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By Stan Hochman and Stan Hochman,Knight-Ridder News Service DvB | June 8, 1991
Michael Jordan finished one of his moonwalks, a tongue-flapping, hand-changing, glass-banging, net-swishing layup, when Mike Dunleavy put his hands on his shoulders, the "Simon says" symbol for the abbreviated timeout."
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By Anthony Scalfani | December 29, 2011
Another New Year's Eve, another all-out celebration. Time to make plans. The close of 2011 will feature a whole host of fun things to do both individually and as a group all throughout Baltimore come Saturday, Dec. 31. If fireworks are your thing, you'll want to head down to the Inner Harbor, where Baltimore's New Year's Eve Spectacular starts at 9 p.m. with performances by the local funk and soul band the 8 Ohms. The Inner Harbor Amphitheater, located at Pratt and Light streets, is also the place to be come midnight, when the largest fireworks display in the region will have bombs bursting in the proverbial air. Call 1-877-BALTIMORE or go to http://www.promotionandarts.com.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2000
A Carroll County judge has given Deep Run Rifle and Revolver Club Inc. north of Westminster six months to reduce noise to acceptable standards, ending a three-year dispute with neighbors. In a 12-page opinion, Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. found that the 125-member club is a nuisance to its neighbors because the noise it makes, consistently exceeding 85 to 95 decibels, is well above the state's maximum of 60 decibels. Burns said the gun club's neighbors had proved that noise from the gunfire -- as early as 10 a.m. and as late as 10 p.m. -- has caused "a substantial and unreasonable interference with the enjoyment of their property."
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | October 15, 2009
Think of the loudest event you've ever attended. A Metallica concert? A monster-truck rally? Bike Week in Daytona Beach? Please, that's kid stuff. Now imagine that noise sustained for three hours and you have football at the charming Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome, where hearing goes to die and where the Ravens play the Minnesota Vikings on Sunday. Hey, Joe Flacco: Good luck calling signals when thousands of beer-swilling Vikings fans get wound up and the noise literally bounces off the Teflon-coated roof and around the tight concrete wasteland below.
NEWS
By ROCHELLE McCONKIE and ROCHELLE McCONKIE,Sun reporter | July 27, 2007
Anne Arundel has become the first county in Maryland to enforce the state's more stringent noise pollution laws, County Executive John R. Leopold said this week. Under the agreement forged with Maryland Secretary of the Environment Shari T. Wilson, police can fine people up to $10,000 for each day they are cited for exceeding 65 decibels from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m., and 75 decibels at other times. Previously, the county noise ordinances did not have specified decibel limits. "If it's a one-time, brief, loud noise, that's usually not going to cause a great deal of heartburn," Leopold said in an interview.
NEWS
April 4, 2004
Sounds louder than 100 decibels can cause permanent damage to our ears. The noise of a jet airplane taking off can exceed 120 decibels. -- Reader's Digest Facts At Your Fingertips
NEWS
July 21, 1997
The noise created by model planes flown by the Westminster Aero Modelers is "distinctively noticeable," but the levels are not in violation of state regulations.The Maryland Department of the Environment checked decibel levels at the aero modelers field after Ronald Frederick of the 300 block of Kowomu Trail, north of Westminster, complained of noise from planes flown on a nearby county-owned farm.Engine noise at the flying field ranged from 47 to 60 decibels. At Frederick's home, the sound was between 38 and 42 decibels, investigator David A. Jarinko reported.
NEWS
December 24, 1999
If ringing in the new usually means ringing in your ears, a free set of earplugs might lessen the risk of permanent hearing loss.The Johns Hopkins Center for Hearing and Balance is mailing free earplugs to anyone who wants them.Music concerts and dance parties can produce sounds as high as 120 decibels. Under such conditions, doctors warn, hearing damage can occur in as little as seven to 10 minutes. If ringing persists in the ears after such occasions, doctors say, that indicates minute hair cells in the inner ear, which transmit sounds to the brain, might be dying.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1995
For the past year, a thunderous noise from BGE's H. A. Wagner Power Plant has disturbed Estelle Kelly's sleep. But no more.Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. installed two 40,000-pound mufflers in October to deaden the sound from two fans in the plant's Unit 3. The result has been a pleasant change, Ms. Kelly said."
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 23, 1991
When your teen-age child or friend is ignoring you, it may not be a sullen pout. He or she may not hear you.Thanks to lawn mowers, chain saws, firecrackers, target-shooting and high-decibel stereos, young people increasingly are destroying their inner-ear cells that process sound and are slowly but surely going deaf."
NEWS
By McClatchy -Tribune | December 23, 2008
They're called the iPod Generation - all those kids wired to earbuds and MP3 players this holiday season as they hunker down to endure long road trips or relatives that visit even longer. But they're at risk of becoming the "Huh? What?" Generation. With the increasing popularity of MP3 players - and the loud, long listening habits of today's youth - millions of children and teens are at a newfound risk of noise-induced hearing loss. Doctors around the country say they are seeing younger and younger patients with hearing loss symptoms that typically don't occur before middle age. Many of them blame constant use of iPods and other players that blare music directly into ears.
