Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDeepwater Horizon
IN THE NEWS

Deepwater Horizon

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2011
Scientists from the National Aquarium and the Johns Hopkins University say they've found low but potentially harmful levels of toxic oil contaminants in the Gulf of Mexico months after the Deepwater Horizon well blowout was capped. Erik Rifkin, interim executive director of the aquarium's conservation center, and Yongseok Hong, a post-doctoral fellow at Hopkins, say that using devices that mimic the way fish absorb contaminants in their environment, they've detected oil-related chemical compounds on the Louisiana coast that traditional water sampling methods mostly missed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has filed a lawsuit against oil company BP over investment losses following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon explosion, alleging that the state's pension fund lost millions after the company misled the public about its safety protocols. BP made "false and misleading statements regarding its commitment to safety reforms and oil spill prevention and response capabilities," Gansler said. He said those misstatements gave investors like the Maryland pension fund unwarranted confidence in the company, which should "be held accountable for the losses that have occurred.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | November 22, 2012
The Justice Department has entered into the largest criminal settlement in U.S. history with the giant oil company BP, in connection with the 2010 disaster in the Gulf of Mexico that killed 11 people and caused the worst oil spill in American history. BP pleaded guilty to 14 criminal counts, including manslaughter, and agreed to pay $4 billion over the next five years. This is nonsensical. BP isn't a criminal. Corporations aren't people. They can't know right from wrong. They're incapable of criminal intent.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | November 22, 2012
The Justice Department has entered into the largest criminal settlement in U.S. history with the giant oil company BP, in connection with the 2010 disaster in the Gulf of Mexico that killed 11 people and caused the worst oil spill in American history. BP pleaded guilty to 14 criminal counts, including manslaughter, and agreed to pay $4 billion over the next five years. This is nonsensical. BP isn't a criminal. Corporations aren't people. They can't know right from wrong. They're incapable of criminal intent.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | April 23, 2012
The Obama administration's move to open the mid- and South Atlantic coasts to offshore oil and gas exploration is scheduled to get a public airing in Annapolis on Wednesday. The Annapolis session is one of a series being held from Florida to New Jersey to take public comments on the Interior Department's proposal to permit seismic and other testing off the Atlantic coast from Delaware Bay to just south of Cape Canaveral, FL The administration had proposed lifting the long-standing ban on Atlantic offshore exploration in 2010, but then reinstated it in the wake of the massive Deepwater Horizon drilling rig blowout in the Gulf of Mexico.  Last month, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced Atlantic testing was back on as part of President Obama's "all-of-the-above" energy strategy.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has filed a lawsuit against oil company BP over investment losses following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon explosion, alleging that the state's pension fund lost millions after the company misled the public about its safety protocols. BP made "false and misleading statements regarding its commitment to safety reforms and oil spill prevention and response capabilities," Gansler said. He said those misstatements gave investors like the Maryland pension fund unwarranted confidence in the company, which should "be held accountable for the losses that have occurred.
NEWS
October 10, 2010
Days after the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded and sank in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, officials at BP were still assuring the Obama administration their estimates showed the blown-out well was only leaking about 5,000 barrels of oil a day into the surrounding waters. That was the figure the administration initially used to describe one of the worst environmental disasters in U.S. history, even though other government experts and independent scientists were already warning that the spill was likely much larger than oil company officials were letting on. In the weeks and months that followed, the government repeatedly underestimated the size of the spill, giving the public a distorted impression of the extent of the damage while making its own and BP's efforts to contain the oil seem more effective than they actually were.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2010
This campaign flier gets your attention. On one side, the mailing from Baltimore County executive candidate Kevin Kamenetz shows an offshore oil rig engulfed in flames. The text says the Gulf of Mexico disaster is going to cost BP billions. On the other side is an image of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge. If the disaster happened here, the flier claims, Joseph Bartenfelder would cap BP's liability at $10 million - "And we would be left to clean up the mess. " Kamenetz's shot at his fellow Democrat's environmental record as a member of the Maryland House of Delegates is powerful, but also misleading.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
The oil rig blowout in the Gulf of Mexico may have pinched the supply of big Louisiana blue crabs that some Maryland restaurants rely upon, but there's apparently been no shortage of crustaceans to steam, crack and pick this summer, as the Chesapeake Bay has produced its best harvest in years. "We didn't need Louisiana crabs this year," said Larry W. Simns, president of the Maryland Watermen's Association. "We've got so many crabs now we can't sell them. " That's in part because "demand has been iffy" at times, said Jack Brooks, co-owner of the J.M. Clayton Co., a long-time seafood business in Cambridge that packs and ships 30,000 pounds of crabs and crabmeat daily from spring into fall.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2010
