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By GREGORY KANE | May 18, 1997
World chess champion Garry Kasparov had his butt handed to him early last week when a computer known as Deep Blue dispatched him within 19 moves."Nineteen moves!" I snorted on reading the news. "Heck, I could have lasted longer than 19 moves. In fact, I think I could have lasted longer than 19 moves without cheating."Chess experts, news reports said, were "stunned" by Deep Blue's easy victory. I don't know why. If they're indeed experts, they should know that all chess players have their bad days.
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By Donna Owens and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
More than 150 years ago, famed philosopher Henry David Thoreau published his iconic book “Walden,” which chronicled his two years living as one with nature in a cabin set on Walden Pond in Massachusetts. Today, some travelers who seek a Walden-esque experience still want 21st-century amenities and perks. At Blue Moon Rising, a new eco-friendly vacation village nestled in the mountains of Western Maryland, they'll find the best of both worlds. Following a soft opening in fall 2013, the retreat officially opened to guests June 27. Tucked away on 15 wooded acres replete with towering oak, hickory and hemlock trees, various flora, fauna and a quiet stream, the property boasts 14 environmentally conscious, compact and energy-efficient cabins (ranging from 300 to 450 square feet)
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NEWS
May 7, 1997
PETER COOPER built the locomotive Tom Thumb and raced it against a horse on the B&O tracks to Baltimore from Ellicott's Mills in 1830. The horse won when the locomotive's blower belt broke.John Henry was a steel-driving man, smashing rock for a rail tunnel, when the steam drill came to put men out of work. He challenged it, won, and died with his hammer in his hand.Whether these legends are true is less important than their tribute to human and equine fortitude, traits of character no machine can match.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
He knocked on doors in Ohio for President Barack Obama's campaign last year and is active in Maryland's Democratic Party, but Dave Kunes nevertheless opposes the president on what has become the central issue of his second term: whether to launch a military strike in Syria. Kunes, a 24-year-old Silver Spring resident, joined several dozen protesters who rallied in Rockville and Ellicott City on Wednesday to deliver the message that even in Democratic Maryland - where six in 10 voted to re-elect Obama last year - there are deep misgivings about U.S. involvement in another Middle East war. "We've always had President Obama's back.
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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- In a near-empty darkened room here, the world changed this weekend, maybe more than a little.The evolution that Garry Kasparov feared, and had set himself against, was realized: history's greatest chess player was defeated in the first of a six-game match by an artificial intelligence, the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue.He did come back in yesterday's second game and force Deep Blue to resign on the 73rd move, after a grueling 5-hour-and-40-minute battle in which Mr. Kasparov had the advantage of playing the white pieces and held it throughout.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 29, 2005
Deep Blue is pure bliss. This documentary about ocean life in all its forms achieves its own tidal pull with visual marvels that conjure a Darwinian delirium. At key moments, birds and fish and sea mammals of every size flood the screen simultaneously. Their grace and speed belie the survival-urge that drives them on. But the cameras of Andy Byatt and Alastair Fothergill (who worked on the BBC/Discovery Channel documentary TV series The Blue Planet) reveal the mysteries of their movements with hypnotic lucidity.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 9, 1997
NEW YORK -- On the 35th floor of a Manhattan skyscraper, inside a TV studio filled with the accouterments of a cozy study, the chess-playing machine sits to the camera's left and peers at the board, cooly preparing unrelenting defenses and ruthless attacks.The machine is Garry Kasparov. His opponent -- a temperamental, unpredictable computer named Deep Blue -- isn't even in the same room. Deep Blue is phoning it in, transmitting by wire from twin, black 6-foot towers that rest in an adjoining room to a computer screen next to the chess board.
NEWS
By Jocelyn A. Garlington | February 28, 1992
There are lessonsI have chosen to ignoreIn the breaking of dayFire orange light slashingExhausted blue-grayCool, deep blueIn a blaze of quiet ceremonyFilling, emptying, facingThere are lessonsLess obvious for knowingIn ominous glad tidingsIn soft-sigh whisperingsOf tornadoes and hurricanes hidingCalm quietly coming to a violent endMy ignorance is still insistingOn knowledge of your skinOn kisses fated to endPleasure lessonsA momentary "us"A little learningDangerous,...
FEATURES
May 11, 1999
Be a 4Kids DetectiveWhen you know the answers to these questions, go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/When is Ernie's birthday on Sesame Street?How do the Dutch say the word "frog"? (Go to http://www.teleport.com/~dstroy/ to find out.)Which chess champion did Deep Blue defeat in 1997?HIP TO BE SQUAREThe battlefield of chess is full of pitfalls and danger. That's why understanding this fascinating game from the inside-out is crucial. Make your next move to Chess Dominion at http://library.
