Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDecriminalization
IN THE NEWS

Decriminalization

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 16, 2014
We, members of the Marijuana Policy Coalition of Maryland, write in response to the editorial, "Spin control," that appeared on May 8. Our coalition is non-partisan and does not endorse candidates. We take no position on the Maryland gubernatorial race. The purpose of this letter is to set the record straight. Our coalition promotes honest, fact-based dialogue regarding marijuana use and the impact of its criminalization and advocates for the safe, effective, efficient regulation and taxation of the sale of marijuana in Maryland for adults.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 3, 2014
Maryland's legislature decided to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana for a few reasons. Lawmakers concluded that police and prosecutors should not be focusing their attention on what is increasingly viewed by the public as a relatively harmless vice; they expressed concern that criminal convictions related to marijuana possession were harming the employment and educational prospects of thousands of Marylanders; and they were alarmed...
Advertisement
NEWS
March 12, 1992
DR. NEIL SOLOMON'S argument against the decriminalization of drugs (Other Voices, Feb. 18) was way off the mark.Dr. Solomon, who heads Governor Schaefer's drug and alcohol commission, acknowledges that "old approaches" aren't working, and he calls for "new approaches." He then goes on to denigrate any form of decriminalization -- completely ignoring the much greater social cost of such legal drugs as tobacco and alcohol. Then Dr. Solomon completely contradicts his own acknowledgment that "old approaches" don't work by calling for more of the same old impotent enforcement and punishment.
NEWS
July 8, 2014
Your recent editorial, "The Harris boycott" (July 7) put far too much emphasis on the politics and not enough on what really matters. The Washington, D.C., City Council has just passed the most lenient marijuana decriminalization law in the nation, with a $25 fine that is not only less than the average traffic ticket but involves no point system. Do we really want the capital of our nation and mecca for family tourism to go down this path? The data show that states with lenient decriminalization laws have higher rates of youth use, as reported to the Centers for Disease Control, than those that have stricter decriminalization with higher civil penalties for the first offense, increasing penalties for repeat offenders, and/or requirements for drug education.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
Marijuana decriminalization keeps in place the tax-free, gangster-subsidizing, anarchistic black market for pot ("O'Malley signs 'Jake's Law,' marijuana decriminalization," April 14). Only complete legalization deprives the gangsters of the $193.1 million a year that retail pot sales are worth in Maryland. That's based on Colorado's $14 million first-month retail sales of pot. The actual gateway to pot for kids is the existing prohibition. Politicians who support the continued prohibition of pot, including decriminalization, are only supporting the gangsters and abusers having unfettered, tax-free access to kids on the street.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The General Assembly moved Saturday to dramatically change Maryland's drug laws as the House of Delegates joined the Senate in voting to make possession of small amounts of marijuana a civil offense punishable only by a fine. The House voted 78-55 to approve a measure substantially similar to the decriminalization bill overwhelmingly passed by the Senate last month. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said his chamber would agree to the House's relatively minor changes and send the bill to Gov. Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | February 10, 2014
Introducing a note of civility into an increasingly hard-hitting race for governor, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown wrote to one of his Democratic rivals expressing approval of her legislation to decriminalize possession of marijuana. In a two-page letter that his office released to the media, Brown told Del. Heather R. Mizeur of Montgomery County that he recently introduced decriminalization bill is a "welcome part of the debate" and said he looked forward to working with her on the issue.
NEWS
April 8, 2014
According to The Sun, Maryland legislators will pass a bill that would decriminalize possession of 10 grams or less of pot ( "Assembly set to pass wage, marijuana bills," April 7). This is a breakthrough bill, especially promoted by the Black Caucus, that should be signed into law by Gov. Martin O'Malley. For far too long the government has continued unabated in its efforts to destroy lives for a simple possession charge of small amounts of weed. It's well past the time to stop the real "reefer madness" of our times, the annual national incarceration of 800,000 people for marijuana use. The lunacy of the past government practices has fallen on the convicted as they struggle to find work with a tainted record.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Of the nearly 150 bills Gov. Martin O'Malley signed into law Monday morning, one bore the name of a 5-year-old boy from South Baltimore who died in 2011 after a distracted driver chatting on his cellphone plowed into the back of Jake Owen's family car without hitting the brakes. On Monday, the little boy's family watched the governor sign what has become known as "Jake's Law" into the books, creating stiffer penalties and jail time for anyone who causes a serious or fatal car crash while texting or talking on phone.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
- A proposal by a Maryland congressman to block the decriminalization of marijuana in the District of Columbia has devolved into a war of words - with some D.C. advocates calling on Washingtonians to boycott the beaches of the Eastern Shore this summer in protest. Rep. Andy Harris, Maryland's only Republican in Congress, set off the controversy last week by attaching an amendment to a federal funding bill that would stop the district from enforcing the decriminalization law signed by Mayor Vincent Gray in March.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
- A proposal by a Maryland congressman to block the decriminalization of marijuana in the District of Columbia has devolved into a war of words - with some D.C. advocates calling on Washingtonians to boycott the beaches of the Eastern Shore this summer in protest. Rep. Andy Harris, Maryland's only Republican in Congress, set off the controversy last week by attaching an amendment to a federal funding bill that would stop the district from enforcing the decriminalization law signed by Mayor Vincent Gray in March.
