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By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Ask him for the highlight of his Hall of Fame career and Frank Robinson jumps on it like a high fastball. "The '66 season," he told The Baltimore Sun last month. "I couldn't have scripted the first year [with the Orioles] any better. That's winning the pennant, that's sweeping the Dodgers [in the World Series], that's winning the Triple Crown and the Most Valuable Player. That's Hollywood stuff. " None of that happens without Robinson, the headstrong 30-year-old outfielder obtained from the Cincinnati Reds.
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By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Ask him for the highlight of his Hall of Fame career and Frank Robinson jumps on it like a high fastball. "The '66 season," he told The Baltimore Sun last month. "I couldn't have scripted the first year [with the Orioles] any better. That's winning the pennant, that's sweeping the Dodgers [in the World Series], that's winning the Triple Crown and the Most Valuable Player. That's Hollywood stuff. " None of that happens without Robinson, the headstrong 30-year-old outfielder obtained from the Cincinnati Reds.
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By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2005
Maybe it's because it could help unravel the mysteries of the universe. Maybe it reminds us of Star Wars. Maybe it's the reassurance it provides - knowing, in these fearful times, that our government, even if it can't find Osama bin Laden, can pinpoint and strike an object traveling at 23,000 mph 83 million miles away. For whatever reason, NASA's dead-on hit on the comet Tempel 1, and the images of that collision, are attracting viewers across the country - maybe not as many as Revenge of the Sith, but some of the most respectable numbers ever for a real-life outer space event.
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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
A Maryland-led mission to capture close-up photos of Comet Hartley 2 climaxed Thursday with razor-sharp images of a whirling, bowling-pin-shaped object spewing jets of carbon dioxide into space. University of Maryland astronomer Jessica Sunshine, assistant principal investigator for NASA's $46 million EPOXI mission, said the 1.2-mile-long comet nucleus seems to be throwing off tons of gas and dust from its rough-looking ends, while accumulating smooth drifts of fine-grained material in lower terrain at the center.
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By ANN HORNADAY and SUN FILM CRITIC | January 1, 1999
Kids still rule.That's the lesson that most clearly emerged from Hollywood in 1998, and there's no doubt movie executives took it to heart. The throbbingly illogical "Armageddon" and similarly themed "Deep Impact," followed by the surprise comedy hits "There's Something About Mary" and "The Waterboy," double-teamed to win the day. (Can the action-comedy "Kick My Asteroid" -- with Cameron Diaz as a rocket scientist who gets into lewdly comic trouble with...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | July 7, 2007
Available: Deep Impact and Stardust. Older model spacecraft, already in orbit. Only a few billion miles on them. Big science! Huge markdown! Well, NASA liked the pitch. The space agency has decided to reactivate the two semi-retired comet-hunters and reassign them to two more comet flybys. Deep Impact will also turn its instruments on some gigantic planets circling nearby stars, and back toward Earth to see what a living planet looks like from a distance. The two mission extensions announced this week will cost no more than $55 million, according to NASA officials.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Comet Tempel 1, little more than a fuzzy spot of light in astronomers' telescopes, has turned out to be a complex little world whose surface has the consistency of dry powder snow. Scientists poring over data sent back by NASA's Deep Impact last July told colleagues yesterday that the comet is also unexpectedly active, belching clouds of water vapor and carbon dioxide into space as often as once a week. A science team, led by University of Maryland professor Michael A'Hearn, has just begun to plumb the voluminous data sent back by the spacecraft and the 820-pound "impactor" it dropped into the path of the speeding comet on Independence Day. "There's more than enough to keep us busy until well after I retire," said A'hearn, 64, at the 207th meeting of the American Astronomic Society.
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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2001
A University of Maryland, College Park scientist has won NASA's approval to lead a $279 million space mission that any 10-year-old boy would understand and applaud. Astronomer Michael A'Hearn will lead a team that's planning to find out what's inside comet Tempel 1 by smashing into it with a 771-pound copper "hammer" -- the biggest they could loft into space. "It's a guy thing," said College Park astronomer Lucy McFadden, co-investigator on the project being led by A'Hearn. "It's going to be a blast, that's for sure."
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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2005
Not everyone is as excited as cometary scientists are about NASA's plans to blast a hole in a comet this weekend. Uncertainties about what will happen when Deep Impact's impactor plows into the comet's nucleus have stirred anxiety and anger in some circles about the space agency's eagerness to fool with Mother Nature. Writing in January in an online forum called "John P. Hoke's Asylum," a contributor identifying himself as Rob Razor said, "I just don't think it's a good idea to be placing bombs on comets."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | November 26, 2004
You can learn something about a rock by looking at it. But what most geologists really want is to smack it with a hammer. And that's just what planetary scientists will do July 4 when NASA's Deep Impact mission reaches the comet Tempel 1 after a trip of six months and 80 million miles. If all goes well, an 820-pound copper "hammer" the size of a bathtub will separate from its mother ship and, 24 hours later, smash into the comet's icy nucleus at about 23,000 mph. "It's bound to be a blast," said University of Maryland astronomer Lucy McFadden, a member of the Maryland-led Deep Impact team.
