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Decker Corp

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BUSINESS
July 19, 1991
An article in yesterday's Business section incorrectly described the recent financial history of Towson-based Black & Decker Corp. While sales have been higher than those in comparable year-ago periods, profits have fallen and risen in the last four quarters.The continuing worldwide slump in spending and construction drove down quarterly revenues and earnings for the Towson-based tool and appliance maker.A company spokeswoman, Barbara Lucas, said that sales and profits have been declining for a year.
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BUSINESS
By Gus Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2010
In the first round of job cuts tied to the buyout of Black & Decker Corp. by The Stanley Works, the merged company said Tuesday would lay off 37 employees this week who work for the tools giant in Towson and other Baltimore-area facilities. Last month, Stanley bought Towson-based Black & Decker Corp. in a $4.5 billion deal that created the world's largest maker of hand and power tools. At the time, the companies said they expected to trim about 4,000 employees from their worldwide workforce of 38,000.
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BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1999
A stunning first-quarter profit report posted by Black & Decker Corp. yesterday was virtually overshadowed by the resignation of Joseph Galli, the charismatic president of the company's power tools business, and a man many viewed as the eventual successor to Nolan D. Archibald, Black & Decker's chairman, president and chief executive officer.The revelation was buried in the company's first-quarter earnings report, released well after the stock market's close.The company said Galli "resigned to pursue other interests."
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | March 13, 2010
Shareholders of Black & Decker Corp. and The Stanley Works approved the combination of the two companies Friday in a deal that will create a multibillion-dollar juggernaut in the power and hand tools business. In one of its last corporate acts as a stand-alone company, Towson-based Black & Decker convened a special shareholders meeting shortly after 9 a.m. and got approval to sell itself to Stanley in a $4.5 billion, all-stock deal. About the same time, Stanley shareholders voted in favor of the deal at the company's headquarters in New Britain, Conn.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
Eric G. Regelin, president of Atlantic Builders Group in Rosedale, knows just how big a problem theft at construction sites can be. Several years ago, one of the company's backhoes disappeared, "never to be seen again," said Regelin. The company invested thousands of dollars in a custom security system for its equipment storage yard, an innovation that slashed theft. But the company had to scrap the system when it broke down because its builder had gotten out of the market. Losses from construction site theft come to billions of dollars every year and cut across multiple sectors - homebuilding, commercial construction and public works programs.
NEWS
March 20, 2002
Memorial service Alonzo G. Decker Jr.: A memorial service for Alonzo G. Decker Jr., former chief executive officer and director of Black & Decker Corp., will be held at 11 a.m. Monday at Towson United Methodist Church, 501 Hampton Lane. Mr. Decker, 94, died Monday of heart failure. Memorial contributions may be made to the Johns Hopkins University, Development Office, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore 21218. More obituaries next page
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1997
One day in the 1940s, when defense contractors ordered still more Black & Decker Corp. drills, Alonzo G. Decker Jr. was perplexed."Are they breaking down?" asked Decker, then the company's vice president of manufacturing and engineering."No, they're disappearing," someone replied. "Women are taking them home in their lunch baskets."Decker voiced his reaction to the company's board: "When females are taking drills home we ought to be making something just for the home."Black & Decker, of course, did.About 50 years later, Decker, the son of the Towson company's co-founder, can claim more than fatherhood of the do-it-yourself movement -- a movement that has spawned racks of magazines, huge hardware store chains and even a top-rated television comedy.
NEWS
July 2, 1997
The Campaign for Hannah More School has received $110,000 from Alonzo G. Decker Jr., chairman of the executive committee of Black & Decker Corp. and honorary chairman of the capital campaign.The $4.3 million campaign is raising money for a new career and technology center, which is under construction, and for the addition of middle school and administrative wings. The career center will be named for Decker.Hannah More is an independent school with 100 middle and high school students who have severe emotional disabilities.
NEWS
May 20, 1991
Joseph D. Zoeller, a Towson native who retired from the Black & Decker Corp. in 1973, died of cancer Thursday. He was 68.Services for Mr. Zoeller, a Black & Decker supervisor who was transferred to Connecticut in 1966, will be held June 2 at the United Methodist Church of Newington, Conn.In addition to his wife, Mr. Zoeller is survived by a son, Sgt. David Lee Zoeller of the New Cumberland Army Depot in Pennsylvania; a daughter, Vicki Timmons of Newington, Conn.; and five grandchildren.Memorial donations may be made to the United Methodist Church, 401 New Britain Avenue, Newington, Conn.
