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Deepak Chopra

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By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
"There is a part of me that has a romantic notion to disappear," says Deepak Chopra. He could step hard on the gas in his BMW and just keep going, going. Yes, Chopra admits, sometimes even he longs to escape the responsibilities that come with being a best-selling author, New Age high priest and the human bridge spanning ancient Indian healing and high-tech Western medicine. "I consider myself somebody who offers the tools for inspiration," the 58-year-old lapsed endocrinologist adds.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Amazon.com; Publisher's Weekly | November 2, 2008
tuesday Divine Justice : by David Baldacci (Grand Central, $26.99). John Carr, alias "Oliver Stone," is the most wanted man in America. The assassinations he carried out prompt the highest levels of the U.S. government to unleash a huge manhunt. Salvation in Death : by J.D. Robb (Putnam, $25.95). Detective Eve Dallas pieces together the clues in the mysterious death of an East Harlem, N.Y., priest. Midnight : by Sister Souljah (Atria, $26.95). A young Sudanese immigrant struggles to hold onto his traditional values while growing up on New York's meanest streets.
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NEWS
By Mark Drajem and Mark Drajem,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 1998
NEW DELHI -- When asthmatics or insomniacs, those with clogged arteries or cancer visit the large Apollo Hospital, the treatments are no longer limited to intravenous drips or surgery. The patients might be told to sniff natural oils, meditate or stretch the body like a cobra.The Body-Mind Institute, backed by self-help author Dr. Deepak Chopra, is bringing traditional Indian medicine into this modern U.S.-style hospital on the outskirts of India's capital city.Upper-class Indians, it seems, are rediscovering their country's traditional medicine -- everything from herbal medicines to meditation to astrology.
NEWS
June 27, 2006
Chopra captured Muslims' frustration As an 18-year-old Muslim who has grown up as a peace-loving American, I would like to express my admiration for Deepak Chopra's words ("Try listening to Muslim world," Opinion Commentary, June 21). His column really nails the way Muslims who truly follow the principles of Islam feel. When I watch the news, I feel angry. Wouldn't others feel angry if Christianity and bombing, or fundamentalists and Jesus, were said to be in conjunction every time they watched the news?
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | August 9, 1995
Maryland Public Television launches its 12-day fall pledge drive tonight with a three-hour block devoted to multi-media holistic physician Dr. Deepak Chopra. And Laverne and Shirley are back -- again.* "The Omen" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- In an unsuccessful pilot, three unrelated people (Brett Cullen, Bill Sadler and Chelsea Field) who have lost loved ones to a mysterious force come together to protect others. NBC.* "The Laverne & Shirley Reunion" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
NEWS
August 13, 1995
"The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success," Deepak Chopra. It's very inspirational, very positive. He talks about potential, and all the potential we have and that we just have to tap it!"Joan Pratt,DemocratI'm in the middle of "Lord of the Rings." It's not the first time I've read it. It's a relaxing book to read. Besides that, I'm reading the city budget.Christopher McShane, RepublicanI just finished "True North," by Jill Ker Conway. I liked her first book better. Now I'm reading "W.E.B. Dubois," by David Levering Lewis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amazon.com; Publisher's Weekly | November 2, 2008
tuesday Divine Justice : by David Baldacci (Grand Central, $26.99). John Carr, alias "Oliver Stone," is the most wanted man in America. The assassinations he carried out prompt the highest levels of the U.S. government to unleash a huge manhunt. Salvation in Death : by J.D. Robb (Putnam, $25.95). Detective Eve Dallas pieces together the clues in the mysterious death of an East Harlem, N.Y., priest. Midnight : by Sister Souljah (Atria, $26.95). A young Sudanese immigrant struggles to hold onto his traditional values while growing up on New York's meanest streets.
FEATURES
By Diego Ribadeneira and Diego Ribadeneira,BOSTON GLOBE | October 8, 1995
For consistently outstanding writing and a thought-provoking mix of articles, few magazines do better than Harper's.This month, Barry Lopez offers a fascinating and revealing piece on cargo planes and the odd things they carry. Most of the stranger items involve food and reflect the world's diverse cravings -- ostrich and horse meat and bear testicles. Then there are durians -- "pulpy, melon-sized fruit whose scent reminds most Westerners of vomit."In the same Harper's and just in time for Halloween, don't miss Ted C. Fishman's frightening damned-if-you-do/damned-if-you-don't look at the stock market.
