Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDeclare War
IN THE NEWS

Declare War

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mona Charen | June 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California was not pleased with the president's speech at West Point, in which he outlined the necessity for pre-emption against nations or groups that threaten this country. "I think this is a predicate for an attack on Iraq," the perceptive Democrat explained, "and I'm very concerned about it. I think it would be a terrible mistake for the United States unilaterally to attack Iraq, and to do so without any congressional authorization." Eleven years ago, we had a similar debate, about the same enemy, with a president of the same name.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 24, 2013
The Sun has accused the GOP ad nauseum of declaring a war on women, whether it concerns abortion or free birth control pills ("Republicans, choice and pain," June 21). Well, I'm accusing The Sun of waging a war on helpless babies, especially since The Sun seems to have no problem with killing potentially viable fetuses. It's hardly a "war on women" to insist a fetus not be aborted after five months of life in a woman's body. Why wait that long to end a pregnancy anyhow? I personally do not believe in abortion, at any stage of life, but I also am not to judge, as that is God's job, not mine, just as it is not The Sun's job to judge the GOP. The Sun needs to get off it's liberal, partisan high horse, have a heart, and stop contributing to the immorality and division that is destroying this country.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 24, 1990
With the Iraqi crisis reigniting the historic struggle between the presidency and the Congress over war powers, federal Judge Harold H. Greene has made the startling claim that the judiciary can intervene under certain circumstances when "action by the courts would appear to be the only available means to break the stalemate." Another federal judge, Royce Lamberth, sticking to tradition, has issued a contradictory ruling that the courts lack the "expertise, resources and authority" to intrude in such a "political" question.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | May 30, 2013
"This war, like all wars, must end. That's what history advises. That's what our democracy demands. " -- President Barack Obama at National Defense University, May 23, 2013 They say all is fair in love and war (I'm skeptical), but that doesn't mean war and love have much in common. When it comes to love, both parties need to be in on it. In war, all it takes is one to tango. Sure, if the nonbelligerent party doesn't want to fight, it can try to talk, or cut a deal, or even surrender.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | December 12, 1990
WASHINGTON -- While hopes are rising here that Iraq's decision to release all hostages may avert war in the Persian Gulf, key Democratic legislators are talking in concerned tones about the emergence of a "constitutional crisis" if President Bush starts a shooting war without seeking a declaration of war from Congress.They acknowledge that once such a war starts the practical imperative of supporting American forces in the field would make it extremely difficult to pursue a case against the president as a usurper of Congress' constitutional power.
NEWS
By TRB | December 13, 1990
Washington.CAN PRESIDENT George Bush launch a war against Iraq without the prior consent of the Congress? The administration says so. And sympathetic legal scholars are beavering away on theories to explain why the words, ''Congress shall have power . . . to declare war'' don't mean what they say.This is the reduction ad absurdum of the conservative campaign give the president dictatorial powers to make foreign policy. The last decade has seen all sorts of foreign adventures: Grenada, Panama, the Nicaraguan contras, the Libya bombing, the sale of arms to Iran and the reflagging of the Kuwaiti tankers.
NEWS
By Jack Fruchtman Jr | November 20, 1990
THE CURRENT DEBATE over whether the president should consult with Congress before beginning hostilities against Iraq is meaningless. The fact is that Congress will never again have another say about when America will go to war. Ever.This is startling, but true, given Congress' historic abdication of its authority outlined in Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution: ''Congress shall have the power . . . To declare war.''Of all the times America has gone to war over the course of its history, there have been very few moments when the president went before a joint session of Congress and requested a formal declaration of war. The last time that happened was nearly 50 years ago after the Japanese attack on the American Pacific fleet at Pearl Harbor when President Roosevelt in a speech which still rings in our ears (''A day that will live in infamy'')
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | September 1, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The seventh was the nation's first wartime election. President Madison preferred diplomacy to war to deal with British interference with American shipping (in connection with its waging of war against France), but Congress was dominated by "War Hawks," young Western and Southern members of his party like Henry Clay and John C. Calhoun.The War Hawks said they objected to violations of neutrality rights in principle. But as expansionists they also saw in war a pretext for annexing Canada and Florida.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | January 9, 1991
TOMORROW Congress will finally begin a formal debate on U.S. policy in the Persian Gulf. I say "finally" because the debate begins:156 days after President Bush ordered American armed forces into the area.140 days after he called up the first reserve units.120 days after he told Congress aggressive combat may replace sanctions.63 days after he proved he meant it by nearly doubling the authorized troop level for the area from 230,000 to over 400,000.I don't know whether Congress will ultimately approve a declaration of war; a declaration of no war; a declaration of let George decide, he's commander in chief; or a declaration of fudge.
