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By Nate Rabner and The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Joey Jobes' workshop is a small, two-story building in Havre de Grace, minutes from the Susquehanna Flats at the top of the Chesapeake Bay. The space is dominated by saws, knives, paints and hundreds of blocks in various stages of transforming into ducks, geese and other birds. Most horizontal surfaces are covered in tools and supplies, but Jobes seems to know where everything is. "My life is business," Jobes said. A second-generation decoy carver in the self-proclaimed decoy capital of the world, he has been in his business for most of his 48 years and goes about it with practiced ease.
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SPORTS
By Nate Rabner and The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Joey Jobes' workshop is a small, two-story building in Havre de Grace, minutes from the Susquehanna Flats at the top of the Chesapeake Bay. The space is dominated by saws, knives, paints and hundreds of blocks in various stages of transforming into ducks, geese and other birds. Most horizontal surfaces are covered in tools and supplies, but Jobes seems to know where everything is. "My life is business," Jobes said. A second-generation decoy carver in the self-proclaimed decoy capital of the world, he has been in his business for most of his 48 years and goes about it with practiced ease.
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NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 12, 2004
Back when the ducks in the skies over Maryland were as plentiful as the leaves on the trees, Harry Jobes, a waterman and duck hunter, began carving his own wooden decoys to lure the birds into shooting range. His son, Bob Jobes, recalls the old-timers swapping hunting stories and whittling as they sat around the stove after a day out on the boats. So he took up the pastime, too. Today the water holds no future for the Jobeses, but their hobby does. Carving has replaced crabbing as the mainstay for the Jobeses -- father Harry, 67, and sons Bob, Joey and Charles -- whose nationally known work has become symbolic of the Havre de Grace wooden decoy tradition.
SPORTS
By Ellen Fishel, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
Henry Stansbury is pure Maryland. His family has been here since the 1650s. He grew up in Mount Washington, played lacrosse for the Terps in the early 1960s and now splits his time between his houses in Catonsville and on the Eastern Shore. And his love for the state and its history also led him to one of his greatest passions - decoy collecting. Hand-carved decoys, once used for waterfowl hunting and now appreciated as art, have a rich history in the Chesapeake Bay region.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 12, 2004
Back when the ducks in the skies over Maryland were as plentiful as the leaves on the trees, Harry Jobes, a waterman and duck hunter, began carving his own wooden decoys to lure the birds into shooting range. His son, Bob Jobes, recalls the old-timers swapping hunting stories and whittling as they sat around the stove after a day out on the boats. So he took up the pastime, too. Today the water holds no future for the Jobeses, but their hobby does. Carving has replaced crabbing as the mainstay for the Jobeses - father Harry, 67, and sons Bob, Joey and Charles - whose nationally known work has become symbolic of the Havre de Grace wooden decoy tradition.
BUSINESS
By Pat Emory and Pat Emory,Special to The Sun | September 13, 1990
OAK HALL, Va. -- Anywhere else these lathes might be cutting baseball bats, but on Virginia's Eastern Shore, where another sport struck out America's favorite pastime, a factory has adapted the lathes to cut life-sized wooden ducks, geese and shore birds.Each year, about 75,000 decoys take flight from Stoney PoinDecoys Ltd. in Oak Hall to nest in homes all over the country.These are the kits that make up three-quarters of Stoney PoinDecoys' $1.5 million business. The kits range in price from $16 for rough-cut ducks and geese to $195 for a ready-to-sand and ready-to-paint "swan in repose."
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | March 23, 2008
Gothenburg, Sweden -- That's a crazy dateline for a Maryland outdoors column, but what the heck, that's where we are. This town on Sweden's west coast is deep in fish. There's a huge statue in the middle of town of the Greek god Poseidon squeezing the daylights out of a fish locals swear is a cod but I think looks like a shark. There's a fishing museum, but it's closed until spring, which I believe begins July 18 this year. And then there's lutefisk. Don't touch it, let alone taste it. The air-dried fish doctored with lye would take the bugs off headlights.