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By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
For a week now, Michael Phelps has been one of the most polarizing figures in sports. And though this isn't the first time Phelps' judgment has been questioned, fallout from the incident has introduced something new to his career: indecision. Maybe, Phelps told The Baltimore Sun last week, in his first interview after the story broke, he wouldn't swim in the 2012 Olympics after all. Perhaps it was a rare moment of unscripted honesty from a celebrity whose life has been scripted for so long.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | December 29, 2008
The Ravens clinched the fifth playoff berth in team history, but they did it in a way unknown in this era of Baltimore football. Realizing they had to win to get in - the New England Patriots had won about 20 minutes before kickoff - the Ravens completed a surprising regular season by riding a big-play rookie quarterback to a 27-7-victory yesterday over the Jacksonville Jaguars before an elated 71,366 at M&T Bank Stadium. Joe Flacco threw for a season-high 297 yards as the Ravens (11-5)
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By Jamison Hensley | jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | December 29, 2008
The Ravens clinched the fifth playoff berth in team history, but they did it in a way unknown in this era of Baltimore football. Realizing they had to win to get in - the New England Patriots had won about 20 minutes before kickoff - the Ravens completed a surprising regular season by riding a big-play rookie quarterback to a 27-7-victory yesterday over the Jacksonville Jaguars before an elated 71,366 at M&T Bank Stadium. Joe Flacco threw for a season-high 297 yards as the Ravens (11-5)
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN REPORTER | April 24, 2008
SEATTLE -- Nick Markakis almost didn't get the opportunity to hit in the eighth inning last night. The normally mild-mannered outfielder was so furious about being called out on strikes in the fourth inning that he lingered at home plate, letting plate umpire Brian Runge know exactly what he thought of the call. Runge warned Markakis to be quiet or he would be ejected. Markakis, who had struck out seven times in his past eight at-bats to that point, heeded Runge's advice, and the Orioles and Daniel Cabrera were glad that he did. Markakis tied the game with an RBI groundout in the sixth inning and then won it the eight with a solo homer on left-hander Ryan Rowland-Smith's first pitch.
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By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | February 16, 2008
Michael A'Hearn is about to find out if there are second acts in American astronomy. The University of Maryland scientist made international news in 2005 when he ran the Deep Impact mission, which slammed an 820-pound projectile into the path of a comet speeding through space at 23,000 mph. The smash-up became one of the most widely watched unmanned projects in NASA history. A'Hearn is now overseeing a $41 million NASA mission that recycles the Deep Impact spacecraft - which fired the projectile into the comet - to search for Earth-like planets in our interstellar neighborhood.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | December 15, 2007
A University of Maryland team of astronomers will lead a $40 million NASA effort to use a recycled spacecraft to study a set of planets outside our solar system and then fly the craft within 620 miles of a distant comet for a close look. The Deep Impact spacecraft will survey the heavens around five stars that have Jupiter-size planets, looking for planets capable of supporting life. That work will begin in January and last about six months. The craft will then head toward a meeting with comet Hartley 2 in 2010; it will use its two telescopes and infrared spectrometer to study the half-mile-wide comet.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2005
Smashed by a NASA probe this summer, the Tempel 1 comet is yielding clues to the types of materials that formed the early solar system, scientists said yesterday. Images of dust ejected from the comet show the same type of minerals seen in just-forming solar systems, such as sootlike hydrocarbons, the type of calcium carbonates found in limestone and crystalline silicates. There is also evidence of aluminum sulfides and iron sulfides, major constituents of the Earth's crust, said Carey Lisse, a member of the Deep Impact team and a senior scientist at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | February 16, 2008
Michael A'Hearn is about to find out if there are second acts in American astronomy. The University of Maryland scientist made international news in 2005 when he ran the Deep Impact mission, which slammed an 820-pound projectile into the path of a comet speeding through space at 23,000 mph. The smash-up became one of the most widely watched unmanned projects in NASA history. A'Hearn is now overseeing a $41 million NASA mission that recycles the Deep Impact spacecraft - which fired the projectile into the comet - to search for Earth-like planets in our interstellar neighborhood.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Reporter | October 15, 2007
At times yesterday, the Ravens looked like the offensive team that was advertised all summer - the one that would take its shots downfield and take advantage of having three more-than-capable wide receivers as well as tight end Todd Heap. Of course, all that preseason bravado came with a caveat: Could they be that explosive an offense with Steve McNair at quarterback? Even with Heap leaving early after re-injuring his hamstring, the Ravens finally used their receivers as a weapon in a 22-3 victory over the sad-sack St. Louis Rams at M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | July 7, 2007
Available: Deep Impact and Stardust. Older model spacecraft, already in orbit. Only a few billion miles on them. Big science! Huge markdown! Well, NASA liked the pitch. The space agency has decided to reactivate the two semi-retired comet-hunters and reassign them to two more comet flybys. Deep Impact will also turn its instruments on some gigantic planets circling nearby stars, and back toward Earth to see what a living planet looks like from a distance. The two mission extensions announced this week will cost no more than $55 million, according to NASA officials.
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