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By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 29, 1997
SPEAKING FOR humanity, I am disturbed about Deep Blue.As you know if you read the newspapers, "Deep Blue" is a 1972 movie about a woman with an amazing ability to...Whoops! My mistake! I meant to say that Deep Blue is an IBM computer that recently defeated the world heavyweight chess champion, Garry "Lobes of Steel" Kasparov, causing serious chess fans everywhere to pick angrily at the tape holding their eyeglasses together.It wasn't just that Kasparov lost; it was the pathetic way he lost.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | March 21, 2008
Jane Farrington's first impression of what would be her new home in Baltimore's Mount Vernon neighborhood was one of awe the moment she and her husband stepped beyond the tiny vestibule entrance. "We walked in the front door," Farrington remembered, "I took one look at the spiral staircase and thought, "Oh God, I hope the basement is dry!" The basement - partially above ground in the circa 1882 townhouse - was completely dry. The four-story brick home, in fact, had been beautifully maintained by its former owner, clinching the deal for Farrington and her husband, Gregg Davis.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | July 20, 2007
You wouldn't think checkers could get so complicated. After working for six years with a network of up to 200 computers, Jonathan Schaeffer says he has developed a program that can never lose at checkers. At best, a human (or computer) opponent can achieve a draw. The program was designed with help from some of the world's top checkers players, but the computers did what no player could ever do: analyze 64 million positions on the board each second. "We've taken things to beyond what humans can do," said Schaeffer, chairman of the computer science department at the University of Alberta in Canada.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 30, 2005
When the movie gods conspired with Edison and others to create the cinema, they gave us two great gifts: Life recorded so keenly that common joys and tragedies - and uncommon ideas or emotions - became miraculously vivid and lasting. Illusions conjured so divinely that they took audiences out of this world and into arenas of pure magic or wild conjecture. For movies that opened in Baltimore this year, documentary-makers and fact-based filmmakers amazed us with a stream of nature sagas that were hair-raising (Grizzly Man)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 29, 2005
Over the phone from London, co-director Alastair Fothergill takes pains to differentiate seeing wildlife footage on a TV series like Blue Planet and witnessing it in a theater with a big screen and a stereo sound system. "A TV episode is actually a more high-pressure environment," Fothergill explains. "For example, in its pace and its point of attack, the jellyfish sequence that comes in the middle of Deep Blue is relatively gentle, light and shaded. TV watchers wouldn't have sat still for it. But in the context of the movie, people enjoy the change in mood and rhythm of this slower portion, and the ability to savor the intricacy of the structures."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 29, 2005
Deep Blue is pure bliss. This documentary about ocean life in all its forms achieves its own tidal pull with visual marvels that conjure a Darwinian delirium. At key moments, birds and fish and sea mammals of every size flood the screen simultaneously. Their grace and speed belie the survival-urge that drives them on. But the cameras of Andy Byatt and Alastair Fothergill (who worked on the BBC/Discovery Channel documentary TV series The Blue Planet) reveal the mysteries of their movements with hypnotic lucidity.
NEWS
November 4, 2004
GOV. ROBERT L. Ehrlich Jr. says we're in the middle of a sea change in Maryland politics, but he shouldn't pull out his surfboard quite yet. How did the retooled Maryland Republican Party perform Tuesday? Weakly. John Kerry won 1.2 million votes in Maryland, his 13-point victory margin making this one of his strongest states. Thanks to the high turnout, the Democratic nominee earned 55,000 more Maryland votes than Al Gore did four years ago. State Sen. E. J. Pipkin, the GOP's deep-pocketed challenger to Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, fared even worse.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 2003
NEW YORK - Ask most chess grandmasters if chess is art, and they will say unequivocally, "Yes." Ask them if chess is also a sport, and the answer will again be yes. But suggest that chess might be just a very complex math problem, and there is immediate resistance. The question is more than academic. Beginning tomorrow, Garry Kasparov, the world's top-ranked player and the former world champion, will play a $1 million, six-game match here against a chess program called Deep Junior. It will be the fourth time that Kasparov has matched wits against a computer and the first time since he lost a similar match in 1997 to Deep Blue, a chess-playing computer developed by IBM. Recently, Vladimir Kramnik, Kasparov's former protege and the current world champion, tied an eight-game match against another chess-playing program called Deep Fritz.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | July 20, 2007
You wouldn't think checkers could get so complicated. After working for six years with a network of up to 200 computers, Jonathan Schaeffer says he has developed a program that can never lose at checkers. At best, a human (or computer) opponent can achieve a draw. The program was designed with help from some of the world's top checkers players, but the computers did what no player could ever do: analyze 64 million positions on the board each second. "We've taken things to beyond what humans can do," said Schaeffer, chairman of the computer science department at the University of Alberta in Canada.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 18, 2004
Not long after we lost one New Wave seafood restaurant, another has surfaced. It remains to be seen whether Baltimore will embrace Blue Sea Grill when it didn't support the hip Canton restaurant Atlantic. We seem to like our seafood restaurants traditionally decorated and Eastern Shore-oriented. But the new place does have one important thing going for it. Blue Sea Grill is owned by savvy restaurateur Steve de Castro's Big Steaks Management Inc. It recently opened in the spot next to Power Plant Live where Cafe Asia, and then Red Coral, quickly came and went.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 2003
NEW YORK - Ask most chess grandmasters if chess is art, and they will say unequivocally, "Yes." Ask them if chess is also a sport, and the answer will again be yes. But suggest that chess might be just a very complex math problem, and there is immediate resistance. The question is more than academic. Beginning tomorrow, Garry Kasparov, the world's top-ranked player and the former world champion, will play a $1 million, six-game match here against a chess program called Deep Junior. It will be the fourth time that Kasparov has matched wits against a computer and the first time since he lost a similar match in 1997 to Deep Blue, a chess-playing computer developed by IBM. Recently, Vladimir Kramnik, Kasparov's former protege and the current world champion, tied an eight-game match against another chess-playing program called Deep Fritz.
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