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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | April 12, 1994
In time for the spring boating season, the state of Maryland and Pennsylvania Electric Co. have signed a new contract for the management of Deep Creek Lake, Garrett County's primary tourist attraction.Under the five-year lease, Penelec will pay the state Department of Natural Resources $340,000 a year to manage the 3,900-acre lake.The three-member state Board of Public Works had delayed signing a new lease -- tentatively approved in December -- after Deep Creek Lake property owners raised concerns about recreational access to the man-made lake and a proposed increase in fees for floating docks and boats.
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FEATURES
By Donna Owens and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
More than 150 years ago, famed philosopher Henry David Thoreau published his iconic book “Walden,” which chronicled his two years living as one with nature in a cabin set on Walden Pond in Massachusetts. Today, some travelers who seek a Walden-esque experience still want 21st-century amenities and perks. At Blue Moon Rising, a new eco-friendly vacation village nestled in the mountains of Western Maryland, they'll find the best of both worlds. Following a soft opening in fall 2013, the retreat officially opened to guests June 27. Tucked away on 15 wooded acres replete with towering oak, hickory and hemlock trees, various flora, fauna and a quiet stream, the property boasts 14 environmentally conscious, compact and energy-efficient cabins (ranging from 300 to 450 square feet)
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SPORTS
By Bill Burton | June 28, 1991
DEEP CREEK LAKE -- It's dark out here on Maryland's largest lake. The moon is obscured by patches of low drifting fog.Fishing lights mounted on the gunwale of guide Bill Teeter's bassboat reveal a small rocky island nearby; elsewhere there are lights from shoreside summer homes, and the green, white and red blubs of other boats cutting the waves in all directions.On summer nights, Deep Creek Lake is a busy place. There are joyriders and there are fishermen -- and some of the latter are scooting by in bag bassboats after a cast or two here 'n there.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
Hundreds of hearty souls waded into icy Deep Creek Lake in Western Maryland on Saturday for the annual Deep Creek Dunk to benefit Special Olympics Maryland. The Maryland Natural Resources Police had to cut away a thick layer of ice from the lake to make room for the 850 dunkers, who waded into the water from a spot near the Honi Honi bar. "It looks like Alaska with the backdrop of the chunks of ice," said Jason Schriml, vice president of communications for Special Olympics Maryland.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | August 20, 1995
McHENRY -- Tim Selby and his family head from Westminster to Western Maryland just about any weekend they can to spend time at a family cabin overlooking scenic Deep Creek Lake. And to glide around the lake on their Honda Seadoos, or "personal watercraft," as they're called these days.But as Mr. Selby and countless others here will tell you, their enjoyment of Maryland's largest lake is hindered by a 6-year-old regulation that bans personal watercraft on the Garrett County lake from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on weekends and holidays from Memorial Day to Labor Day.It's a regulation that watercraft fans are pushing the state Department of Natural Resources to rescind, while their opponents charge that these machines -- sometimes likened to motorcycles on water -- are noisy, nuisances and safety hazards.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | June 1, 1995
McHENRY -- About this time of year, vacationers begin flocking to Deep Creek Lake to escape the noise and neon of the cities.They come to Garrett County for the great outdoors. They don't head into the mountains expecting to see golden arches along U.S. 219 as it winds along the shores of Deep Creek Lake. Nor do they expect to find the standard neon signs of tourist shops.At least, that's what many business owners here maintain. Their trade is built around serving tourists who want to relax.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | March 30, 1994
McHENRY -- Come this time each spring, Bill Sisler and other boaters in this tourist-dependent Garrett County community are getting ready to put their floating docks and rental boats into the still-cold waters of Deep Creek Lake.But a running dispute between a Pennsylvania electric company, the state and property owners over proposed usage fees and future recreational access to Deep Creek Lake has resulted in the Maryland Board of Public Works not signing a recent agreement, possibly affecting the summer season.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | December 13, 1990
It is Annapolis old and new. Watermen and Washingtonians. Crab cakes and blackened catfish. Several beers -- but more wines by the glass.So what if Annapolis is several miles away? So what if this ambience may not even exist within the capital city? This is the way it ought to be. The old and the new side by side. A working man's bar replaced by one with fine wood paneled walls, ceiling fans, big windows for "waterfront dining." But a bar where the old customers still come.This is Deep Creek, a restaurant on the Magothy River in Arnold, one of those bedroom communities off Governor Ritchie Highway whose residents each morning relocate to Baltimore, Annapolis or Washington.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | June 21, 1991
DEEP CREEK LAKE -- Bill Teeter crouched like a pitcher looking for a sign from the catcher. His eyes riveted straight ahead, he studied his target.There was no sense in wasting a throw, but he wasn't tossing a white ball; instead, it was a big white buzzbait. Teeter is not a baseball player, but his diamond is 2,800-acre Deep Creek Lake nestled in the slopes south of Roman Nose Mountain.Teeter let fly with the long-handled casting rod and the buzze landed several inches inside a patch of grass not as deep as a teacup.
