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By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | June 27, 1993
Q:My 14-inch high, covered, two-handle ceramic urn (missing its finial) is decorated with a blue and gold swag and an American eagle in a medallion. It's marked "A Mot tahedeh Design 7001 Italy." A friend thought it might be old and valuable. Is it?A: Mottahedeh & Co., the Stamford, Conn., based creator and importer of porcelain dinnerware and decorative accessories, has been reproducing antique china and decorative accessories since 1927, specializing in licensed reproductions for institutions such as Winterthur, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Historic Charleston, and the National Trust for Historic Preservation.
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By SUSAN REIMER | August 20, 2000
My house didn't seem small until my kids became teen-agers. Now everything seems too small, including dinner, my bank balance and the size of their beds. It would not make sense to add more furniture to this house, any more than it would make sense to add more people. The result is I have had to find another outlet for my decorative urges, so I have moved outside. As my husband has observed, I appear to be furnishing the yard. I prefer to call it accessorizing the yard. We don't exactly live on the Ponderosa.
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By Linda Lowe Morris | February 17, 1991
It finally became too much for Nancy Kantarian -- staring across the desk at all those happy people. After three years of working at Maryland National Bank in the department that handles loans to small businesses, she'd talked to dozens, maybe hundreds of entrepreneurs who were going off to follow their own dreams."
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By Elizabeth Large | October 5, 1997
Museum qualityIf you'd like to take home what you see in the Victoria & Albert Museum's touring exhibit, which comes to the Baltimore Museum of Art this month, you'll want to know about the V&A licensing program -- collections of decorative accessories and giftware inspired by the exhibit. They include china, lamps, pewter, candlesticks and sculpture, among many other items. Shown are the head of a jade horse from Austin Sculpture and a majolica plate from Lotus Arts & Windmere, inspired by 16th-century Italian earthenware.
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By Elizabeth Large | April 23, 1995
"Yard sale" is a misnomer: This is an upscale event involving a quarter of a million dollars of merchandise. Each year the Maryland Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers holds a glorified yard sale with bargains on new and antique furniture, rugs, fabrics, wall coverings, decorative accessories and art. New this year at the sale is bargain design advice from professionals at a cost of $25 for half an hour.It's all being held at the David Edward Co., 1407 Parker Road, Saturday and April 30, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The $3 door charge will go to the American Cancer Society's Hope Lodge.
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By Elizabeth Large | August 14, 1994
Fashion designer Calvin Klein is known for his stunningly classic lines and colors with names like dove, vanilla, parchment and ink. Look for those characteristics in his new home collection, which will debut next year. Calvin Klein Inc. has licensed the use of its trademark to Home Innovations Inc. to produce sheets, towels, silverware, glassware, dinnerware, furniture and other decorative accessories for the home.You'll be able to find his lines in department and specialty stores, as well as a flagship store scheduled to open next spring on Madison Avenue in New York.
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By LINDA LOWE MORRIS | April 5, 1992
One morning a couple of weeks ago Janinne Rodgers came to work with an idea, an image from a dream she'd had the night before.In her dream she'd seen a rabbit leaping across a deep blue sky. Her partner, Judy Hillman, heard the dream and within hours had translated it into paint across the back of a whimsically painted settee.For the past two years Ms. Rodgers and Ms. Hillman have been combining talents and offering the results for sale at the Milk House on York Road in Sparks. There they sell their painted furniture, their wreaths and arrangements of dried and silk flowers, plus assorted accessories and bundles of individual dried flowers.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 17, 1994
Q: We're about to undertake a major renovation of our home. Walls are coming down, the kitchen and bathroom are being redesigned, recessed lighting is being installed, and we're adding new furniture.We're pretty certain of what we want done, but we're unsure about how to proceed. What's the proper sequence in a complicated process like this? Where should we start, and what should follow after that?A: What your project really needs is a good coordinator -- someone who can orchestrate all its various facets.
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By Michael Walsh and Michael Walsh,Universal Press Syndicate | August 11, 1991
Once regarded as a fairly innocuous if not frivolous enterprise, home decorating may soon become downright controversial. Get ready now, because the debate will be coming soon to a living room near you.The issue? Whether it is right and reasonable to use animal-derived materials for household adornment. It may sound silly at first, but I suspect the battle lines are already being drawn.Increased environmental sensitivity, the raging war over fur coats, the debate over using live animals in medical and cosmetic research, the animal rights movement and the ever-growing list of endangered species are already prompting some of us to question our own preferences for certain decorating styles -- from Southwest to hunting lodge to out-of-Africa chic.
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By Elizabeth Large | October 5, 1997
Museum qualityIf you'd like to take home what you see in the Victoria & Albert Museum's touring exhibit, which comes to the Baltimore Museum of Art this month, you'll want to know about the V&A licensing program -- collections of decorative accessories and giftware inspired by the exhibit. They include china, lamps, pewter, candlesticks and sculpture, among many other items. Shown are the head of a jade horse from Austin Sculpture and a majolica plate from Lotus Arts & Windmere, inspired by 16th-century Italian earthenware.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large | November 7, 1996
What an amazing thing an ornament is: as fragile as fine crystal, but able to bear the memories of all those holidays past.With the weight of so much tradition behind these bright reminders of special times, it seems strange to talk of trends. Angels and snowmen, red-coated Santas, silvery stars -- surely these are constants. But the truth is that ornaments, like other home accessories, follow the whims of fashion.The current decorative interest in "green" themes is reflected in Old World ornaments shaped like fruits and vegetables.