NEWS
January 10, 1991
With diplomatic initiatives to bring about a peaceful solution to the crisis in the Persian Gulf now largely in shambles, Congress today formally begins a debate over whether to go to war. As the countdown to war begins, the choices facing lawmakers are these: (1) Give President Bush a blank check to do anything he pleases, (2) give him nothing or (3) adopt a resolution which lies somewhere in between. Given those bad choices, we hope Congress, and the Maryland delegation, will opt for the last choice.
NEWS
April 14, 2011
Why is the Baltimore Sun and all major newspapers and news networks ignoring the bipartisan bill H.R. 1212, the "Restoring Essential Constitutional Constraints for Libyan Action Involving the Military Act"? Thirteen members of the House have already added their names as co-sponsors of H.R. 1212 in order to improve its chances of getting out of committee and being debated and voted upon in the full House of Representatives. Is the White House pressuring media outlets to ignore this challenge to the president's war making freedom?
NEWS
February 17, 2011
The rich (and the Republicans that shill for them) have officially declared war on the poor. ("GOP pressing for budget cuts," Feb. 16) Since the '80s the rich have claimed a larger and larger percentage of wealth in the U.S. But there is never enough for them. God forbid we should end tax breaks for oil companies and wealthy Americans or cut in areas where there is the most waste (defense). Instead, they want to cut aid to the neediest, throw people out of work in a time of high unemployment, and cut funding for research and investment.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | January 27, 2009
Banks make their easiest profits not from traditional lending but from nuisance fees, past-due charges and other extra costs paid by consumers. Most are avoidable with a little vigilance. Declaring war on random fees can pay for a nice restaurant dinner. Bounced-check charges are almost pure gravy for banks, far surpassing banks' cost to process overdrafts. You should fanatically avoid bouncing checks. Checking-account fees are almost obsolete. Many banks offer "totally free" checking that lives up to its name.
NEWS
By TODD RICHISSIN and TODD RICHISSIN,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
TIENRAY, Netherlands -- The chicken farmer named Gerard Witlox works his farm hard and smart, with a strong back and a sharp pencil, cleaning meticulously after the birds, providing them just the precise mix of feed, protecting them from sickness and disease because, simply, their lives depend on him. And, in many ways, his life depends on them. In this community in southern Netherlands, about 10 miles from the German border, poultry farmers like Witlox are expecting the arrival of the avian flu and are preparing as if for war with an invading army.
NEWS
October 6, 2005
Modern presidents control war powers So Gregory Kane has just discovered Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, which says only Congress can declare war ("Protesters pick wrong target for their anger," Oct. 3). He may also be interested in knowing that, since the last time war was declared by Congress in 1941, presidents have always found ways of circumventing Congress and setting their own war agendas. After President Lyndon Johnson used the Gulf of Tonkin incident (which many historians now say never occurred)
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2004
In a race against the clock, state forestry officials will begin cutting down every ash tree in a 550-acre quarantined swath of Prince George's County next week and destroying the remains to stop the spread of a voracious Asian beetle. The all-out assault on the tiny emerald ash borer is necessary to halt an infestation that has the potential to threaten 6 million ash trees in the greater Baltimore area, state officials say. "The economic impact could be worse than gypsy moths," said Dr. Bill Gimpel of the Maryland Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Gary M. Stern | November 1, 1990
DEMOCRACY must really have taken hold in the Soviet Union if an astounding news report from Moscow is true: The Soviet government promised that it would not commit troops to the Persian Gulf without prior approval from the legislature.Now if only this ultimate democratic check on executive power, conceived by the authors of the Constitution, were regarded as something other than blasphemy by our president.President Bush, like presidents Reagan, Ford and Nixon before him, has refused to abide by the War Powers Resolution, which prohibits the president from continuing a war for more than 60 days without the approval of Congress.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | March 3, 1991
Saddam Hussein's defeat in Kuwait provided the lesson plan for history classes monitoring a modern-day war.And 17-year-old Emily Mitchell, of Broadneck High, says she and her classmates are more informed because of the blow-by-blow news accounts that prompted heated discussions in her International Studies class.But Mitchell and about 600 other students got a rare chance Friday to quiz U.S. Representative Tom McMillen, D-4th, one of the lawmakers who supported the war instead of prolonging economic sanctions against Iraq.
NEWS
By Mark Clarence Walker | June 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - Now that the war with Iraq is over and fresh questions about its legitimacy have begun to surface, one has to wonder about the role that Congress has played in international affairs since Sept. 11. One would not be remiss or incorrect to say that Congress has given the president total control over the conduct of international and security affairs even though the Founding Fathers of this country never meant it to be that way. They did not want a king to rule over them; they wanted a government that made good decisions at best but would take no action at worst.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 1, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld rode through the streets of the conquered Iraqi capital yesterday, six weeks after the United States began the war to topple President Saddam Hussein, and saw for the first time the results of the military campaign he had waged from the Pentagon. Rumsfeld dismissed any notion that he was indulging in a victory tour, but he clearly savored the chance to convene his top ground commanders and banter with cheering troops, 1,000 of whom gathered in a cavernous hangar.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.