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By New York Times News Service | July 23, 1991
At the height of the bug season, officials in New York are warning consumers not to use insect repellents with high levels of the chemical DEET because of health risks. They are also proposing that such products be banned.DEET-related health problems include skin rashes and scarring in adults and, in a few cases, reports of neurological problems in children. A ban would affect products that are more than 30 percent DEET.New York is the first state to propose such a ban. Makers of the repellent oppose a ban."
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NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 13, 2012
It was plain to see that the mild winter and warm spring had flowers and trees blooming ahead of schedule in March and April. Less easy to see are the ticks and other insects that came with them - unless you're swatting them away. Tick season got an early start this year by as much as three to four weeks, said Michael Raupp, a professor of entomology at the University of Maryland, College Park. Similarly, the mild winter and early spring heat stirred other insects, like mosquitoes, mites and stink bugs, he said.
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro | May 26, 1992
DEET (diethyltoluamide) is a highly effective repellent used against insects and ticks in products such as Cutter's and Off! It is also a highly controversial repellent reported to have caused adverse reactions after repeated use. Most complaints involve skin or eye irritation, but DEET, which is absorbed into the bloodstream, has also been implicated in causing seizures and comas in children."
NEWS
Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
State inspectors say mosquito counts have tripled in parts of Baltimore County since heavy rains from Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee hit the area. "The mosquitoes on the wing now are quite annoying," said Mike Cantwell, chief of mosquito control at the Maryland Department of Agriculture. They're mostly fresh floodwater breeders, especially our native Aedes vexans . "They are persistent biters, and go after mammals and birds," he said. "They are very active in the periods after sundown and, in shaded areas, they won't even wait until sundown," he said.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro | May 26, 1992
DEET (diethyltoluamide) is a highly effective repellent used against insects and ticks in products such as Cutter's and Off! It is also a highly controversial repellent reported to have caused adverse reactions after repeated use. Most complaints involve skin or eye irritation, but DEET, which is absorbed into the bloodstream, has also been implicated in causing seizures and comas in children."
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | July 10, 2005
Is there a product containing both sunscreen and bug control (DEET) on the market? Are there any problems applying sunscreen and then 25 percent DEET spray? Several combination products with both insect repellent and sunscreen are available. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention doesn't recommend them because "sunscreen requires frequent applications while DEET should be used sparingly." Recent research shows another problem with such combination products (British Journal of Dermatology, June 2005)
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | September 8, 2002
Q. Whenever I turn on the television and see another report about West Nile virus, it scares me. I live in Florida and play golf at least three times a week and also work outside in the yard. The mosquitoes are voracious, so I apply lots of DEET insect repellent to my legs, ankles, arms, face, neck, socks and shirt. I try not to inhale the stuff, but I know I breathe in some of it. I worry about using so much DEET and would like some alternative approaches. A. According to public health authorities, DEET is the most effective repellent available.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon & Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon & Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | July 6, 2003
I would like your recommendation for a natural insect repellent. Now that the mosquitoes are buzzing again, I want something to reduce the threat of West Nile virus. Nothing's as effective as the chemical DEET when it comes to repelling mosquitoes. According to an article in the New England Journal of Medicine last year, the best natural product is Bite Blocker, a repellent containing soybean oil, coconut oil and geranium oil. The authors report that it provides about 90 minutes of protection, but that falls far short of DEET-containing repellents.
NEWS
By Diane Suchetka and Diane Suchetka,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 14, 2002
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - A professor at North Carolina State University says he has discovered a mosquito repellent safer and more effective than DEET, a chemical now used by about a third of the U.S. population every year. Michael Roe found the natural compound by accident - on the foliage of wild tomatoes that grow in the mountains of Ecuador. And a Durham, N.C., company is about to begin selling his discovery, under the name "Skeeter Shield." "Everybody we talk to says, `Oh, my God, this is incredible,'" says Alan Brandt, president and chief operating officer of Insect Biotechnology Inc., which holds the license for use of the compound and will manufacture repellents that contain it. Mosquito experts across the country say they can't comment until they see results of field data on the substance.
FEATURES
By Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D | July 6, 1993
Q: I went to the store to buy insect repellent for my children. There are so many kinds -- what's the best? Or are they all the same?A: According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, the most effective insect repellents contain diethlytoluamide, which, fortunately for us, goes by the named DEET. Those products suitable for use on children should not contain more than 10 percent DEET, as this chemical is absorbed through the skin and can potentially cause harm. Read product labels carefully.
