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By KEVIN COWHERD | June 2, 2005
ADMIT IT - was that about the biggest let-down you've had in years? W. Mark Felt is Deep Throat? Are you kidding me? That old guy in the flannel shirt who was smiling and waving with his family on all the newscasts - that's the guy who helped topple a presidency? That's the shadowy figure Bob Woodward was meeting in parking garages for info on Watergate, one of the most notorious political scandals in U.S. history? Oh. Well, OK. If you say so. But I think we can safely sum up, in a single word, the reaction of millions of my fellow Americans when the stunning news about Deep Throat's identity was first revealed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 19, 2008
W. Mark Felt, 95 'Deep Throat' source W. Mark Felt, the FBI official who as the anonymous journalists' source "Deep Throat" helped bring down President Richard M. Nixon, died yesterday at his home in Santa Rosa, Calif. He was 95. Felt had congestive heart failure but the immediate cause of death was not known last night. "He was an important person for the history of our nation, but also such a gem and such a treasure to our family," said his grandson Nick Jones, who confirmed the death.
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NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2005
YinYin Yu, Melinda Kenny scrapped her lesson plans for yesterday's honors philosophy class at Catonsville High School. Instead, she seized this week's teachable moment - the revelation of the identity of Deep Throat, the famous confidential source to The Washington Post during the Watergate scandal - and shaped her 90-minute class around a discussion of his ethics. Three students came out strongly in defense of W. Mark Felt's decision to guide reporter Bob Woodward, and the public's right to know the behavior of its elected leaders.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN BOOK EDITOR | July 17, 2005
JOURNALISM THE SECRET MAN: THE STORY OF WATERGATE'S DEEP THROAT By Bob Woodward. Simon & Schuster, 249 pages. First off, The Secret Man, Bob Woodward's account of his dealing with Deep Throat, his legendary secret source, only adds incrementally to the vast body of knowledge already known about Watergate (thanks immeasurably to Woodward's own reporting in The Washington Post and his previous books). But as a portrait of the taut, complicated relationship between a reporter and confidential source who, overcoming his own conflicted motivations, puts everything at risk to disclose what he knows, it is a provocative, even stirring contribution.
NEWS
By William Neikirk and William Neikirk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - Attempting to solve one of America's greatest political mysteries, student investigators at the University of Illinois have concluded that former White House lawyer Fred F. Fielding is the "Deep Throat" who broke the Watergate scandal wide open. Some of the students and their teacher, Bill Gaines, a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner for the Chicago Tribune, named Fielding as their choice for Deep Throat in a news conference at the Watergate Hotel, site of the break-in at the Democratic National Committee nearly 31 years ago. Deep Throat was the nickname that Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward gave to his anonymous source, who provided damaging details of the break-in and Nixon administration efforts to cover it up, along with its campaign of "dirty tricks" against political opponents.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 26, 2000
WASHINGTON - It's too bad that both John Sears and Bob Woodward say emphatically that Sears is not the Watergate mystery man, as former Nixon White House counsel Leonard Garment says he is in his new book, "In Search of Deep Throat: The Greatest Political Mystery of Our Time." He'd have made a good one. John Patrick Sears, now 60, in real life would be perfectly type-cast for the role: a politically astute inside player who during the early Nixon years kept a very low profile but was up to his ears in the political machinations of the time.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 3, 2005
THE uncovering of the world's most famous anonymous source, Deep Throat, sends me into old files I haven't looked at in 30 years. There's Frank Pelz and there's Paul Chester, and there's Turk Scott, too. They were not Richard Nixon, and I would not pretend to be Bob Woodward or Carl Bernstein. But the files, on old copy paper now frayed around the edges, reminds me how far we have come in newspapers, and how much of it seems frightening. Deep Throat, aka the ex-FBI man W. Mark Felt, transports all of us of a certain age back to Watergate, when the Nixon White House tried to sneak a fast one past Justice while she had her blindfold on. It's probably too much to say that Felt saved the country while hiding in the shadows.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 1, 2005
WASHINGTON - The mystery surrounding one of America's most durable journalistic secrets was solved yesterday with the unmasking of an aging, retired FBI official as the anonymous Watergate-era source known as "Deep Throat." W. Mark Felt, 91, is quoted in a forthcoming magazine article as acknowledging that "I'm the guy they used to call Deep Throat." The article, in the July issue of Vanity Fair, describes Felt, who suffered a stroke in 2001, as being in failing health with a "memory for details [that]
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2005
Esquire had it wrong; Atlantic Monthly had it right. Leonard Garment's book missed the mark; Ronald Kessler's was on the money. William Gaines' college journalism class flunked the test; Chase Culeman-Beckman's high school paper, though he didn't get an "A" when he turned it in in the late 1990s, should have put him at the head of the class. A three-decade national guessing game is over: W. Mark Felt, former associate director of the FBI, has revealed to Vanity Fair magazine that he was "Deep Throat," the anonymous source who leaked information to The Washington Post that helped expose the Watergate scandal.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 3, 2005
WASHINGTON - How ironic it is that just when the use of anonymous news sources was the hot journalistic topic over Newsweek's story about alleged Quran desecration, the most famous such source in American history has now blown his own cover? The revelation by retired FBI official W. Mark Felt that he was the storied "Deep Throat" who helped Washington Post sleuths Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein trigger the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon is a timely reminder of the value of such sources in unearthing government misconduct.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 7, 2005
L. Patrick Gray III, acting director of the FBI during the Watergate crisis who surfaced publicly last month for the first time in three decades to decry the revelation that his top assistant was the Deep Throat character who leaked information about the scandal, died yesterday. Mr. Gray, 88, died shortly after midnight at his home in Atlantic Beach, Fla., of complications from pancreatic cancer. A former Navy submariner and lawyer who later met then-Rep. Richard M. Nixon and eventually found himself at the helm of the federal law enforcement agency, Mr. Gray was denounced by critics who believed he tried to deep-six the Watergate scandal by keeping the Nixon White House apprised of the FBI's investigation into the matter.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | June 7, 2005
WASHINGTON - Patrick J. Buchanan and the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson don't often agree on much politically, but each finds a lot to dislike about Deep Throat. So do I. Like many folks over the last three decades, I was hoping that the mysterious Deep Throat of Watergate-era fame would turn out to be a pristine-clean Dudley Do-Right, motivated by patriotism, constitutional concerns and maybe a guilty conscience as he fed Watergate revelations to The Washington Post's Bob Woodward. Instead, he is W. Mark Felt, a top FBI official at the time, whose constitutional concerns did not prevent him from being convicted in 1980 for authorizing government agents to break into homes secretly, without search warrants, in a search for anti-Vietnam War bombing suspects from the radical Weather Underground in 1972 and 1973.
