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NEWS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | April 22, 2011
The Chesapeake Bay's underwater grasses decreased 7 percent in 2010, according to a report released Thursday by the Chesapeake Bay Program. The aerial survey by the Virginia Institute of Marine Science found grasses covered 79,675 acres of the bay and tidal rivers, down from 85,914 acres in 2009. Despite the decline, scientists said, it is the third-highest baywide acreage estimate since 1984. The grasses are a measure of bay health because the plants serve as food and habitat, absorb excess nutrients and reduce shoreline erosion, the program said.
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NEWS
October 1, 2014
In response to reader Grant Sizemore's letter, I agree that any animal bite is dangerous and that schools should respond with caution to one that enters their building ( "Feral cats pose a serious health threat to humans," Sept. 26). It is very unlikely that a feral cat would attack unless cornered and threatened, however. And I strongly disagree with his dismissal of a Trap-Neuter-Return strategy to minimize the number of homeless or feral cats. First, no one wants to see fewer cats on the streets more than the people practicing TNR, and they at least are doing something about it by choosing a humane approach to the problem that they can live with.
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BUSINESS
February 19, 2010
Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world's largest retailer, has seen sales at its U.S. Walmart stores fall for the first time, as price-cutting competitors lure away bargain-hunters. The 0.5 percent sales decline reported Thursday covered the three months ending Jan. 31. It was the first year-over-year quarterly decline since Wal-Mart went public in 1969. And it was a remarkable stumble for an institution revered and reviled for its relentless expansion and economic power. Overall, Wal-Mart's overseas growth and a concerted cost-cutting campaign pushed profit up 22 percent in the fourth quarter.
NEWS
September 26, 2014
In Yiddish you might call the perpetrator a paskudnik. In the street parlance of Baltimore, the term "dirt bag" comes to mind - as do some descriptions less appropriate for polite conversation. In any case, the driver who shot at several pedestrians with an air rifle or BB gun Thursday afternoon from his car yelling "Jews, Jews, Jews," according to Baltimore County Police, is clearly a moron. Thursday was Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, which, along with Yom Kippur, is part of the High Holy Days, a time for introspection, repentance and atonement, an irony obviously lost on the gunman.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 7, 2013
U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes has ruled that Detroit, Mich., may seek to protect itself from its creditors under Chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy protection, thus making this once proud city the largest municipality in American history to go bust. The city is $18 billion in the hole thanks to its debt and long-term liabilities, such as pensions it could not afford and people abandoning the city in droves, which led to an erosion of the tax base. It didn't have to be like this.
NEWS
October 6, 2011
Kudos to reporter Sandra McKee and The Sun's editors for several fine articles on thehorses and humans associated with last weekend's Maryland Million Day ("Eighttofasttocatch the champ," Oct. 2). It's worth pointing out, however, that The Sun generally pays scant attention to thoroughbred horse racing outside of Preakness Week. Our state's great racing tradition predates that of most others - including Kentucky's - and I'm old enough to remember when The Sun ran morning lines and race results on a daily basis.
NEWS
August 9, 2010
After reading the casino story ("Bright and shiny slot machines being plugged in," Aug. 7), I still can't understand why the two existing horse-race tracks are not getting any slots. Wasn't that the first intention years ago? It would have been great to bet a few races, play a little slots, bet a few races, have a nice dinner; play a little slots, bet the triple and go home with some winnings. For those that don't know, it's pretty exciting having bet a horse and seeing it come down the stretch with a chance to win. It's a shame that Maryland horse racing has declined the way it has. Duane McKeever, Parkville
NEWS
June 12, 2012
Your recent stories last week about the closing of Sparrows Point and the Maryland Port Authority's purchase of new cranes from China were sad in many ways ("Gloom hangs over Sparrows Point mill," June 5). This state does not care about manufacturing, even though it could be the foundation of the region's economy. Maryland does little to encourage an industry that at one time helped this country lead the world. Instead, the state purchases $40 million worth of equipment from China, a country that really should give us the cranes, since they will be used primarily to unload cheap Chinese consumer goods and to load raw materials we are exporting to China.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
Spice maker McCormick & Co. reported Tuesday a 3 percent decline in its first-quarter profit, hurt by higher material costs. Net income for the three months ending Feb. 29 was $74.5 million, or 55 cents per share, compared with $76.8 million, or 57 cents per share, in the corresponding period last year. Sales rose 16 percent to $906.7 million, up from $782.8 million, with increases in the company's consumer and industrial businesses. The Sparks company said recent acquisitions in emerging markets completed last year drove a third of its sales.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | May 29, 2014
Are consumers getting tired of jeans? One retail analyst thinks so. Changing the color and fit used to be enough to prompt shoppers to go out and buy something new, but "the lack of any real innovation in jeans has created consumer fatigue," Marshal Cohen, chief industry analyst for The NPD Group, says in a blog post today. Sales of jeans, which performed well through the recession, fell 5 percent for the year ending in March, Cohen says, with declines of 4 percent for men's jeans, 5 percent for women's and 10 percent for kids.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
