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Declaration Of War

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NEWS
By Newsday | December 18, 1990
HE WASN'T quite Solomon, but U.S. District Judge Harold Greene neatly split the difference between President Bush and the 54 Democratic members of Congress who filed suit to prevent Bush from going to battle against Iraq without a congressional declaration of war.If there was a clear winner, it was the American people: Greene said in unequivocal terms that the Constitution gives Congress sole power to declare war. That point needed to be made, and he...
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NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | September 6, 2009
The first week of September 1939, when the world suddenly exploded into war with the invasion of Poland by Germany and the subsequent declaration of war by England and France, was defined by black headlines, extra editions and crackling trans-Atlantic radio broadcasts from foreign correspondents. The Sun wasted no time on Sunday, Sept. 3, 1939, when a mere 30 minutes after the expiration of the British ultimatum that Germany withdraw her troops from Poland at 11 a.m. London time (5 a.m. EST)
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NEWS
By Jim Mann | December 11, 2001
WASHINGTON - The main argument the Bush administration is using for its creation of military tribunals, its secret detentions and its other draconian crackdowns since Sept. 11 is that the United States is at war. Sure - except that we're not. Our soldiers are fighting overseas. We feel as though we're at war at home. But we're not at war under the Constitution because Congress hasn't declared war. And without a congressional declaration of war, the military tribunals and the other extraordinary measures the Bush administration has adopted by executive order cannot be justified.
NEWS
October 14, 2007
Five years ago, Congress passed the "Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq," which was a way of passing the buck to President Bush in an election season and letting him decide whether to launch an invasion. Ever since then, events have confirmed the wisdom of the authors of the Constitution, who wrote that Congress shall have the power to declare war. It's time to bring Article I, Section 8 back into force. It's worth rereading the actual authorization, to see what's wrong with it. There is some verbiage but not an overwhelming amount on the issue of weapons of mass destruction.
TOPIC
By Theo Lippman Jr | October 7, 2001
ONE IS THE loneliest number, especially when it's a high visibility congressional vote against a measure practically the whole nation supports - as was the case Sept. 14, when the House of Representatives voted 420 to 1 to give the president power to retaliate against the terrorist attacks on America. California Democrat Barbara Lee defended her lonely stand by saying that authorizing military force to stop terrorism wouldn't work, and "I felt let's not do anything that could escalate this madness out of control."
NEWS
November 16, 1990
Having botched the budget, will the Washington Establishment now kill the credibility of a U.S. military threat against Iraq? The recent performance of the White House and, more especially, certain elements in Congress has been dismaying. Although the rhetoric rings with constitutional argument and with compassion for our forces in the sands of Araby, some of the maneuvering has been crassly political or backside protective.Of all the balloons floated, the one most deserving of the quick puncture it got was the idea of calling an emergency session of Congress.
NEWS
By Fernando Goncalves and Fernando Goncalves,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 21, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Forty-five House Democrats filed a lawsuit yesterday in U.S. District Court in an attempt to stop President Bush from unilaterally committing U.S. troops to a war with Iraq.The group, led by California Representative Ronald V. Dellums and including Maryland Representative Kweisi Mfume, sought an injunction to bar the president from using force to oust Iraq from Kuwait without authorization from Congress. The filing of the suit was the latest skirmish between the legislative and executive branches over who has the authority to commit troops to combat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nicholas Thompson and Nicholas Thompson,Los Angeles Times | August 21, 2005
POLICY HOW THE IMPERIAL PRESIDENCY HIJACKED THE CONSTITUTION By Peter Irons. Metropolitan Books. 308 pages. Conservative judicial scholars love the Founding Fathers, and they have created a legal theory called "originalism" in which the founders' words essentially are carved in stone. If you're stuck with a complicated legal question, just think about what James Madison would do. "The Constitution means what the delegates of the Philadelphia Convention and of the state ratifying conventions understood it to mean; not what we judges think it should mean," Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas said in a 2001 speech.
NEWS
By Jonathan Turley | September 18, 2001
WASHINGTON -- There is something about the word "war" that is almost irresistible in confronting the incomprehensible. Within hours of the explosions in Washington and New York, calls for a declaration of war came from politicians, commentators and citizens across the country. War represents a total commitment and in recent decades has become a popular way for expressing our common cause against modern scourges. Starting with Lyndon Johnson's "War on Poverty," we have declared wars on everything from inflation to illiteracy to drugs.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | November 14, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Richard Lugar's call on President Bush to tell Congress exactly what his goals are in the Persian Gulf and then ask for a resolution of support will doubtless be seen at the White House as an obstructive act by a fellow Republican. But in the long run it could save the president's political hide, and possibly the lives of tens of thousands of young Americans as well.Lugar, as ranking Republican of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, is no soft-headed peacenik who runs from any thought of using military force to advance national interests.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nicholas Thompson and Nicholas Thompson,Los Angeles Times | August 21, 2005
POLICY HOW THE IMPERIAL PRESIDENCY HIJACKED THE CONSTITUTION By Peter Irons. Metropolitan Books. 308 pages. Conservative judicial scholars love the Founding Fathers, and they have created a legal theory called "originalism" in which the founders' words essentially are carved in stone. If you're stuck with a complicated legal question, just think about what James Madison would do. "The Constitution means what the delegates of the Philadelphia Convention and of the state ratifying conventions understood it to mean; not what we judges think it should mean," Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas said in a 2001 speech.
