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By Yolanda Garfield | January 13, 1991
Two apartments were joined together to create this spectacular open-space master bedroom suite. The owners of a Roland Park apartment decorated in a comfortable, Southwestern motif were ready for something new, white and deco. When the apartment next door became available, they purchased it and asked Lynne Abrams, owner and president of Details Inc., for design help.One of Ms. Abrams' greatest challenges was to incorporate an easy, streamlined flow between the two architecturally different units.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
One of Pikesville's most charming and well-loved buildings - a 1937 Art Deco structure fronted by a stately marquee - could soon open its doors to movie patrons for the first time in 30 years. The Baltimore County Council will be asked on April 15 to approve a zoning measure that would allow two 80-seat theaters to be added to what currently is the Pikes Diner on Reisterstown Road. "Even though the Pikes Diner operated as a movie theater for many, many years, for some reason that's not currently one of the permitted uses of that facility," said County Councilwoman Vicki Almond, who has drafted a change to the current zoning classification that would rectify the oversight.
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FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 19, 1992
I think it's curious that art deco should be making such a strong comeback in these recessionary times. After all, this 1920s style, despite its sparseness of line, has always been associated with luxury.Today, deco in its original form is clearly a favorite of high-style interior designers. And we also see deco-type designs, with a few changes in proportion, emerging as a hybrid contemporary look.Art deco could never be described as pretty, in my opinion, but like a good black dress, a properly executed deco piece can fit in almost anywhere.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | November 23, 2012
The project manager at the former Patterson Park High School in Highlandtown stood atop a roof terrace and said, "This is not a cookie-cutter property. " That's an understatement. Shaffin Jetha and Chuck Nale, officials of Focus Development, gave me a tour of the Southeast Baltimore landmark it has taken me 50 years to visit. I wasn't procrastinating; I just never got an invitation to view this under-recognized Art Deco-style school that once accommodated 3,200 students. It is now being made into 138 apartments.
FEATURES
By LINDA LOWE MORRIS | April 12, 1992
When Jonathan Carlson graduated from the Maryland Institute with a major in illustration and a focus on painting and drawing, he planned to spend his life working in two dimensions. But that third dimension keeps pulling him back.Recently a design for a lamp based on art deco lines started assembling itself in his mind. "I tend to build things in my head before I actually build them for real," he says.Since he'd been working with wood since childhood, he went back to his father's woodworking shop and built a limited edition series of his design out of bird's-eye maple and mahogany.
NEWS
By CINDY HOEDEL and CINDY HOEDEL,THE KANSAS CITY STAR | October 16, 2005
Like a little black dress, art deco has a timeless appeal. Its sleek curves and gleaming finishes achieve an exquisite balance between minimalism and ornamentation, masculinity and femininity. More than most period styles, deco has cycled around many times since its heyday in the 1920s and '30s. But the latest resurgence is more than a passing fashion. Designers and retailers say art deco fits in with several contemporary lifestyle trends: urban living, entertaining at home and a desire to soften the perceived "hard edge" of modernism.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | August 4, 1991
"This time we got it right," said Robert Heide, who, with his partner John Gilman, has updated and corrected their out-of-print art deco collector's bible, "Dime Store Dream Parade," which they wrote in 1979, in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Great Depression."Popular Art Deco, Depression-Era Style and Design" (Abbeville, is the expanded version of their illustrated survey of popular culture 1925 to 1955, which they have researched for the last quarter century with the fervor of archaeologists.
FEATURES
By Linda Rosenkrantz and Linda Rosenkrantz,Copley News Service | January 19, 1992
The fact that art deco has followed a long, circuitous course from its lofty beginnings in Paris in 1925 to its ubiquitous mass-produced manifestations in this country over the succeeding decades was brought home to me recently by the publication of two very different books. One is a study of the work of an influential figure in the inception of the movement, Jean Dunand, the other an examination of its distillation and effect on American design style.Jean Dunand, a participant in the momentous 1925 Exposition Internationale des Arts Decoratifs (soon shortened to art deco)
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | June 24, 2000
Tom Miller, a highly acclaimed Baltimore artist who invented a style of exuberant, brightly painted furniture known as "Afro-Deco," died yesterday at Joseph Richly Hospice in Baltimore after a long illness. He was 54. Miller's work was exhibited regularly in Baltimore galleries, and he enjoyed a devoted following among collectors here, who often waited up to two years to purchase examples of his work. Miller's furniture and sculpture were the subject of a major retrospective at the Baltimore Museum of Art and Maryland Art Place in 1995, and he was represented in several important group shows that toured the country.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
EASTON - It's a few hours before show time, and Carl Kasell and Susan Stamberg are in stitches. The National Public Radio news stalwarts are giggling over the script of a faux commercial for the International House of Muskrat (Where Quality Is Not an Option). They will play themselves and other characters in a wacky radio drama about a lost American Indian tribe known as the Okeydokes, trying to out-finagle Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. for a slots casino on Kent Island. The skit is part of a wisecracking performance of Radio From Downtown, the Eastern Shore's beloved radio variety show, which returned last weekend after a four-year hiatus.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2010
David Repko's waterfront bachelor pad defies the stereotypical notion of dirty laundry on the floor, a crusty stovetop and dishes piled in the sink. With its casual but high-style decor, the four-story brick home in Baltimore's Canton neighborhood looks more suited to James Bond than Oscar Madison. "When I got here, it was stressful to walk in and make design decisions," Repko said of the 3,200-square-foot home he bought in August 2003 for $610,000. But choices he made while the home was still under construction proved to be important to the task.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | February 18, 2009
A longtime merchant and property owner on Baltimore's west side plans to transform the former Kresge building on West Lexington Street and other properties into an $8 million mixed-use project anchored by a Valu Plus discount store. Baltimore Development Corp. said yesterday that it is awarding two city-owned properties in the superblock revitalization area to Carmel Realty Associates for redevelopment. Carmel will combine those properties, 109 W. Lexington St. and a vacant building at 119 Park Ave., with the three-story former Kresge's five-and-dime store at Lexington and Park, which Carmel owns.
