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NEWS
December 18, 2012
It is not surprising that people such as Prince George's County Executive Rushern L. Baker III are calling again for an increase in the gas tax ("Calls for new road and transit funding," Dec. 13). Look around at all the other transportation projects that no one except the politicians wanted: the Intercounty Connector (billions of dollars), the Interstate 95 express toll lanes (billions more), the construction at I-95 and Route 24 (millions on top of that). It goes on and on. The politicians seem to think taxpayers are an endless supply of funds, yet if you look at what they are doing at White Marsh Boulevard and have done at Route 24, they've put in more traffic signals which will cause us to waste more gas. It is ridiculous, and I am hoping the taxpayers recognize the politicians seem to no longer have the taxpayers' best interests in mind but some other interests.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Major health insurer CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield has asked the state to let it increase its rates in the individual marketplace by as much as 30 percent on average next year, but two competitors want to lower what they charge people who don't get coverage through an employer. The requests were released Friday by the Maryland Insurance Administration, whose officials emphasized that they could require modifications. The agency cut significantly the rate increase CareFirst had requested for this year.
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NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | January 30, 1995
Major crime decreased 2.5 percent in Westminster in 1994, city police reported, but total calls for assistance increased by nearly 10 percent over 1993."
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
The Chesapeake Bay's blue crab population remains in a serious slump for the second straight year, with the number of females dropping to a dangerously low level, officials announced Thursday. Severe winter weather, not overfishing, is largely to blame, officials said. But to improve chances of a rebound, Maryland and Virginia both plan to cut back on the bay harvest this year - a move likely to hurt the region's struggling watermen and cost crab-loving consumers, pushing high prices higher still.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1998
Even as Howard County and state officials prepare for county participation in the National Night Out Against Crime this evening, police yesterday released crime statistics for the first half of 1998 that show a dramatic decrease in nearly every offense.Sgt. Morris Carroll, a police spokesman, attributed the decline to better enforcement."We're focusing on targeting those people we think are career criminals," Carroll said.Robberies decreased 14.6 percent, from 89 during the first six months of 1997 to 76 this year.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
Revenue at Maryland's three casinos in March reached $58 million, with two that have been opened for at least a year seeing a decrease from a year earlier, the Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency reported Friday. Hollywood Casino Perryville in Cecil County generated $9.48 million for the month from slot machines and newly introduced gaming tables - a decrease of $4.24 million, or nearly 35 percent, from a year ago. The Casino at Ocean Downs in Worcester County reported revenue of $3.95 million - a decrease of $130,622, or 3.2 percent, from the year before.
NEWS
By a Baltimore Sun reporter | July 2, 2010
Baltimore County Police reported a decline in several crime categories including homicides and rape in the first quarter of this year when compared to last. Of the eight serious crime categories, seven have seen a decrease from January to March this year when compared with the same period in 2009, police said. Homicides declined by 55.6 percent, rape decreased by 44.7 percent, motor vehicle theft by 29.3 percent, robbery by 17.6 percent, burglary by 4.6 percent, arson by 13.2 percent and theft by 6.8 percent, according to police.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1998
After decreasing its property tax three consecutive years, Sykesville has decided to keep the rate at 77 cents for fiscal 1999, which begins July 1.Property taxes, paid per $100 of assessed value, account for $520,000 in revenues in the $1.5 million budget adopted last night. Town residents pay county taxes at $2.62.Councilman Michael Burgoyne, budget committee chairman, pushed for a 1-cent decrease but was outvoted 3 to 1. The budget committee had also voted 4 to 2 against the decrease."We can accomplish a good, sound future for the town and still decrease the tax rate," Burgoyne said.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
Baltimore officials transported 37 homeless people to an emergency overflow shelter Tuesday after a heavy snowstorm struck the region. "We had 55 encounters," said Connor Scott, a spokesman for the city's Office of Emergency Management. "Eighteen refused to come with us. " The city issued a Code Blue alert Tuesday after the storm dumped up to 11 inches in parts of the Baltimore metro area, which prompted officials to open the shelter in the 200 block of Guilford Avenue. The shelter had last opened earlier this month when the polar vortex brought an extreme cold snap to the region.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
Anne Arundel County government has saved $38 million in contracting costs for construction projects in the past year, officials announced Monday. The six percent in savings on $615 million in capital projects, through decreases in “change orders,” was achieved through several measures, including revisions to the negotiation process between the county's Department of Public Works and design consultants. The county also hired, with the approval of the County Council, two project control specialists, whose job is to scrutinize change order requests.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Federal employment is expected to drop sharply in the span of a decade, government projections show, as budget cuts and retirements begin to reshape the workforce. While U.S. employment will likely grow nearly 11 percent from 2012 through 2022, federal jobs will shrink by about 14 percent to 2.4 million workers, according to estimates released by the Department of Labor in December. The federal workforce stands to lose 407,000 jobs and see the largest percentage decrease of any service-providing industry.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler released details Wednesday night of his proposal to cut Maryland's corporate income tax to Virginia levels, saying that if he is elected governor he would decrease it gradually over a period of nine years. Appearing at a Baltimore Sun Newsmaker Forum, Gansler continued his criticism of the O'Malley administration for what he calls its 40 tax increases. However, the attorney general also said he would not seek to reverse them. Instead, he said he would ask tax experts to address the tax strategies of the state in broad terms.