NEWS
By Cindy Stacy and Cindy Stacy,SPECIAL TO THE SUN Sun staff writer Peter Jensen contributed to this article | April 7, 1998
OAKLAND -- An independent power producer has teamed with waterfront property owners and Garrett County in a private-public partnership, hoping to purchase Deep Creek Lake and the hydroelectric plant that created it from GPU Energy.Paul C. Rizzo & Associates of Monroeville, Pa., a company specializing in hydroelectric plants, told a county-appointed lake advisory committee late last week it was interested in acquiring the power plant, which GPU has packaged for sale with the lake."We believe we can be effective partners for the residents," said company owner Paul Rizzo, who first approached the 1,200-member Deep Creek Lake Property Owners Association last fall when it was rumored that GPU might sell Maryland's freshwater lake -- which is also the economic engine of the tourism-dependent county.
TRAVEL
By Megan Brockett, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Tourism gains boosted Garrett County and the Deep Creek Lake area during the last fiscal year, the result of record accommodations sales for the county and a sharp increase in tourism sales tax revenue, according to the Garrett County Chamber of Commerce. Garrett County, roughly three hours from Baltimore by car, attracts visitors year-round with the state's largest freshwater lake, Deep Creek Lake, and its only ski resort. Tourism sales tax revenues for the county climbed more than 6 percent during the fiscal year that spanned July 2012 to June 2013, while tourism sales tax revenues for the state as a whole grew by less than 1 percent.  Nicole Christian, president and CEO of the Garrett County Chamber of Commerce, attributes much of the county's tourism growth to aggressive marketing strategies that span print, television, radio and online mediums, among others.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
Swimming and fishing have been discouraged at Deep Creek Lake since Friday after sewage overflowed into the popular summer vacation destination.. Garrett County officials, through the county website, said Sunday that water quality samples taken earlier in the day led them to continue the restrictions on swimming and fishing, and promised more information would be released Monday. On Friday, 36,000 gallons of sanitary sewage overflowed from the McHenry Sewage Holding Tank into the northwestern end of Marsh Run Cove, in a stream that feeds into the state-owned lake.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2013
Once thought to be a somewhat out-of-the-way spot for winter ski trips and summer getaways from the scorching heat, Deep Creek Lake and the adjacent Wisp Resort could become "the No. 1 - bar none - adventure sports destination spot in the world" if Todd Copley has anything to do with it. Toward that goal, Copley's Deep Creek 2014 LLC will be helping run next weekend's USA Canoe Kayak Slalom Team Trials there, as well as the sport's world championships in...
TRAVEL
By Theresa Sintetos, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Deep Creek Lake Deep Creek Dunk Missed the Polar Bear Plunge in January? Here is your second chance to freeze for the Special Olympics. The 15th Annual Maryland State Police Deep Creek Dunk will be held Feb. 23. After dunking into the frigid water, there will be plenty of food and a wine tasting to warm you up. Registration for the Deep Creek Dunk is noon Febg. 23, with the dunk scheduled at 2 p.m. There is a $50 minimum donation to register. You may also register online at dunkmd.com.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Hanging on the wall of Mike and Jean Tumbarello's new retreat at Deep Creek Lake is an old framed greeting card with a primitive drawing of a brown log cabin nestled among trees aglow with autumn colors. The scene is rendered in crayon with a sentiment that reads, in part: "Jean, here's our cottage in the country. I wish I were in it with you right now. …" "The card was sent before we married — probably 1974, when we were dating in college, when you actually had to use snail mail," Jean Tumbarello recalled.
ENTERTAINMENT
The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Hot enough for you? Though it's cooled off some, it's safe to assume there will be nasty days ahead. And even if though temperatures may be about the same in the city and the 'burbs, it always feels hotter in the city. The only real way to cool off is to flee. But where? These five spots are all less than a tank of gas from the city, and offer a respite from the sweltering Baltimore summer. Tubing Gunpowder Falls State Park, a 45-minute drive from Baltimore, has hiking and biking trails and various campgrounds.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1998
The power company that owns Deep Creek Lake said yesterday it will give the state an exclusive shot at buying the Western Maryland tourist magnet -- if the Glendening administration and the utility can agree on a price.Gov. Parris N. Glendening called the deal a "momentous first step" toward protecting the interests of property owners and other users of the man-made lake, which attracts an estimated half-million visitors a year.The agreement was received enthusiastically by Western Maryland business leaders, who consider the lake the region's economic linchpin.
FEATURES
By Joe Surkiewicz and Joe Surkiewicz,Contributing Writer | May 23, 1993
f you're looking forward to summer, but not the season's 90-degree muggy days, the mountains of Western Maryland are just a cool breeze away.A half-hour west of Cumberland on Interstate 68, as you crest Big Savage Mountain, the temperature usually drops 10 to 15 degrees, summer mugginess gives way to crisp, cool air, and stretching out before you are beautiful vistas of rolling hills and wide alpine valleys.Welcome to Garrett County, a vacation mecca for folks who hate heat and humidity and love mountain views and unspoiled forests.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2011
The owners of a ski resort near Deep Creek Lake have filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy-law protection while they try to resolve financial difficulties related to another business. DC Development LLC, which owns Wisp Resort in Garrett County, announced the filing Sunday. The company has been unable to renegotiate the repayment of a $28.5 million loan with BB&T Corp. The loan was tied to the construction of an 18-hole golf course and community called Lodestone Golf Club. The golf club property, which is near the ski resort, has experienced lackluster sales of home sites.
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