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By Elizabeth Large | April 23, 1995
"Yard sale" is a misnomer: This is an upscale event involving a quarter of a million dollars of merchandise. Each year the Maryland Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers holds a glorified yard sale with bargains on new and antique furniture, rugs, fabrics, wall coverings, decorative accessories and art. New this year at the sale is bargain design advice from professionals at a cost of $25 for half an hour.It's all being held at the David Edward Co., 1407 Parker Road, Saturday and April 30, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The $3 door charge will go to the American Cancer Society's Hope Lodge.
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff Writer | March 12, 1995
Finally: Someone in the interior design business whose house doesn't look picture perfect.Jho has a basket of children's toys sitting in her living room.Things piled on her kitchen counters.A sitting room overflowing with clutter.Someone whose home looks like yours and mine.Except that Mary Pat Andrea's Victorian town house in Baltimore is beautiful and fresh-looking and enormously appealing, in spite of the fact that it's obviously lived in. That's the difference.How does she do it, this 45-year-old mother of a 5-year-old and owner of six decorative accessories shops in Baltimore and Wisconsin?
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | August 14, 1994
Fashion designer Calvin Klein is known for his stunningly classic lines and colors with names like dove, vanilla, parchment and ink. Look for those characteristics in his new home collection, which will debut next year. Calvin Klein Inc. has licensed the use of its trademark to Home Innovations Inc. to produce sheets, towels, silverware, glassware, dinnerware, furniture and other decorative accessories for the home.You'll be able to find his lines in department and specialty stores, as well as a flagship store scheduled to open next spring on Madison Avenue in New York.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 17, 1994
Q: We're about to undertake a major renovation of our home. Walls are coming down, the kitchen and bathroom are being redesigned, recessed lighting is being installed, and we're adding new furniture.We're pretty certain of what we want done, but we're unsure about how to proceed. What's the proper sequence in a complicated process like this? Where should we start, and what should follow after that?A: What your project really needs is a good coordinator -- someone who can orchestrate all its various facets.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Contributing Writer Universal Press Syndicate | October 3, 1993
She doesn't do chintz. She leaves that to Mario Buatta. She prefers relaxed interiors to glamorous formal ones. She doesn't even stick to one style. She'll jump from Swedish to English to Italian and then, surprise! She'll sprinkle in a little Balinese. Jena Hall's inspirations can't be tied to a singular design style.Her name may not command the instant recognition of Ralph Lauren, but in just five years, under the label "Inspirations," a "total designer look at affordable prices," the designer has more than 4,500 licensed products for the home, with retail sales in excess of $20 million.
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff Writer | March 12, 1995
Finally: Someone in the interior design business whose house doesn't look picture perfect.Jho has a basket of children's toys sitting in her living room.Things piled on her kitchen counters.A sitting room overflowing with clutter.Someone whose home looks like yours and mine.Except that Mary Pat Andrea's Victorian town house in Baltimore is beautiful and fresh-looking and enormously appealing, in spite of the fact that it's obviously lived in. That's the difference.How does she do it, this 45-year-old mother of a 5-year-old and owner of six decorative accessories shops in Baltimore and Wisconsin?
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | April 7, 1991
This spring Maria Price looked at the wreaths she was making and decided to experiment.They were big, beautiful circles made from a whole rainbow of colors in dried flowers and herbs -- just the thing for rooms full of rocking chairs and flowered chintzes, polished antiques and ruffled curtains. But that was the problem, she thought."Not everyone has a Colonial or country decor," she says. "People with a contemporary design or even a southwestern look would like something different from what most wreaths are made to look like."
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By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | June 27, 1993
Q:My 14-inch high, covered, two-handle ceramic urn (missing its finial) is decorated with a blue and gold swag and an American eagle in a medallion. It's marked "A Mot tahedeh Design 7001 Italy." A friend thought it might be old and valuable. Is it?A: Mottahedeh & Co., the Stamford, Conn., based creator and importer of porcelain dinnerware and decorative accessories, has been reproducing antique china and decorative accessories since 1927, specializing in licensed reproductions for institutions such as Winterthur, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Historic Charleston, and the National Trust for Historic Preservation.
FEATURES
By LINDA LOWE MORRIS | April 5, 1992
One morning a couple of weeks ago Janinne Rodgers came to work with an idea, an image from a dream she'd had the night before.In her dream she'd seen a rabbit leaping across a deep blue sky. Her partner, Judy Hillman, heard the dream and within hours had translated it into paint across the back of a whimsically painted settee.For the past two years Ms. Rodgers and Ms. Hillman have been combining talents and offering the results for sale at the Milk House on York Road in Sparks. There they sell their painted furniture, their wreaths and arrangements of dried and silk flowers, plus assorted accessories and bundles of individual dried flowers.
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