Looking out from his waterfront home in Fairhope, Ala., Frederick "Rick" T. Kuykendall III can see miles of boom protecting a coastline endangered by millions of gallons of oil pouring out of a well in the Gulf of Mexico. In all his years of environmental law, Kuykendall couldn't have expected that what may be his biggest case would happen in the region where he grew up. Kuykendall, 55, is a lawyer affiliated with the Murphy Firm in Baltimore, a prominent firm headed by Billy Murphy that specializes in complex commercial litigation.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | April 23, 2012
The Obama administration's move to open the mid- and South Atlantic coasts to offshore oil and gas exploration is scheduled to get a public airing in Annapolis on Wednesday. The Annapolis session is one of a series being held from Florida to New Jersey to take public comments on the Interior Department's proposal to permit seismic and other testing off the Atlantic coast from Delaware Bay to just south of Cape Canaveral, FL The administration had proposed lifting the long-standing ban on Atlantic offshore exploration in 2010, but then reinstated it in the wake of the massive Deepwater Horizon drilling rig blowout in the Gulf of Mexico.  Last month, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced Atlantic testing was back on as part of President Obama's "all-of-the-above" energy strategy.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2011
Scientists from the National Aquarium and the Johns Hopkins University say they've found low but potentially harmful levels of toxic oil contaminants in the Gulf of Mexico months after the Deepwater Horizon well blowout was capped. Erik Rifkin, interim executive director of the aquarium's conservation center, and Yongseok Hong, a post-doctoral fellow at Hopkins, say that using devices that mimic the way fish absorb contaminants in their environment, they've detected oil-related chemical compounds on the Louisiana coast that traditional water sampling methods mostly missed.
NEWS
October 10, 2010
Days after the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded and sank in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, officials at BP were still assuring the Obama administration their estimates showed the blown-out well was only leaking about 5,000 barrels of oil a day into the surrounding waters. That was the figure the administration initially used to describe one of the worst environmental disasters in U.S. history, even though other government experts and independent scientists were already warning that the spill was likely much larger than oil company officials were letting on. In the weeks and months that followed, the government repeatedly underestimated the size of the spill, giving the public a distorted impression of the extent of the damage while making its own and BP's efforts to contain the oil seem more effective than they actually were.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
The oil rig blowout in the Gulf of Mexico may have pinched the supply of big Louisiana blue crabs that some Maryland restaurants rely upon, but there's apparently been no shortage of crustaceans to steam, crack and pick this summer, as the Chesapeake Bay has produced its best harvest in years. "We didn't need Louisiana crabs this year," said Larry W. Simns, president of the Maryland Watermen's Association. "We've got so many crabs now we can't sell them. " That's in part because "demand has been iffy" at times, said Jack Brooks, co-owner of the J.M. Clayton Co., a long-time seafood business in Cambridge that packs and ships 30,000 pounds of crabs and crabmeat daily from spring into fall.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2010
This campaign flier gets your attention. On one side, the mailing from Baltimore County executive candidate Kevin Kamenetz shows an offshore oil rig engulfed in flames. The text says the Gulf of Mexico disaster is going to cost BP billions. On the other side is an image of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge. If the disaster happened here, the flier claims, Joseph Bartenfelder would cap BP's liability at $10 million - "And we would be left to clean up the mess. " Kamenetz's shot at his fellow Democrat's environmental record as a member of the Maryland House of Delegates is powerful, but also misleading.
NEWS
By Matthew Olshan | July 19, 2010
Late last week my eyes were glued to my Internet browser, where a strange and sometimes baffling underwater ballet was unfolding. Perhaps you were watching the live video feeds from the BP oil well spill, too. I watched with a mixture of revulsion and pride. Revulsion at the sight of the filthy plume of oil that had been poisoning the Gulf of Mexico for nearly three months; and pride in the ingenuity of the engineers who designed the cap that finally shut it off, and in the team that was executing the mission with cool heads and steady hands.
NEWS
By Matthew Olshan | July 19, 2010
Late last week my eyes were glued to my Internet browser, where a strange and sometimes baffling underwater ballet was unfolding. Perhaps you were watching the live video feeds from the BP oil well spill, too. I watched with a mixture of revulsion and pride. Revulsion at the sight of the filthy plume of oil that had been poisoning the Gulf of Mexico for nearly three months; and pride in the ingenuity of the engineers who designed the cap that finally shut it off, and in the team that was executing the mission with cool heads and steady hands.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2010
Looking out from his waterfront home in Fairhope, Ala., Frederick "Rick" T. Kuykendall III can see miles of boom protecting a coastline endangered by millions of gallons of oil pouring out of a well in the Gulf of Mexico. In all his years of environmental law, Kuykendall couldn't have expected that what may be his biggest case would happen in the region where he grew up. Kuykendall, 55, is a lawyer affiliated with the Murphy Firm in Baltimore, a prominent firm headed by Billy Murphy that specializes in complex commercial litigation.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.