SPORTS
December 27, 1991
Large numbers of live decoys are being used on private and state lands in Maryland, in violation of federal regulations, the Department of Natural Resources announced yesterday.Live decoys are free-flying, captive-reared waterfowl that are released to attract wild birds. "Some birds, because of their rearing conditions, are reluctant to leave an area once they settle. In doing so, they attract other live waterfowl, making them easy targets for hunters," said DNR secretary Torrey C. Brown.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | November 16, 1991
If Tydings Owen McGinnis had known selling 45 stuffed Canada geese decoys was a federal offense, he says he certainly wouldn't have advertised the sale of the birds in the newspaper."
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Sun Staff Corespondent | March 25, 1991
TALL TIMBERS -- Sometimes as early as 4 in the morning or as late as 10 at night, Tommy Deagle slips out the back door of the tiny frame house on a cove off St. George Creek and ambles the few yards to his workshop to carve.And sometimes he just spends all day in the duck blind in the marsh only a few yards from his front door in St. Mary's County, watching the birds to get a better feel for their coloring, the shapes of their heads or the way they arch their necks and preen their feathers.
NEWS
By Brittany Santarpio, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2011
Originally designed to lure in waterfowl, these Chesapeake icons will attract more people than birds at the Havre de Grace Decoy and Wildlife Art Festival. In its 30th year, the festival promises to deliver a sense of heritage to the region. Over a 140 artists will exhibit and sell their original work, while attendees enjoy retriever dog demonstrations, decoy carving competitions, live and silent auctions and children's activities. The plan: Festival guests can come and go as they please with a free shuttle service to all venues.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2010
Dr. Robert R. Holthaus, a retired pediatrician who cared for thousands of Baltimore-area children during his nearly 30-year career and a noted autograph collector, died Sunday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Glen Arm resident was 71. The son of a Baltimore police officer and a homemaker, Dr. Holthaus was born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown. He was a 1957 graduate of Patterson High School and earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1961.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
Margaret W. Todd, an artist and dressmaker, died Sept. 25 of a heart attack at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 82. Margaret Weldon, whose father was the owner and manager of the Candler Building and whose mother was a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Govans. She was a 1946 graduate of Eastern High School and studied art in Baltimore. The next year, she married Claude W. Todd Jr., who worked for the old Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. The couple settled into a home on Yarmouth Road in Wiltondale, where they raised their family and she worked as a designer and a dressmaker.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach | February 13, 2010
William K. Brendle, a private-practice physician for more than three decades who spent much of his retirement carving duck decoys and volunteering at the Havre de Grace Decoy Museum, died Feb. 4 at his home in Havre de Grace. He was 89. Born in Long Island, N.Y., Dr. Brendle graduated from the University of Maryland, College Park. He earned his medical degree from the University of Maryland, Baltimore, training both there and at nearby Mercy and Maryland General hospitals. During World War II, he served as a flight surgeon in the Army Air Forces, eventually retiring with the rank of lieutenant colonel from the Maryland Air National Guard.
TRAVEL
November 8, 2009
Waterfowl Festival Where: : Easton; follow signs to free parking and then use the continuous free bus service to visit the exhibits. When: : 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 15 What: : The three-day festival celebrates and includes art, music, food, wine, games and more. Displays offer fine art to folk art, photographs, paintings and decorative wood carvings and decoys. Demonstrations include sharpshooting, a birds of prey flight show, and duck and goose callers competing in World Championship Calling Contests.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | March 23, 2008
Gothenburg, Sweden -- That's a crazy dateline for a Maryland outdoors column, but what the heck, that's where we are. This town on Sweden's west coast is deep in fish. There's a huge statue in the middle of town of the Greek god Poseidon squeezing the daylights out of a fish locals swear is a cod but I think looks like a shark. There's a fishing museum, but it's closed until spring, which I believe begins July 18 this year. And then there's lutefisk. Don't touch it, let alone taste it. The air-dried fish doctored with lye would take the bugs off headlights.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
Margaret W. Todd, an artist and dressmaker, died Sept. 25 of a heart attack at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 82. Margaret Weldon, whose father was the owner and manager of the Candler Building and whose mother was a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Govans. She was a 1946 graduate of Eastern High School and studied art in Baltimore. The next year, she married Claude W. Todd Jr., who worked for the old Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. The couple settled into a home on Yarmouth Road in Wiltondale, where they raised their family and she worked as a designer and a dressmaker.
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