NEWS
By CINDY HOEDEL and CINDY HOEDEL,THE KANSAS CITY STAR | October 16, 2005
Like a little black dress, art deco has a timeless appeal. Its sleek curves and gleaming finishes achieve an exquisite balance between minimalism and ornamentation, masculinity and femininity. More than most period styles, deco has cycled around many times since its heyday in the 1920s and '30s. But the latest resurgence is more than a passing fashion. Designers and retailers say art deco fits in with several contemporary lifestyle trends: urban living, entertaining at home and a desire to soften the perceived "hard edge" of modernism.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
EASTON - It's a few hours before show time, and Carl Kasell and Susan Stamberg are in stitches. The National Public Radio news stalwarts are giggling over the script of a faux commercial for the International House of Muskrat (Where Quality Is Not an Option). They will play themselves and other characters in a wacky radio drama about a lost American Indian tribe known as the Okeydokes, trying to out-finagle Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. for a slots casino on Kent Island. The skit is part of a wisecracking performance of Radio From Downtown, the Eastern Shore's beloved radio variety show, which returned last weekend after a four-year hiatus.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 11, 2004
A quaint grouping of three-story rowhouses sits a block from Boston and Clinton streets just east of Canton's revitalized O'Donnell Square. Twenty-seven homes - nine each on three streets - form a U-shape with a common courtyard where residents often gather for community barbecues or convivial chatter while washing their cars. In October 2000, Steve Appel, 41, co-owner of Nouveau Contemporary Goods Inc., moved into this brand-new development called Canton Gables. He paid $284,000 for his three-story, masonry and aluminum home, complete with a rooftop cupola and deck.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2003
Once a 700-seat, art deco showcase for the golden age of Hollywood, the Carroll Theatre ended up rolling films for audiences as small as one. The moviehouse was, by then, debased, split in half to offer two screens in a last-gasp battle with the multiplex at the mall. Now, 15 years after its last picture show, the theater's faM-gade is restored, its interior is refurbished, and neon shines from its rebuilt marquee. On Main Street Westminster, it is, again, showtime. The new Carroll Arts Center - which was dedicated yesterday in the first of a weekend of opening events - will be the site of art exhibits and classes, concerts and plays.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | September 27, 1998
She, in a sequined evening gown, lounges languidly on a high-backed settee with arms that swoop down into near nothingness. He, tall and refined in white tie and tails, mixes martinis in a chrome container, pouring ingredients from cut-glass decanters on top of a deeply fluted liquor cabinet. The room is seductively lighted with silver table lamps and small sconces; geometric shapes catch the eye on the walls and tables; the figurine of a lithe maiden, draped in a wispy fabric and holding a globe aloft, graces a desktop.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
WHEN NEW owners purchased the Samester Apartments in Northwest Baltimore in 1998, they could have wiped away many of the Art Deco touches that make the building so unusual. Instead, after consulting with their architects, the owners restored details that help distinguish the 1939 apartment complex from many others up and down Park Heights Avenue, such as bull-nose columns and glass-block windows. Today, it stands as the most fully developed (and restored) Art Deco-style garden apartment complex in Baltimore.
NEWS
By David W. Dunlap and David W. Dunlap,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 9, 2001
NEW YORK - If the New York skyline has a triumvirate of great art deco contemporaries, it might be said to range from the Empire State Building to the Chrysler Building to the almost anonymous 1 Wall St., the Bank of New York. Instead of jaunty design gestures, the 50-story bank tower is subtly clad in a wall that resembles a curtain: limestone with concave facets like billowing ripples in a vast expanse of fabric. "It doesn't have the immediate pizazz of Chrysler or Empire State," allowed Jennifer J. Raab, chairwoman of the Landmarks Preservation Commission.
NEWS
By Tom Gutting and Tom Gutting,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2000
The spirit of Tom Miller, the nationally known Baltimore artist who died in June, was alive and well yesterday at an exhibit of furniture art at Highlandtown Middle School. Taking their cues from how Miller repainted old furniture, pupils in Christina Russo's sixth-grade art class came up with their own designs to refurbish discarded chairs and tables. The exhibit opened yesterday at the school in the 100 block of S. Ellwood Ave. "I think this is fabulous," said Leslie King-Hammond, dean of graduate studies of the Maryland Institute, College of Art and a friend of Miller's.
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