NEWS
June 12, 1995
FIRE* Hampstead: Engines from Hampstead, Manchester, Lineboro and Arcadia, Boring and Glyndon of Baltimore County, were dispatched to the Black & Decker Corp. manufacturing plant in the 600 block of Hanover Pike for a report of a fire in a storage room at 10:59 a.m. Friday. Units were out about 90 minutes. No one was injured.Millers: Manchester responded to a cleanup detail in the 3900 block of Schalk Road No. 1 at 11:56 p.m. Thursday. Units were out 24 minutes.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 19, 2008
Virginia Decker, the widow of toolmaker Alonzo G. Decker Jr. and a major donor to educational institutions, died in her sleep April 11 at the Glen Meadows Retirement Community. She was 91. Born Virginia Gent in the Chestnut Ridge section of Baltimore County, she was a 1933 Towson High School graduate. She later took continuing education courses at Goucher College. In 1948, she married Mr. Decker, an engineer, and a director and officer of the Black & Decker Corp., a business co-founded by his father in 1910.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | February 2, 2007
Seymour "Sy" Levin, a retired Baltimore advertising executive and sculptor, died of heart failure Monday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The former Owings Mills resident was 83. Mr. Levin was born in Springfield, Mass., and moved to Baltimore with his family in 1931. He was a 1940 graduate of City College and studied at the University of Maryland until he was drafted into the Army in 1942. He attained the rank of sergeant and served during the war years at Los Alamos, N.M., managing a warehouse.
BUSINESS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN and LAURA SMITHERMAN,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2006
Companies hunkered down after the corporate scandals, terrorist attacks and Internet bubble pop at the turn of the century and decided to focus on old-fashioned profitability. The strategy worked, and they amassed hundreds of billions of dollars of free cash, a record amount on corporate balance sheets. They could have used it for a mega-spending spree on new plant equipment, computers, office furniture, even real estate, but what did they buy instead? Their own stock. So-called "buybacks" skyrocketed in historical terms to $334 billion at Standard & Poor's 500 companies last year, pulling almost even with $342 billion that companies put to capital expenditures.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
Eric G. Regelin, president of Atlantic Builders Group in Rosedale, knows just how big a problem theft at construction sites can be. Several years ago, one of the company's backhoes disappeared, "never to be seen again," said Regelin. The company invested thousands of dollars in a custom security system for its equipment storage yard, an innovation that slashed theft. But the company had to scrap the system when it broke down because its builder had gotten out of the market. Losses from construction site theft come to billions of dollars every year and cut across multiple sectors - homebuilding, commercial construction and public works programs.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2004
LOCALLY Black & Decker Corp. Shares of the Towson-based toolmaker, one of the beneficiaries of the housing boom and hurricane repairs, rose $1.04 to $74.43 yesterday. The stock has risen all but two days this month and has gained nearly 51 percent this year. NATIONALLY MicroStrategy Inc. The company, which makes software that mines information from corporate databases, rose 16 percent yesterday after an analyst at First Albany Corp. predicted that a new product will accelerate sales growth.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2004
Black & Decker Corp., the nation's top power tool manufacturer, announced a deal yesterday for its biggest acquisition in more than a decade, a $775 million cash purchase of Pentair Inc.'s Tools Group. The acquisition will help the Towson-based toolmaker sell more power tools for use in the booming commercial construction industry, the company said yesterday. Black & Decker, which sells its own brand of power tools for consumers as well as the DeWalt professional line, will gain several big-name brands, such as Porter-Cable and Delta.
NEWS
July 14, 1995
An 18-year-old Reisterstown man injured his left foot when it was pinned between the forklift he was operating and a piece of metal at the Black & Decker Corp. plant in Hampstead on Wednesday.Marc Joseph Sommerville of Franklin Valley Circle was taken to Carroll County General Hospital and released after treatment, according to a hospital spokeswoman.State police said the industrial accident occurred about 5:40 p.m. and the injury appeared to be minor. Mr. Sommerville was backing the forklift at the time of the accident, police said.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2004
LOCALLY Black & Decker Corp. Shares of the Towson-based toolmaker, one of the beneficiaries of the housing boom and hurricane repairs, rose $1.04 to $74.43 yesterday. The stock has risen all but two days this month and has gained nearly 51 percent this year. NATIONALLY MicroStrategy Inc. The company, which makes software that mines information from corporate databases, rose 16 percent yesterday after an analyst at First Albany Corp. predicted that a new product will accelerate sales growth.
NEWS
June 9, 2003
Charles W. Layton Sr., a repairman for Black & Decker Corp. for 33 years, died Saturday of circulatory problems at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. The Rodgers Forge resident was 88. Known as "Layton," he repaired broken tools at the company's Towson center and helped design tools. He retired in 1979. Born in Baltimore, he graduated from City College in 1933. He enlisted in the Army in 1940. He participated in the Normandy invasion, and was in battles in Northern France and the Rhineland.
NEWS
March 20, 2002
HIS FATHER WAS co-founder of the company, but that didn't save Alonzo G. Decker Jr. from being laid off during the Great Depression. Good thing he was quickly hired back, because he went on to build the Towson-based Black & Decker Corp. into the world's largest power-tool maker. Mr. Decker, who died Monday at 94, did more than that. He revolutionized lifestyles throughout the world. His 1961 introduction of a cordless, battery-powered drill was a godsend for millions whose post-war suburban houses were starting to need repairs.
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