NEWS
May 16, 2014
We, members of the Marijuana Policy Coalition of Maryland, write in response to the editorial, "Spin control," that appeared on May 8. Our coalition is non-partisan and does not endorse candidates. We take no position on the Maryland gubernatorial race. The purpose of this letter is to set the record straight. Our coalition promotes honest, fact-based dialogue regarding marijuana use and the impact of its criminalization and advocates for the safe, effective, efficient regulation and taxation of the sale of marijuana in Maryland for adults.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | May 7, 2014
Apparently following its head rather than its heart, the activist group Progressive Maryland threw its support behind Lt. Anthony G. Brown in the Democratic race for governor -- passing on the chance to embrace the liberal candidacy of Del. Heather R. Mizeur of Montgomery County. Elbridge James, chairman of the group, said Progressive Maryland decided to endorse Brown after "a lot of discussion and re-discussion. " "We love Heather," said James, but at the end of the day the group's 24-member vote decided that Brown was the most viable candidate.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
As prosecutors across Maryland wait for the new law that will remove criminal penalties for possessing small amounts of marijuana, they're taking a patchwork approach in the way they handle such cases. In some counties, including Harford and Carroll, state's attorneys are taking a hard line, continuing to seek criminal convictions that carry the threat of jail time and fines for offenders. But in Baltimore County and some other localities, prosecutors have become more lenient, knowing that on Oct. 1 possession of small amounts of pot will trigger nothing more than a civil fine.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
Marijuana decriminalization keeps in place the tax-free, gangster-subsidizing, anarchistic black market for pot ("O'Malley signs 'Jake's Law,' marijuana decriminalization," April 14). Only complete legalization deprives the gangsters of the $193.1 million a year that retail pot sales are worth in Maryland. That's based on Colorado's $14 million first-month retail sales of pot. The actual gateway to pot for kids is the existing prohibition. Politicians who support the continued prohibition of pot, including decriminalization, are only supporting the gangsters and abusers having unfettered, tax-free access to kids on the street.
NEWS
By Mark Puente and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Now that the state's medical marijuana program has been revived, officials say it will take about 15 months for the first patients to buy the drug legally in Maryland. Shannon Moore hopes her twin sons survive. Her 3-year-olds, Nicolas and Byron, already have lived longer than expected while battling as many as 30 seizures a day from Miller-Dieker syndrome, a disease that causes brain deformities. Moore hopes a marijuana extract will reduce their seizures. "The hardest part is feeling hopeless," the Frederick resident said.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 12, 1995
What do you suppose the reaction would be to a U.S. senator's proposition that the use of cocaine and heroin be legalized? Lots of yakety-yak on talk radio? Ted Koppel doing a few nights of "Nightline" on the subject?Decriminalization is the occasional gruel of talk-show conversation. It is not a line item in the "Contract with America." Though there's merit to the argument that legalizing drugs would reduce the violent crime associated with its commerce, a long political crusade would be necessary to galvanize the nation in ,, support.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
In 2010, Baltimore City police made 64,525 arrests, and more than 7,000 of them - 11 percent of the total - were for simple possession of marijuana. That represents thousands of man-hours by Baltimore City police, Central Booking officials, prosecutors, public defenders, judges and others, all of whom had better things to do. That year Baltimore recorded 224 homicides, ranking it among the five deadliest cities in the nation. And the enforcement of laws against possession of marijuana isn't just an issue in Baltimore; overall, the state logged more than 22,000 marijuana possession arrests in 2010, the third most per capita of any state in the nation.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Of the nearly 150 bills Gov. Martin O'Malley signed into law Monday morning, one bore the name of a 5-year-old boy from South Baltimore who died in 2011 after a distracted driver chatting on his cellphone plowed into the back of Jake Owen's family car without hitting the brakes. On Monday, the little boy's family watched the governor sign what has become known as "Jake's Law" into the books, creating stiffer penalties and jail time for anyone who causes a serious or fatal car crash while texting or talking on phone.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.