TOPIC
By John Woestendiek and Paul West and John Woestendiek and Paul West,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2005
When "Deep Throat" first cloaked himself in secrecy, W. Mark Felt was the nation's No. 2 crime fighter, the presidency was headed into some of its darkest days ever and the news media were on the verge of what would be their brightest. Today, more than 30 years later, Felt is a 91-year-old stroke victim who uses a walker. The presidency has, despite some bumps, rebounded. And the news media are limping through a mire of scandal, public distrust and self-doubt. Felt's disclosure that he was the nation's most famous anonymous source comes at a time - ironically or not - when the press, and newspapers in particular, is re-examining not just that practice, but its very soul.
NEWS
June 3, 2005
Racial divide did influence jury's verdict The Sun's editorial "An imperfect system" (May 27) stated, "No one can say that a racially mixed jury in Anne Arundel County would have rendered a different verdict in the beating death of Noah Jamahl Jones." Really? I was surprised The Sun made that statement, as The Sun and The Washington Post have reported that both of the black alternates who served with the jury that acquitted Jacob Tyler Fortney indicated that they would have found Mr. Fortney guilty of some of the charges ("Teen acquitted in Jones' death," May 13)
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 3, 2005
WASHINGTON - How ironic it is that just when the use of anonymous news sources was the hot journalistic topic over Newsweek's story about alleged Quran desecration, the most famous such source in American history has now blown his own cover? The revelation by retired FBI official W. Mark Felt that he was the storied "Deep Throat" who helped Washington Post sleuths Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein trigger the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon is a timely reminder of the value of such sources in unearthing government misconduct.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 3, 2005
THE uncovering of the world's most famous anonymous source, Deep Throat, sends me into old files I haven't looked at in 30 years. There's Frank Pelz and there's Paul Chester, and there's Turk Scott, too. They were not Richard Nixon, and I would not pretend to be Bob Woodward or Carl Bernstein. But the files, on old copy paper now frayed around the edges, reminds me how far we have come in newspapers, and how much of it seems frightening. Deep Throat, aka the ex-FBI man W. Mark Felt, transports all of us of a certain age back to Watergate, when the Nixon White House tried to sneak a fast one past Justice while she had her blindfold on. It's probably too much to say that Felt saved the country while hiding in the shadows.
NEWS
December 19, 2008
W. Mark Felt, 95 'Deep Throat' source W. Mark Felt, the FBI official who as the anonymous journalists' source "Deep Throat" helped bring down President Richard M. Nixon, died yesterday at his home in Santa Rosa, Calif. He was 95. Felt had congestive heart failure but the immediate cause of death was not known last night. "He was an important person for the history of our nation, but also such a gem and such a treasure to our family," said his grandson Nick Jones, who confirmed the death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN BOOK EDITOR | July 17, 2005
JOURNALISM THE SECRET MAN: THE STORY OF WATERGATE'S DEEP THROAT By Bob Woodward. Simon & Schuster, 249 pages. First off, The Secret Man, Bob Woodward's account of his dealing with Deep Throat, his legendary secret source, only adds incrementally to the vast body of knowledge already known about Watergate (thanks immeasurably to Woodward's own reporting in The Washington Post and his previous books). But as a portrait of the taut, complicated relationship between a reporter and confidential source who, overcoming his own conflicted motivations, puts everything at risk to disclose what he knows, it is a provocative, even stirring contribution.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2005
YinYin Yu, Melinda Kenny scrapped her lesson plans for yesterday's honors philosophy class at Catonsville High School. Instead, she seized this week's teachable moment - the revelation of the identity of Deep Throat, the famous confidential source to The Washington Post during the Watergate scandal - and shaped her 90-minute class around a discussion of his ethics. Three students came out strongly in defense of W. Mark Felt's decision to guide reporter Bob Woodward, and the public's right to know the behavior of its elected leaders.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | June 2, 2005
ADMIT IT - was that about the biggest let-down you've had in years? W. Mark Felt is Deep Throat? Are you kidding me? That old guy in the flannel shirt who was smiling and waving with his family on all the newscasts - that's the guy who helped topple a presidency? That's the shadowy figure Bob Woodward was meeting in parking garages for info on Watergate, one of the most notorious political scandals in U.S. history? Oh. Well, OK. If you say so. But I think we can safely sum up, in a single word, the reaction of millions of my fellow Americans when the stunning news about Deep Throat's identity was first revealed.
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