HEALTH
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
Summer is the time to enjoy the outdoors. There's the sun, the camping, the backyard crab feasts, and unfortunately, there's also the pests. Mosquitoes, ticks, bees and hornets can make themselves uninvited guests at outdoor gatherings and activities, inflicting pain, sparking allergic reactions, spreading disease and sucking the life from the party. Keeping the unwanted bugs at bay takes serious effort but consumers are not alone in the fight. A host of bug-off products are on the market: he usual sprays and rubs, as well as protective clothing and insect-repellent patches.
HEALTH
May 27, 2010
With Memorial Day approaching and school soon reaching an end, it's a good time to brush up on summer health and safety. Dr. Bill Zirkin of the Greater Baltimore Medical Center's emergency department talks about common summer issues and how to avoid them. Question: What are the warning signs of heatstroke or other heat-related illness? What are the best ways to avoid it? Answer: Heat-related illnesses, including heatstroke, which is the most severe condition caused by overheating, are caused by the body's inability to cool itself.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | August 2, 2009
When summer comes, DEET is my perfume. The only downside to taking a DEET bath to ward off mosquitoes is the fear that it kills brain cells as effectively as a Jonas Brothers concert. That, and it eats fishing line, plastic watchbands, tents and sleeping bags. You can't have everything. Natrapel, a bug spray with 20 percent Picaridin, does a pretty good job of keeping your blood inside your body. Used in Europe and Australia before being introduced here in 2005, Picaridin ("also known around the world as KBR3023," its Web site says)
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | September 28, 2008
A buzz. A belated slap. A welt. Despite the arrival of fall, mosquitoes are still among us. For many occasions in the great outdoors, only repellent containing DEET will do. But that active ingredient, the most effective defense, does a number on plastic, nylon and other materials (some insist brain cells, too). That used to leave anglers and others with a dilemma: damaged skin or damaged gear. There's an alternative. Natrapel 8 Hour Insect Repellent contains 20 percent picaridin, which with normal use "does not present a health concern to the general U.S. population" or quail or freshwater invertebrates, according to EPA testers.
FEATURES
May 29, 2008
Researchers have identified seven possibilities for the next generation of mosquito repellent, some of which may work several times longer than the current standard-bearer, DEET. The next step: safety testing to make sure they're not harmful. While the new repellents aren't likely to be available commercially for a few years, early tests on cloth were promising, with some chemicals repelling mosquitoes for as long as 73 days and many working for 40 days to 50 days, compared to an average of 17.5 days with DEET, according to a recent study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | September 9, 2007
The path to health can be measured in steps-10,000 of them a day, fitness experts advise. Polar's Activity Watch ($199, online; www.polarusa.com) wakes you up, counts your steps, estimates amount of effort and calories burned and keeps track of altitude ascent and descent - without breaking a sweat. And it does all this in an attractive, easy-to-read package that doesn't require a monitoring chest strap. Unlike a pedometer, the Polar gives you a customized reading. The case is rugged stainless steel and the strap is super secure.
FEATURES
May 29, 2008
Researchers have identified seven possibilities for the next generation of mosquito repellent, some of which may work several times longer than the current standard-bearer, DEET. The next step: safety testing to make sure they're not harmful. While the new repellents aren't likely to be available commercially for a few years, early tests on cloth were promising, with some chemicals repelling mosquitoes for as long as 73 days and many working for 40 days to 50 days, compared to an average of 17.5 days with DEET, according to a recent study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2002
SILVER SPRING -- Once each week, Wesley McCardell steps into a humid, brightly lighted room at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and bares his legs to be bitten by dozens of mosquitoes -- the same type that transmits diseases and kills millions of people worldwide. There is no danger that McCardell or the other volunteers will be infected with malaria, which kills 3 million people each year. Walter Reed's swarms are raised in laboratories and are disease-free. But bites from these anopheles stephensi can still cause itchy skin.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | July 1, 2007
On a woodsy hike, while bank fishing or just mowing the lawn, DEET, the powerful insect repellent, is a necessity. The problem is that using an aerosol applies DEET not only to skin, but also to surrounding things such as watch faces, sunglasses or fishing line, which melt or are badly damaged. Enter Ben's 30 Tick and Insect Repellent Wipes, which are saturated in a 30 percent DEET formula. The repellent is water-based instead of alcohol-based to minimize skin irritation and reduce that medicinal smell.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
When it comes to mosquitos, many of us fall into the category of "sweet meat," soft targets compared to the walking blood banks around us. Even if we slather on 100 percent DEET (destroying brain cells and anything plastic, like watch faces) there always remains a spot we forgot. Then we spend the night scratching like a junkyard dog with fleas. "After Bite" takes away the itch. The ammonia-based liquid doesn't smell good, but the odor dissipates as it dries. It not only works on mosquito bites but also the nibbles of horse flies and green-head flies.
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