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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
Volunteers taking part in a cleanup at Leakin Park on Saturday morning discovered a decomposing body, police confirmed.  The body was discovered off of the 4900 block of N. Franklintown Rd., in the Southwestern District, at around 11 a.m. Police said volunteers were cleaning the area when they noticed what appeared to be a body in "severe stages of decomposition. "  There were no obvious signs of trauma or foul play, though a police spokeswoman said that was not unusual given the decomposition.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
Volunteers taking part in a cleanup at Leakin Park on Saturday morning discovered a decomposing body, police confirmed.  The body was discovered off of the 4900 block of N. Franklintown Rd., in the Southwestern District, at around 11 a.m. Police said volunteers were cleaning the area when they noticed what appeared to be a body in "severe stages of decomposition. "  There were no obvious signs of trauma or foul play, though a police spokeswoman said that was not unusual given the decomposition.
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NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1997
Police yesterday identified the body found in the basement of a North Laurel motel Monday afternoon as Belinda Jean Huber, 27, of Laurel and said she had been reported missing in February.Police view the death as suspicious and are awaiting the results of an autopsy, said Sgt. Steven E. Keller, spokesman for the Howard County police.Police said decomposition of the body made an immediate determination of the cause of death difficult.Huber, who was living with her boyfriend in the 400 block of Gorman Ave., was reported missing by her mother in February, police said.
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
A boater discovered decomposed remains in the Chesapeake Bay south of the Bay Bridge in Anne Arundel County shortly before noon on Sunday, Maryland Natural Resources Police said. The remains were sent to the Chief Medical Examiner's office in Baltimore for an autopsy, police said. Because of decomposition, the age, gender and race of the victim could not be determined, officials said. It could be weeks before the autopsy is completed and more details are revealed, a Natural Resources Police spokesman said Monday.
NEWS
By Howard Witt and Howard Witt,Chicago Tribune | June 17, 2007
HOUSTON, Texas -- There are a lot of necessary but unpleasant things - landfills, chemical plants and halfway houses being just a few - that can cause concerned homeowners to rush to the local zoning board to declare "Not in my back yard!" But some folks in the small city of San Marcos, Texas, recently dodged the ultimate NIMBY nightmare: a forensic research facility made up of dozens of dead human bodies left out in the open to rot. Otherwise known as "body farms," such facilities enable forensic anthropologists, medical examiners and police detectives to closely study the mechanics of decomposition on bodies that have been left out in the sun or buried in shallow graves or stuffed in the trunks of cars.
NEWS
May 17, 1992
"What, you're not recycling yard and garden debris?"This phrase is being heard more and more in the environmentally conscious '90s. And there's a reason for that. Now is the time to begin composting. In the past, homeowners thought composting was difficult -- or worse, that it was unsightly and created bad odors. That's just not true. In fact, you can successfully create compost to serve a variety of gardening purposes. To help you help yourself and the environment, the experts at Flowtron Outdoor Products, a leading manufacturer of composting equipment, offer answers to several commonly asked composting questions.
NEWS
July 17, 2009
Reisterstown man pleads guilty to sex trafficking A Reisterstown man pleaded guilty in federal court Thursday to being a pimp and selling sex with teenage girls, whose services he and a partner advertised on the Internet, according to the Maryland U.S. attorney's office. His plea agreement says Byron "B" Thompson, 25, and a co-conspirator ran a sex-trafficking business from October through April, recruiting the teens, ages 15 and 17, earlier this year. Thompson faces a minimum mandatory sentence of 10 years in prison.
NEWS
By Tommy Denton | August 23, 1995
AS IN THE CYCLE of nature, the cycle of politics contains dTC seasons of flowering and seasons of decomposition, which eventually provides the compost from which renewal, in time, may spring.Bill Bradley's announcement last week that he would not seek re-election to the Senate was an affirmation that the American body politic is snuggling into the torpor of a wintry political season of repose.Both Republican and Democratic partisans are sure to take issue with that conclusion, preferring to see the consequences of Bradley's departure through the thin prisms of their own self-serving perspectives.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
VATICAN CITY - For much of this week, hundreds of thousands of people waited in line to view a body, a scene that would have been morbid in any other city. But this is Rome, a city that reveres the bodies of its heroes. And it is also the heart of Catholicism - a church in which the human body holds a treasured position as the vehicle that God used to speak to man. People who flocked to St. Peter's Basilica to see the remains that once held the life of Pope John Paul II mostly said they wanted to pay respect to the life the pope led, not to the body he left behind.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 3, 2005
LHOKNGA, Indonesia - Two women wandered across a nearly barren landscape, one clutching a frying pan. They were looking for some sign of their sister, who was imprisoned here for supporting Aceh province's outlawed separatist movement. The women wanted to find their sister alive, or retrieve her body, but it was the frying pan they located amid the rubble. This was a thriving town of 3,000 to 5,000 people, with a military encampment, the jail and many homes. Now it is gone, swept away by the Dec. 26 tsunamis.