NEWS
June 27, 2006
Chopra captured Muslims' frustration As an 18-year-old Muslim who has grown up as a peace-loving American, I would like to express my admiration for Deepak Chopra's words ("Try listening to Muslim world," Opinion Commentary, June 21). His column really nails the way Muslims who truly follow the principles of Islam feel. When I watch the news, I feel angry. Wouldn't others feel angry if Christianity and bombing, or fundamentalists and Jesus, were said to be in conjunction every time they watched the news?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | September 19, 1999
Wendy Kaminer -- journalist and activist -- was a leader in skepticism about the "recovered memory" movement. Enraging many important fellow-feminists, she attacked a widening hysteria that suggested vast numbers of children, particularly girls, had been abused sexually in early life and had repressed their memories of that abuse.Advocates of this pernicious fad insisted that it was their duty to urge these ostensible "victims" to remember abuses -- whether they were real or imagined. Their efforts produced testimony (much of it later repudiated)
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
"There is a part of me that has a romantic notion to disappear," says Deepak Chopra. He could step hard on the gas in his BMW and just keep going, going. Yes, Chopra admits, sometimes even he longs to escape the responsibilities that come with being a best-selling author, New Age high priest and the human bridge spanning ancient Indian healing and high-tech Western medicine. "I consider myself somebody who offers the tools for inspiration," the 58-year-old lapsed endocrinologist adds.
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 2000
Ask someone what the Church of Religious Science is about and the person likely will respond, "It's scientology." Or the answer might be: "Christian science." But neither is correct. The Church of Religious Science teaches a spiritual philosophy created by metaphysical thinker Ernest Holmes (1887-1960) and encapsulated in the book "Science of Mind," published in 1926. It is a "new thought" - not "New Age" - church, based on the teachings of Jesus and the wisdom of other major world religions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | September 19, 1999
Wendy Kaminer -- journalist and activist -- was a leader in skepticism about the "recovered memory" movement. Enraging many important fellow-feminists, she attacked a widening hysteria that suggested vast numbers of children, particularly girls, had been abused sexually in early life and had repressed their memories of that abuse.Advocates of this pernicious fad insisted that it was their duty to urge these ostensible "victims" to remember abuses -- whether they were real or imagined. Their efforts produced testimony (much of it later repudiated)
NEWS
By Mark Drajem and Mark Drajem,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 1998
NEW DELHI -- When asthmatics or insomniacs, those with clogged arteries or cancer visit the large Apollo Hospital, the treatments are no longer limited to intravenous drips or surgery. The patients might be told to sniff natural oils, meditate or stretch the body like a cobra.The Body-Mind Institute, backed by self-help author Dr. Deepak Chopra, is bringing traditional Indian medicine into this modern U.S.-style hospital on the outskirts of India's capital city.Upper-class Indians, it seems, are rediscovering their country's traditional medicine -- everything from herbal medicines to meditation to astrology.
FEATURES
By Diego Ribadeneira and Diego Ribadeneira,BOSTON GLOBE | October 8, 1995
For consistently outstanding writing and a thought-provoking mix of articles, few magazines do better than Harper's.This month, Barry Lopez offers a fascinating and revealing piece on cargo planes and the odd things they carry. Most of the stranger items involve food and reflect the world's diverse cravings -- ostrich and horse meat and bear testicles. Then there are durians -- "pulpy, melon-sized fruit whose scent reminds most Westerners of vomit."In the same Harper's and just in time for Halloween, don't miss Ted C. Fishman's frightening damned-if-you-do/damned-if-you-don't look at the stock market.
NEWS
August 13, 1995
"The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success," Deepak Chopra. It's very inspirational, very positive. He talks about potential, and all the potential we have and that we just have to tap it!"Joan Pratt,DemocratI'm in the middle of "Lord of the Rings." It's not the first time I've read it. It's a relaxing book to read. Besides that, I'm reading the city budget.Christopher McShane, RepublicanI just finished "True North," by Jill Ker Conway. I liked her first book better. Now I'm reading "W.E.B. Dubois," by David Levering Lewis.
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 2000
Ask someone what the Church of Religious Science is about and the person likely will respond, "It's scientology." Or the answer might be: "Christian science." But neither is correct. The Church of Religious Science teaches a spiritual philosophy created by metaphysical thinker Ernest Holmes (1887-1960) and encapsulated in the book "Science of Mind," published in 1926. It is a "new thought" - not "New Age" - church, based on the teachings of Jesus and the wisdom of other major world religions.
NEWS
February 6, 2008
MAHARISHI MAHESH YOGI, 91 Introduced the Beatles to transcendental meditation The Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, a guru to the Beatles who introduced the West to transcendental meditation, died yesterday at his home in the Dutch town of Vlodrop, a spokesman said. "He died peacefully at about 7 p.m.," said Bob Roth, a spokesman for the Transcendental Meditation movement that the Maharishi founded. He said his death appeared to be due to "natural causes, his age." Once dismissed as hippie mysticism, the Hindu practice of mind control that the Maharishi taught, called transcendental meditation, gradually gained medical respectability.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | August 9, 1995
Maryland Public Television launches its 12-day fall pledge drive tonight with a three-hour block devoted to multi-media holistic physician Dr. Deepak Chopra. And Laverne and Shirley are back -- again.* "The Omen" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- In an unsuccessful pilot, three unrelated people (Brett Cullen, Bill Sadler and Chelsea Field) who have lost loved ones to a mysterious force come together to protect others. NBC.* "The Laverne & Shirley Reunion" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
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