FEATURES
By Kendall Powell and Kendall Powell,Los Angeles Times | August 2, 2007
Ted Ax knows he should wear earplugs when he leans into the noisy engine compartment of an MG sports car. He's been working among clanging metal and whirring power tools in garages for the past 15 years and has already developed tinnitus, a ringing in the ears that is one of the most common symptoms of hearing loss caused by excessive noise. But between the need to pinpoint troubled engine sounds and listen for the phone -- and with his fingers forever covered in grease -- the Denver man's earplugs go unused.
NEWS
By ROCHELLE McCONKIE and ROCHELLE McCONKIE,Sun reporter | July 27, 2007
Anne Arundel has become the first county in Maryland to enforce the state's more stringent noise pollution laws, County Executive John R. Leopold said this week. Under the agreement forged with Maryland Secretary of the Environment Shari T. Wilson, police can fine people up to $10,000 for each day they are cited for exceeding 65 decibels from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m., and 75 decibels at other times. Previously, the county noise ordinances did not have specified decibel limits. "If it's a one-time, brief, loud noise, that's usually not going to cause a great deal of heartburn," Leopold said in an interview.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | April 4, 2007
Baltimore's City Council is considering two proposals that would widely expand the scope of the city's public nuisance law, allowing the police to evict home and business owners who are repeatedly making trouble in their neighborhood -- whether dealing drugs or throwing noisy parties. Both bills have majority support on the 15-member council -- including from members who are opponents in this year's election -- and the council appears increasingly likely to embrace some form of the legislation this year.
NEWS
By MARIANNE SZEGEDY-MASZAK and MARIANNE SZEGEDY-MASZAK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 2, 2005
Even Florence Nightingale thought that all the noise in hospitals was harmful. "Unnecessary noise is the most cruel abuse of care which can be inflicted on either the sick or the well," she wrote in her 1859 book, Notes on Nursing. Victorian hospitals are now museums, but a new study has found that Nightingale's observation is even more accurate for the high-tech hospitals of today. As the decibel levels in hospitals have steadily increased during the last five decades, so has the suffering of patients and staff.
NEWS
By DOUG DONOVAN and DOUG DONOVAN,SUN REPORTER | November 2, 2005
A City Council proposal to substantially increase penalties against noisy neighbors may provide a painful civics lesson for raucous college students renting apartments and houses in North Baltimore. While the proposed measure aims to address excessive noise throughout Baltimore, it appears to have been spurred by neighborhood complaints about commotion caused by off-campus students from Loyola College and Towson University. "This issue is probably the most significant one that we face," said Sam Stevenson, president of the Lake Evesham Community Association.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2001
A Frederick County couple has succeeded in quieting a boisterous high school marching band whose booming bass drum made the trinkets rattle on their bedroom shelves. A settlement finalized yesterday in Frederick County Circuit Court says Urbana High School must "address the problems and issues" arising from the noise complaints of Paul and Brenda Geisbert, who live near a parking lot where the band practices. The consent decree, signed by attorneys from both sides, does not specify how the school is supposed to bring the volume down, but says some remedy must be in place within six months.
NEWS
By Dilshad D. Husain and Dilshad D. Husain,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 17, 1997
Erecting sound barriers north of the St. Johns Green neighborhood in Ellicott City has been deemed a high-priority project by the Howard County Planning Board after a recent decibel test proved noise from Interstate 70 was beyond the normal limit.Noise levels of as much as 70 decibels were detected in tests taken Jan. 16 and 17. Even that level of noise was not entirely accurate because snow on the ground muffled the sound, a planning board member said at Thursday's meeting.The tests indicated that noise levels peak in the early morning and late afternoon.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | November 1, 2005
Baltimore home and business owners could face eviction if found guilty of making excessive noise twice in a two-year period, under a City Council proposal introduced last night that equates loud noise with prostitution, drug sales and gambling. In an effort to clamp down on what supporters say is a leading complaint in many neighborhoods, the proposal bans daytime noise in residential areas over 55 decibels - about the volume of a loud conversation - a move that could muffle raucous house parties and corner bars.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2005
LAST WEEK'S column on sound barriers prompted Jack Robinson to wonder whether sound barriers were destined for his neighborhood -- the new Emerson village springing up along Interstate 95, near Route 216. "My wife and I recently moved into our new home in the Emerson community," he said. "Do you know of any plans to add sound barriers on 216 along the east and west sides of the 216 and 95 intersection, and along the stretch of 95 that borders the Emerson community?" I'm not aware of any plans, and without a specific address, State Highway Administration spokesman David Buck could not answer the questions.
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