NEWS
July 17, 2009
Reisterstown man pleads guilty to sex trafficking A Reisterstown man pleaded guilty in federal court Thursday to being a pimp and selling sex with teenage girls, whose services he and a partner advertised on the Internet, according to the Maryland U.S. attorney's office. His plea agreement says Byron "B" Thompson, 25, and a co-conspirator ran a sex-trafficking business from October through April, recruiting the teens, ages 15 and 17, earlier this year. Thompson faces a minimum mandatory sentence of 10 years in prison.
NEWS
By Howard Witt and Howard Witt,Chicago Tribune | June 17, 2007
HOUSTON, Texas -- There are a lot of necessary but unpleasant things - landfills, chemical plants and halfway houses being just a few - that can cause concerned homeowners to rush to the local zoning board to declare "Not in my back yard!" But some folks in the small city of San Marcos, Texas, recently dodged the ultimate NIMBY nightmare: a forensic research facility made up of dozens of dead human bodies left out in the open to rot. Otherwise known as "body farms," such facilities enable forensic anthropologists, medical examiners and police detectives to closely study the mechanics of decomposition on bodies that have been left out in the sun or buried in shallow graves or stuffed in the trunks of cars.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
VATICAN CITY - For much of this week, hundreds of thousands of people waited in line to view a body, a scene that would have been morbid in any other city. But this is Rome, a city that reveres the bodies of its heroes. And it is also the heart of Catholicism - a church in which the human body holds a treasured position as the vehicle that God used to speak to man. People who flocked to St. Peter's Basilica to see the remains that once held the life of Pope John Paul II mostly said they wanted to pay respect to the life the pope led, not to the body he left behind.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 3, 2005
LHOKNGA, Indonesia - Two women wandered across a nearly barren landscape, one clutching a frying pan. They were looking for some sign of their sister, who was imprisoned here for supporting Aceh province's outlawed separatist movement. The women wanted to find their sister alive, or retrieve her body, but it was the frying pan they located amid the rubble. This was a thriving town of 3,000 to 5,000 people, with a military encampment, the jail and many homes. Now it is gone, swept away by the Dec. 26 tsunamis.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1997
Police yesterday identified the body found in the basement of a North Laurel motel Monday afternoon as Belinda Jean Huber, 27, of Laurel and said she had been reported missing in February.Police view the death as suspicious and are awaiting the results of an autopsy, said Sgt. Steven E. Keller, spokesman for the Howard County police.Police said decomposition of the body made an immediate determination of the cause of death difficult.Huber, who was living with her boyfriend in the 400 block of Gorman Ave., was reported missing by her mother in February, police said.
NEWS
By Tommy Denton | August 23, 1995
AS IN THE CYCLE of nature, the cycle of politics contains dTC seasons of flowering and seasons of decomposition, which eventually provides the compost from which renewal, in time, may spring.Bill Bradley's announcement last week that he would not seek re-election to the Senate was an affirmation that the American body politic is snuggling into the torpor of a wintry political season of repose.Both Republican and Democratic partisans are sure to take issue with that conclusion, preferring to see the consequences of Bradley's departure through the thin prisms of their own self-serving perspectives.
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
A boater discovered decomposed remains in the Chesapeake Bay south of the Bay Bridge in Anne Arundel County shortly before noon on Sunday, Maryland Natural Resources Police said. The remains were sent to the Chief Medical Examiner's office in Baltimore for an autopsy, police said. Because of decomposition, the age, gender and race of the victim could not be determined, officials said. It could be weeks before the autopsy is completed and more details are revealed, a Natural Resources Police spokesman said Monday.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | October 27, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- A pattern of brass tacks on a coffin lid may hold a clue to the identity of at least one of the three Maryland colonists buried here 300 years ago."It may be a decorative pattern, a date, or it may be the initials of the individual," Dr. Henry Miller, chief archaeologist for Historic St. Mary's City, said yesterday.The pattern won't be decipherable until the lead coffin is opened during the second week of November. The tacks, with domed heads about the size of a dime, were spotted late last week during a fiberoptic examination of the lid of the largest lead coffin's wooden inner box.Archaeologists think the coffin may contain the remains of Philip Calvert, youngest son of Sir George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore.
NEWS
May 17, 1992
"What, you're not recycling yard and garden debris?"This phrase is being heard more and more in the environmentally conscious '90s. And there's a reason for that. Now is the time to begin composting. In the past, homeowners thought composting was difficult -- or worse, that it was unsightly and created bad odors. That's just not true. In fact, you can successfully create compost to serve a variety of gardening purposes. To help you help yourself and the environment, the experts at Flowtron Outdoor Products, a leading manufacturer of composting equipment, offer answers to several commonly asked composting questions.
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