NEWS
By Oxiris Barbot | January 22, 2014
It is certainly not news that obesity is a growing health problem in this country and in the city of Baltimore. What is alarming, however, is that obesity has a disproportionately higher rate and impact on low-income, non-white populations in America. The city of Baltimore is no exception with a 36 percent obesity rate, including a 45.3 percent rate among African-Americans. Our goal in Baltimore is to decrease the number of adults who are obese by 15 percent by 2015. We have the opportunity to provide our communities with the tools and support they need to improve their health and slow this trend for the next generation.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
Baltimore officials transported 37 homeless people to an emergency overflow shelter Tuesday after a heavy snowstorm struck the region. "We had 55 encounters," said Connor Scott, a spokesman for the city's Office of Emergency Management. "Eighteen refused to come with us. " The city issued a Code Blue alert Tuesday after the storm dumped up to 11 inches in parts of the Baltimore metro area, which prompted officials to open the shelter in the 200 block of Guilford Avenue. The shelter had last opened earlier this month when the polar vortex brought an extreme cold snap to the region.
SPORTS
By Nicholas Fouriezos, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Adrienne Dulaj, a social worker from White Marsh, spends most of her days working in areas that she considers dangerous. Also an avid runner, Dulaj has to schedule her workouts to avoid those same neighborhoods at night. "I don't want to be in some of these areas in the day sometimes," she said. "I just don't do it if it's not the right time of day. I like to know someone is around. " With the Baltimore Running Festival and other popular fall footraces fast approaching, local runners have had to take care deciding where and when they run. Some have struggled in recent weeks as daylight has grown scarce on either side of normal business hours.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
When plans called for a Harrah's to rise not far from M&T Bank Stadium, the Baltimore casino was slated to have 3,750 video lottery terminals delivering 67 percent of revenue to the state. Instead, a Horseshoe casino - a brand known for its ties to big-money poker games - will fill the vacant lot on Russell Street. It will house 2,500 slots, with the leftover space used in part to accommodate 900 seats around 130 table games. The state receives only 20 percent of table games revenue.
NEWS
April 9, 1994
In yesterday's Business section, an article about Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc. incorrectly reported the decrease in March sales for stores operating for at least one year. The actual drop was 21 percent.The Sun regrets the errors.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1992
This Annapolis-based operator of cellular telephone systems in the South and Southwest reported a net loss of $1.7 million for the third quarter, representing an improvement over the $3.5 million loss it reported for the same quarter last year.Celutel said the decrease in its net loss was the result of improving economies of scale it is experiencing from operations in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas and Jackson, Miss. A reduction in interest expense also contributed to the decrease in its loss, the company said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
After an X-ray taken of Alex Len's painful left ankle in early March came back negative, the the former Maryland center told his coaches that the pain began to decrease, a university spokesman said Saturday in explaining why Len didn't undergo an MRI until nearly a month later. The treatment by the school's training staff of Len - the potential No. 1 overall pick in Thursday's NBA draft - was called into question during an interview the former Terp conducted recently with NBA analysts Jalen Rose and Bill Simmons as part of their regular "Job Interview" segment with potential lottery picks.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
The Baltimore school system ranked second among the nation's 100 largest school districts in how much it spent per pupil in fiscal year 2011, according to data released Tuesday by the U.S. Census Bureau. The city's $15,483 per-pupil expenditure was second to New York City's $19,770. Rounding out the top five were Montgomery County, which spent $15,421; Milwaukee public schools at $14,244; and Prince George's County public schools, which spent $13,775. The Census Bureau also noted the first decrease in per-pupil spending nationally since 1977, the year the figures were first tracked.
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