jam talent search at Takoma Station Tavern.
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By Soren Baker and Soren Baker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 31, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Joe Clair understands the importance of laughter.Before he became a professional comedian and the host of BET's "Rap City," he used his optimism and good humor to help kids succeed.After graduating with a bachelor of science degree in psychology from Morgan State University in 1992, Clair, who performs Saturday night as part of Def Comedy Jam at Pier Six, began working with homeless teen-agers in Landover. He instilled hope into kids who often lacked support and motivation."I had just gotten out of college, and I was real amped about being able to do things independently," said Clair, who was in Washington Monday night as host of a Def Comedy Jam talent search at Takoma Station Tavern.
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By Los Angeles Times | August 7, 1992
Hollywood -- Atorrent of rap music fills the packed theater and a sea of fists pumps the air as emcee Martin Lawrence swaggers confidently on stage and yells, "Yo, whassup, black people, whassup?"A sharply dressed comedian surveys the crowd and proclaims: "Fellas, give it up for the ladies in the house! Let the dogs loose!" followed by a sustained chorus of "woofs" deeper and more sustained than any ever heard on the Arsenio Hall show.Another comic describes his southeastern Washington state neighborhood: "It's like three Harlems and half a Bronx . . . my neighborhood's so bad that the mailman just leaves the mail on the corner and lets you sort it out."
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By Los Angeles Times | August 7, 1992
Hollywood -- Atorrent of rap music fills the packed theater and a sea of fists pumps the air as emcee Martin Lawrence swaggers confidently on stage and yells, "Yo, whassup, black people, whassup?"A sharply dressed comedian surveys the crowd and proclaims: "Fellas, give it up for the ladies in the house! Let the dogs loose!" followed by a sustained chorus of "woofs" deeper and more sustained than any ever heard on the Arsenio Hall show.Another comic describes his southeastern Washington state neighborhood: "It's like three Harlems and half a Bronx . . . my neighborhood's so bad that the mailman just leaves the mail on the corner and lets you sort it out."
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | March 5, 1992
If laughter really is the best medicine, the best kind of cultural medicine transcends differences rather than accentuates them.That seems the fairest reaction to "Def Comedy Jam," a new eight-week series arriving on the HBO cable network tomorrow at midnight.What? Another stand-up comedy show? Yes, but this one's segregated.Put together by Russell Simmons, the creator of the Def Jam rap music label, the half-hour show purports to bring to TV for the first time a collection of "raw and raunchy" comics who play the black comedy/rap club circuit.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | September 18, 1992
Advisory: Bill Bellamy says the "The Def Comedy Jam Tour," in Baltimore for two sold-out shows at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall tomorrow night, offers the same material as the weekly HBO show "Russell Simmons' Def Comedy Jam." There's just more of it."People know what to expect. . . . I don't think anybody will be offended," says the 25-year-old headliner of the uninhibited four-performer show. "The difference is in the time. We're each on stage a lot longer."When "Def Comedy Jam" premiered in March on HBO, it was promoted as a "raw and raunchy" showcase for black comedians doing uncensored material that dictated a midnight screening.
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By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,Special to The Sun | June 22, 1994
"Is this Baltimore?" comedian Chris Tucker asks midway through his phone conversation. The 22-year-old comic, who is appearing tomorrow at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, is calling from his home state of Georgia, and he sounds a little tired and half asleep.He swears he didn't just wake up at 2 in the afternoon, but for a man who describes his comedic stylings as "explosive and powerful," Mr. Tucker sounds laid back. Almost too laid back -- especially for a man who is best known for his appearances on HBO's "Def Comedy Jam."
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By Gregory Lewis and Gregory Lewis,San Francisco Examiner | February 11, 1994
"Your mother is so ugly," said Alonzo "Hamburger" Longhorn on a recent Uptown Comedy Club TV show, "when she moved into her new apartment, the neighbors chipped in to buy her curtains."The lowdown, funky, nasty Dirty Dozens is back in vogue.The dozens is a game of verbal combat, played mostly by black males on street corners. It is designed to teach participants to maintain control and keep cool under adverse circumstances."We played the dozens for recreation, like white folks play Scrabble," H. Rap Brown once said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [AARON CHESTER] | November 8, 2007
The lowdown -- Comedian Mike Epps, known for his Def Comedy Jam broadcasts and appearances in both Friday sequels, brings his no-holds-barred act to the Lyric Opera House tomorrow. Epps began his comedic act as a teenager, rising to fame after he moved to Atlanta and worked at the Comedy Act Theater. If you go -- The show is at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the Lyric Opera House, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave. Tickets are $42.75- $55.75. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticket master.com. Rock bands The lowdown -- Don't miss Mayday Parade, Powerspace, We The Kings and Madina Lake at the Ottobar on Sunday.
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By Los Angeles Times | January 11, 1994
Bill Bellamy has a way of looking into the camera and addressing just you. It doesn't matter if he's introducing the latest Salt N' Pepa video or interviewing Janet Jackson. There's something about the way he laughs, moves and makes eye contact that tells you you've been singled out of the audience.Unlike many of his fellow comedians, the MTV veejay veers away from graphic sexual material, opting instead for what he calls "a lot of topical stuff, observational stuff.""I try to make people see the lighter side of things," says Mr. Bellamy,26, who started out as a stand-up comedian.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | March 5, 1992
If laughter really is the best medicine, the best kind of cultural medicine transcends differences rather than accentuates them.That seems the fairest reaction to "Def Comedy Jam," a new eight-week series arriving on the HBO cable network tomorrow at midnight.What? Another stand-up comedy show? Yes, but this one's segregated.Put together by Russell Simmons, the creator of the Def Jam rap music label, the half-hour show purports to bring to TV for the first time a collection of "raw and raunchy" comics who play the black comedy/rap club circuit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | June 3, 2004
Return of the Jaded Set The Jaded Set will get heavy tonight at the Ottobar. After moving to Olympia, Wash., and recording two releases for the Vox Climantis label, the quirky duo returned to Charm City - and will play its first local show in months when it opens for the Start and Ego Likeness. The Drowning Season is also billed. Doors open at 8 p.m. for this all-ages show. Tickets are $8. The Ottobar is at 2549 N. Howard St. Call 410-662-0069 or visit www.theottobar.com. Jazz at Oakland Enjoy a night of jazz Saturday at Historic Oakland in Columbia.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley | August 11, 1995
ARTHUR RHODESCareer recordIs pitching out of the bullpen for the first time in his major-league career. Debuted as an Oriole in 1991. Led the organization in 1994 with six complete games -- three with the Orioles and three with Triple-A Rochester.Personal recordBorn in and raised in Waco, Texas. Now resides in Sarasota, Fla. Turns 26 on Oct. 24. Is married to the former Kerry Garrett; they have two children, Trey, 6, and Jade Ashlee, 1 1/2 . Played baseball and football at LaVega High. His older brother, Ricky, was the New York Yankees' 35th-round draft pick in 1988 and pitched five minor-league seasons.
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