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June 8, 2011
For some old-fashioned fun, bring the family to the bike decorating contest and parade followed by an ice cream social Friday, June 10, 6:30-8:30 p.m., at the Laurel Armory Anderson and Murphy Community Center, 422 Montgomery St. Kids can decorate their bikes and scooters inside the armory (bike helmets must be worn). Then a parade starts at 7:15 p.m. on Montgomery Street between Fourth and Fifth streets. Ice cream social follows the parade. Sponsored by the Laurel Department of Parks and Recreation, and Laurel Police Department.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Mary Veiga practices the art of deception -- but only in the most respectable of ways. Since 1995, she has been plying her skills in decorative painting, which includes murals, faux finishing and trompe l'oeil for homeowners and businesses. With her, every assignment is a custom job and a new challenge that excites. “Trompe l'oeil is French for 'deceive the eye,' so it's a technique for using realistic imagery [and] shadows to create an optical illusion to make [the work] look three-dimensional,” said the Baltimore-based artist, who attended the Maryland Institute College of Art. “Faux painting, again French, means 'false' and is an old art form used to describe a paint finish replicating a real material such as marble, stone or wood.
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NEWS
By Claire Whitcomb and Claire Whitcomb,Universal Press Syndicate | January 25, 2004
The usual cure for the decorating blahs is shopping. But hold your credit card. Mariette Himes Gomez, one of New York's leading decorators, says that if there's something wrong with your scheme, don't go on a collecting binge. Just take away a pillow or two. The extra breathing space might just be what your room needs. Gomez, a master of the sort of understatement that creates soothing, comfortable rooms, offers decorating Rx aplenty in her new book, Rooms: Creating Luxurious, Livable Spaces (Regan Books, $39.95)
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
With shabby-chic design back in high demand, there's no shortage of mass-produced decor disguised as antiques. But the genuine article - the old form reclaimed with a new function - is much harder to come by. With a nod to the Depression-era adage, “Waste not, want not,” these are the stories of three artistic visionaries giving new life to items once thought to be years past their prime. Old Wood, New Furniture General Manager James Battaglia is one of five men running Baltimore's Sandtown Millworks, hand-building furniture made almost entirely from the discarded innards of the city's rowhouses.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | October 23, 1994
For those uncertain about buying home accessories and antiques, Dan Carithers, a nationally known interior designer, recently offered these tips at a design seminar sponsored by Southern Accents magazine:* Be confident about exploring new styles. "Expose yourself to new things all the time."* Consider all price ranges. "Good design doesn't have to have a giant price tag."* Personalize reproductions. "Begin with store-bought furniture but glaze it, sand it, do something to take the 'new' off."
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair | November 1, 1992
When looking for a new home, prospective buyers are often seduced by large, empty spaces. That's quite understandable, given the general shrinkage in the size of living accommodations over the past several years. The temptation to snap up a spacious contemporary home is especially acute when someone wishes to move from a tiny apartment or from a renovated residence that has been broken up into numerous small rooms and corridors.But open and airy spaces may prove to be less wonderful than initially imagined.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 1999
EACH YEAR, visitors to Crofton are welcomed by the sparkling lights of a Christmas tree in front of the Crofton Country Club. The lighting ceremony, which typically features local politicians, music, refreshments and a visit from Santa -- was scheduled for last night.My favorite community Christmas tree is the one behind Town Hall. This tree doesn't have lights. The ornaments filling its branches are not always elegant or sophisticated. Still, the decorating ceremony for the Town Hall tree, held Saturday morning, was full of love, fun and excitement about the holidays.
NEWS
By Jill L. Kubatko and Jill L. Kubatko,Staff writer | September 15, 1991
Borders, expanded vinyl, coordinating prints, ready-made ensembles and fabricated vertical blinds -- that sums up what's new in wallpapercoverings and design this year.Interior designers are finding the "fully-coordinated" look is in for their customers. Wallpaper patterns match comforters, shams and dust ruffles, curtains and accent pillows. Bathrooms play host to coordinating shower curtains, window treatments and rugs.Kitchens and bathrooms are the most wallpapered rooms in the home, says Jim Forsythe, co-owner of Wallpapers to go at the Festival at Pasadena on Ritchie Highway.
FEATURES
By Mary Daniels and Mary Daniels,Chicago Tribune | December 20, 1992
Shortly after the turn of the century, a plain-looking woman whose only true love was beauty banished the heavy dark curtains, dark corners and sullen colors of her Victorian era in favor of "plenty of optimism and white paint," propelling interior design into the 20th century.Following her decorative gospel of simplicity, suitability and proportion, Elsie de Wolfe rejected the cluttery Victorian design standard and opened up horizons of decorating."I think that it was so fascinating that she did it in one fell swoop," says Nina Campbell, co-author with Caroline Seebohm of "Elsie de Wolfe, A Decorative Life" (Clarkson Potter, $35)
FEATURES
By Michael Walsh and Michael Walsh,Contributing Writer Universal Press Syndicate | December 5, 1993
What accounts for the staying power of certain throwback decorating trends? It may well be a collective craving for the look of longevity.What many of us are after is a decorating style that suggests permanence and rootedness. Socially footloose and financially fancy-free in the '80S, lots of us are now hunkering down, digging in and taking stock. Bombarded daily by the fallout from economic uncertainty, political and cultural turmoil, marriage, parenthood and careers, we're putting a real premium on stability, reliability and trustworthiness.