NEWS
July 28, 2005
Youth sacrificed as principles are demeaned The Sun's articles "War without the sacrifice" (July 24) and "Cheney opposes Senate bill on detainee issues" (July 24) speak volumes. When one reads the list of casualties in Iraq, it is hard to miss the tender young ages and the small towns where they are from. These young men and women are dying violent deaths. They are shot, hit by jagged shrapnel, blown apart and crying out in pain. Meanwhile, many others in their age group can be found in large population centers, where they crowd the bars on Friday nights, work hard to afford the mortgage on a nice house, and shop for clothes, cars and gadgets.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - One of President Bush's first declarations after 9/11 was that the United States was in a war on terrorism, making him a wartime president. He was right to declare himself as such in going after Osama bin Laden in Afghanistan. Without completing that job, he also earned the right to identify himself as a wartime president by starting the war in Iraq, though inaccurately tying Iraq to the events of 9/11 and thus to that legitimate war on terrorism. Finally, in invading Iraq with the stated purpose of ridding the world of weapons of mass destruction that had nothing to do with 9/11, he made Iraq a breeding ground for terrorists.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 11, 2003
SEOUL, South Korea - Hours after announcing its intention to withdraw from the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, North Korea issued a mixture of threats and calls for negotiations yesterday, warning that any attempt by the United Nations Security Council to impose sanctions would be a "declaration of war." It again blamed the United States for tensions over the regime's nuclear program while also seeking formal negotiations with the United States, apparently as the surest route to increase its own prestige and win aid from Washington.
NEWS
By Jim Mann | December 11, 2001
WASHINGTON - The main argument the Bush administration is using for its creation of military tribunals, its secret detentions and its other draconian crackdowns since Sept. 11 is that the United States is at war. Sure - except that we're not. Our soldiers are fighting overseas. We feel as though we're at war at home. But we're not at war under the Constitution because Congress hasn't declared war. And without a congressional declaration of war, the military tribunals and the other extraordinary measures the Bush administration has adopted by executive order cannot be justified.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2001
On Dec. 8, 1941, nearly 24 hours after the raid on Pearl Harbor, a grave President Roosevelt stood before a tense Congress. A half-hour earlier, stock market trading had been suspended. Americans, some 60 million of them, gathered around radios to hear the president's address. The 6 1/2 -minute speech concluded with Roosevelt saying: "I ask that Congress declare that since the unprovoked dastardly attack by Japan on Sunday, Dec. 7, a state of war has existed between the United States and the Japanese Empire."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 16, 1990
As the U.S. military buildup in the Persian Gulf accelerates, Americans are growing increasingly apprehensive about the prospect of war and want both Congress and the United Nations to approve any offensive military action, according to a poll by the Los Angeles Times.Though Americans continue to support the deployment of troops to the region, a majority of those surveyed disapproved of President Bush's recent decision to nearly double the U.S. military presence in Saudi Arabia.And a larger majority agreed that the United States should continue to rely on economic sanctions to force Iraq from Kuwait and not resort to war, "no matter how long it takes."
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2001
On Dec. 8, 1941, nearly 24 hours after the raid on Pearl Harbor, a grave President Roosevelt stood before a tense Congress. A half-hour earlier, stock market trading had been suspended. Americans, some 60 million of them, gathered around radios to hear the president's address. The 6 1/2 -minute speech concluded with Roosevelt saying: "I ask that Congress declare that since the unprovoked dastardly attack by Japan on Sunday, Dec. 7, a state of war has existed between the United States and the Japanese Empire."
TOPIC
By Theo Lippman Jr | October 7, 2001
ONE IS THE loneliest number, especially when it's a high visibility congressional vote against a measure practically the whole nation supports - as was the case Sept. 14, when the House of Representatives voted 420 to 1 to give the president power to retaliate against the terrorist attacks on America. California Democrat Barbara Lee defended her lonely stand by saying that authorizing military force to stop terrorism wouldn't work, and "I felt let's not do anything that could escalate this madness out of control."
NEWS
By Jonathan Turley | September 18, 2001
WASHINGTON -- There is something about the word "war" that is almost irresistible in confronting the incomprehensible. Within hours of the explosions in Washington and New York, calls for a declaration of war came from politicians, commentators and citizens across the country. War represents a total commitment and in recent decades has become a popular way for expressing our common cause against modern scourges. Starting with Lyndon Johnson's "War on Poverty," we have declared wars on everything from inflation to illiteracy to drugs.
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