The rise of this city in Harford County and its decline owed much to U.S. 40 and the car-centric culture of 20th century America. From World War II to the 1960s, motels and gas stations sprouted along the main road from Baltimore to Philadelphia to accommodate road-weary travelers. Diners served up coffee and gossip to neighbors and road-trippers alike on what was also the main local drag. But when Interstate 95 opened, running parallel to U.S. 40 just a few miles to the west, the flow of out-of-town cars slowed to a trickle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
I took a deep dive last week into Baltimore's drug scene. And when I finally came up for air, I had a newfound clarity on the city's troubled TV image and the line between responsible documentary filmmaking and exploitative reality television. Online Monday, I previewed a National Geographic Channel program that depicted Baltimore as a drug-infested wasteland of vacant rowhouses and lost lives. It's titled “Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire,”and if you missed it last week, you can see it again this week at 8 p.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
Ian Duncan | August 16, 2014
Malik Smallwood lounged in front of Baltimore's Juvenile Justice Center, puffing on a cigarette and his recalling his teenage years spent in and out of the facility - he called it "kiddie camp. " Now 18, Smallwood said temptation loomed on the streets. Detention, in a way, was easier and saved him from that. Yet any attempts to rehabilitate him at the East Baltimore facility didn't do much good, he acknowledged. He had returned for a hearing on his latest juvenile charge. Baltimore law enforcement officials and child advocates have long questioned the efficacy and ethics of locking up juveniles accused of breaking the law, arguing it can doom them to a life of crime.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 14, 2014
Federal environmental officials may be overestimating farm pollution reductions in the Chesapeake Bay, contends a Washington environmental group, which also finds that phosphorus and algae concentrations in rivers on Maryland's Eastern Shore have shown no real improvement over the last decade Those are the conclusions of a pair of reports released Monday by the Environmental Integrity Project. State monitoring data showed no reduction in phosphorus levels in eight waterways on the Shore from 2003 to 2013, while concentrations actually worsened in three rivers: the Nanticoke, the Sassafras, and the Transquaking.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
By any measure, statistics show crime has been dropping in Baltimore. Yet many residents, like Vincent McCoy, say they don't feel it. "I wouldn't put money on it," cracked McCoy as he stood outside of the Belair Road church where he is a deacon. "I've seen the city when it was good, I've seen it when it was bad, and I don't see when it's getting any better. " Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake joined police officials Tuesday to tout the city's success against crime during the first six months of 2014.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
Back in April, it seemed like a win-win deal. The federal government, with a workforce that has grown increasingly dissatisfied with training opportunities, negotiated a first-of-its-kind program: A Maryland college that caters to non-traditional students online would grant a big tuition discount for all 2.2 million federal workers — 25 percent off all undergraduate courses and most graduate courses — plus their spouses and legal dependents....
NEWS
January 22, 2013
Has anyone thought about the correlation between today's gun violence today and the decline of moral and religious values since the 1940s, '50s and early '60s? In those decades we allowed God in our schools, courts and businesses. Parents were allowed to discipline children when necessary (and the children survived). We were taught to respect our elders, hold doors for others and allow a vehicle to merge into our lane without a case of road rage. It did not take a village to raise a child.
NEWS
June 25, 2014
Dan Rodricks wrote movingly of a Johns Hopkins study of poverty that found if you are born poor in Baltimore, the chances are you will remain poor ( "A Hopkins sociologist busts an American myth," June 17). Yet the Hopkins study apparently says nothing about the rise of single-parent families and their statistical correlation to poverty and inequality. According to numerous studies, the two-parent family has declined rapidly in recent decades. In 1960, more than 76 percent of African-Americans and nearly 97 percent of whites were born to married couples.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
One year after one of Baltimore's most violent summers, this July opened with one of the lowest midyear homicide counts in three decades. Killings declined in the first half of 2014 to 97 people, compared with 115 during the first half of last year, when police worked to quell violence as 40 people were shot in a span of two weeks, including 20 over a single weekend. This year's pace puts it on track with a multiyear decline that ended in 2012. While Baltimore remains one of the most violent major U.S. cities - a toddler was killed early Tuesday - police officials have credited several initiatives with helping to reduce homicides, including more patrols in violent areas.
NEWS
June 25, 2014
Dan Rodricks wrote movingly of a Johns Hopkins study of poverty that found if you are born poor in Baltimore, the chances are you will remain poor ( "A Hopkins sociologist busts an American myth," June 17). Yet the Hopkins study apparently says nothing about the rise of single-parent families and their statistical correlation to poverty and inequality. According to numerous studies, the two-parent family has declined rapidly in recent decades. In 1960, more than 76 percent of African-Americans and nearly 97 percent of whites were born to married couples.
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