NEWS
Pete Pichaske and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
As a parade of designers and artisans swirls around him, Brian Keegan is an island of calm and a rock of assistance. He answers the telephone, keeps track of who comes and goes, replaces a few lightbulbs. It's his job for two months a year, and he loves it. Keegan, 73, is a “house sitter” for Historic Ellicott City's Decorator Show House, an annual event during which a historic Howard County property is restored, redecorated and opened to the public for a month.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Robert W. Weinhold Sr., a decorated Army Airborne Ranger in the Vietnam War who later worked for several financial institutions, died Monday at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center of kidney failure. He was 75. The son of Herman W. Weinhold, a textile millworker, and Mary Alice Weinhold, a homemaker, Robert Winway Weinhold was born and raised in Methuen, Mass., where he graduated in 1956 from Methuen High School. He enrolled at Norwich University in Northfield, Vt., where he was captain and quarterback for the university's football team.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Vietnamese food is a particularly attractive combination of fresh ingredients and familiar Asian flavors. Add the current popularity of its steamy noodle soup, pho, and it's no wonder that right now, Vietnamese food is hot, hot, hot. Indochine, which opened last May in an unassuming storefront in a Midtown stretch of Charles Street, covers the Vietnamese bases, from simple appetizers like rolls and dumplings to traditionally flavored rice dishes....
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
Frances W. Riepe, a former interior decorator who had been a trustee of Ladew Topiary Gardens, died May 16 of congestive heart failure at her home in the Brightwood retirement community in Lutherville. She was 91. The daughter of Francis Asbury Warner Jr., founder of the Warner-Graham Co., and Elsie McGee Warner, a homemaker, the former Frances Warner was born in Baltimore and raised on Hollen Road in Cedarcroft. She attended Bryn Mawr School and graduated in 1941 from the Knox School in Cooperstown, N.Y. In 1946, she married George Mitchell Stump Riepe, who later became president of the Warner-Graham Co. Mrs. Riepe earned a certificate in 1964 from the New York School of Interior Design and owned and operated an interior decorating firm from her Guilford home.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Molly O. Molter, the last surviving member of the family that owned Owens Yacht Co., who was known as "The Lady Boat Builder," died May 2 of respiratory failure at Genesis Eldercare Spa Creek Center in Annapolis. She was 104. The daughter of Charles C. Owens, a vice president of Westinghouse Electric Corp., and Mary Agnes Glynn Owens, a homemaker, the former Molly Glynn Owens was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and moved with her family to Detroit in 1912. In 1925, they settled in Annapolis, where Mrs. Molter graduated from high school.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
This year, the designers of the Baltimore Symphony Associates Decorators' Show House had an unusual problem: getting visitors to take their eyes off the views outside the $3.5 million penthouse on the 23rd floor of Silo Point long enough to look at the rooms inside. Their solutions included adding pops of bright orange, teal and green, and turning old industrial and nautical items into innovative design elements in 20 designed spaces. "The view will always trump, no matter what," says Laura Kimball, a show house veteran who returns this year leading a group of design students from the Community College of Baltimore County.
BUSINESS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1995
Here are some general guidelines gleaned from interviews with design professionals to help homeowners avoid common decorating mistakes.* Develop a master plan, listing what colors and design elements you would like to add in each room. Also, inventory furniture, artwork and accents you like and want to keep in each room and things that can be replaced or added later. "You need a master plan so you have an overall vision of what you want and what you can work toward," said designer Richard Taylor.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 2001
This year's annual decorating show by the Ferndale Garden Club, "'Tis the Holiday Season," will take place Wednesday at Michael's Eighth Avenue. The program is open to the public. Doors will open at 6:45 p.m. From 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., displays and demonstration booths will be set up so participants can learn holiday decorating and entertaining tips. Christmas cookies and holiday punch will be served during this time. The formal show will begin at 8 p.m. Demonstrations will include how to make a holiday arrangement using silk flowers by Bonnie Lear, a floral designer at A.C. Moore; hands-on bow making by Barbara Barillaro from Evergreen Gene's; using rubber stamps to make homemade Christmas cards, tags and packaging items, by Almee DeGrange, a Stampin' Up demonstrator; and Maria Price-Nowakowski of Willow Oak Herb Farm, who will share ways of using herbs during the holiday.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
- The Navy will award its highest non-combat decoration for heroism Friday to a Hagerstown sailor killed last month in a shooting in Norfolk, Va., officials said. Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark A. Mayo, who was assigned to Naval Security Forces at Naval Station Norfolk, was shielding a sailor from a civilian truck driver who had taken her gun during the March 24 confrontation aboard the destroyer USS Mahan, officials said. Mayo was 24. Jeffrey Tyrone Savage shot Mayo, officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Fells Point is known for a lot of things - cobblestone streets, fun bars, seafood - but Italian fare is not among them. Anastasia, the newest offering from Kali's Restaurant Group, could change that. The restaurant, which opened in January in the Thames Street space vacated by Meli (also a Kali's Group venture), bills itself as an "Italian bistro" and also as an upscale nightclub. Those two identities don't fit together perfectly, but as a restaurant, Anastasia gets the important stuff - the food and service - just right.
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