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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A computer hacker vandalized the home page of the Department of Justice on Friday night, posting obscenities and anti-government graffiti, a department official said yesterday.The Justice Department's site on the World Wide Web was shut down early yesterday after members of the public called to report the electronic break-in, said a department spokesman, Joe Krovisky.The site will remain shut while the department's technical experts assess its security, he said.Krovisky said the system the hacker broke into was separate from the department's internal computer system, which contains highly sensitive information about criminal cases and investigations.
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FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
The Republican lobbyist who was seemingly grandstanding all week about introducing legislation to ban out players from the NFL has released the text of the proposed bill. "The American Decency Act of 2014" - which has, let's be clear, almost zero chance of becoming law - would make it illegal for "self-declared homosexual football players" to be employed by NFL teams. Unless teams provide "separate and distinct" facilities for gay athletes. So good news, closeted wide receivers and bisexual linemen: You can keep on, keeping on. Sorry, Michael Sam. Despite lobbyist Jack Burkman's insistence he means business , it's tough (though not impossible)
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 12, 1996
For the past few weeks, three federal judges in Philadelphia have taken a tour of cyberspace.They have visited World Wide Web sites where they could see London's museums, learn about their favorite sports teams or read up on health matters.They have also encountered sites with names like Triple AAA Adult Entertainment, Las Vegas Show Girls and Bianca's Smut Shack.Having completed their tour Friday, the judges are preparing to issue a decision that could be a landmark case on how the First Amendment applies to on-line communication.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 17, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Tucked into the $1.7 trillion budget agreement is a new measure meant to restrict children's access to pornography on the Internet.The measure was sponsored by Republicans working to overcome free-speech objections that the Supreme Court used in overturning a previous law.But even before Congress passes the new budget, the same groups that defeated the last effort are vowing to sue once again.The old act tried to regulate access by children to "indecent" or "patently offensive" pornographic material.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | July 30, 1996
NEW YORK -- A second federal court declared unconstitutional a law aimed at protecting children from sexually explicit content on the Internet, ruling that the measure violates protected indecent communication between adults.Yesterday's decision by a three-judge panel in New York, consisting of a federal appeals judge and two federal district judges, came in an Internet publisher's lawsuit to stop enforcement of the Communications Decency Act of 1996.The act seeks to ban the use of Internet computer services to display "patently offensive" sexually explicit material available to people under 18.The case was brought by Joe Shea, the publisher of a Los Angeles-based online newspaper called the American Reporter.
NEWS
By Taylor Lincoln and Taylor Lincoln,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1997
Within minutes after the Supreme Court struck down the Communications Decency Act, the word "Victory" flashed in front of a silhouette of the Statue of Liberty on the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Web page.The sentiment echoed across the Internet yesterday as free speech activists celebrated a ruling that Congress' attempt to protect children from online pornography had gone too far."The Supreme Court ruled that content regulation is truly something that should be left to the individual and the parent, not the government," said Lori Fena, executive director of the foundation, a San Francisco-based organization that joined in the lawsuit and got thousands of World Wide Web sites to display "Blue Ribbon" logos to protest the legislation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 17, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Tucked into the $1.7 trillion budget agreement is a new measure meant to restrict children's access to pornography on the Internet.The measure was sponsored by Republicans working to overcome free-speech objections that the Supreme Court used in overturning a previous law.But even before Congress passes the new budget, the same groups that defeated the last effort are vowing to sue once again.The old act tried to regulate access by children to "indecent" or "patently offensive" pornographic material.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | March 23, 1997
THE COUNTRY WITNESSED a curious spectacle this past week as lawyers for the United States government argued before the Supreme Court that the Internet offers too much of a good thing -- specifically, free speech.The ostensible cause for concern is children, who in cruising the information highway could encounter indecent or obscene material better kept from young and innocent eyes.Although many experienced users think it unlikely that children would easily find explicitly obscene material, it is not impossible.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Rosen | June 28, 1996
WASHINGTON -- On June 11, three judges in Philadelphia struck down parts of the Communications Decency Act. The decision, ACLU v. Reno, is being justly celebrated as an occasion for dancing in the chat rooms. The three judges understood how the old First Amendment battles are being overtaken by new technologies; and in an endearingly self-dramatizing touch, they had their separate opinions distributed on floppy disks.But for all their sophistication about the technical difficulties of regulating free speech in cyberspace, the judges were forced by the Supreme Court's archaic obscenity doctrine to rely on an implausible premise: that it's possible to distinguish obscenity (which can be banned)
BUSINESS
By Peter Lewis | June 24, 1996
EXPERIENCED Internet users often make sport of newcomers to cyberspace, scorching the so-called newbies for their lack of knowledge about the Internet and the way it works.But three newbies acquitted themselves especially well last week, writing one of the most lucid primers about the Internet yet seen.The primer, called Findings of Fact, was written by Dolores Sloviter, Ronald Buckwalter and Stewart Dalzell, who by all accounts had only limited exposure to the Internet before last March.
NEWS
By Taylor Lincoln and Taylor Lincoln,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1997
Within minutes after the Supreme Court struck down the Communications Decency Act, the word "Victory" flashed in front of a silhouette of the Statue of Liberty on the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Web page.The sentiment echoed across the Internet yesterday as free speech activists celebrated a ruling that Congress' attempt to protect children from online pornography had gone too far."The Supreme Court ruled that content regulation is truly something that should be left to the individual and the parent, not the government," said Lori Fena, executive director of the foundation, a San Francisco-based organization that joined in the lawsuit and got thousands of World Wide Web sites to display "Blue Ribbon" logos to protest the legislation.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1997
A Howard County Internet service company is beginning to sell subscriptions to a kids-only Internet service, an innovation it says can help parents -- and corporations -- control access to pornography on the Internet.The new service from Clark Internet Services Inc., called KidzNet, is being introduced as the U.S. Supreme Court considers whether to uphold last year's Communications Decency Act (CDA), which makes it a crime for a person knowingly to circulate "patently offensive" sexual material to on-line sites accessible by those under 18.Opponents of the law say the Constitution allows most limitations on free speech only when censorship is the least restrictive way to protect a "compelling" government interest.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | March 23, 1997
THE COUNTRY WITNESSED a curious spectacle this past week as lawyers for the United States government argued before the Supreme Court that the Internet offers too much of a good thing -- specifically, free speech.The ostensible cause for concern is children, who in cruising the information highway could encounter indecent or obscene material better kept from young and innocent eyes.Although many experienced users think it unlikely that children would easily find explicitly obscene material, it is not impossible.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 23, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge struck down yesterday a 4-month-old law that restricts the sale or rental of sexually explicit magazines, films and audiotapes at military base stores.Judge Shira Ann Scheindlin of New York City conceded that the law was intended to build respect in the military community for women. But she said the measure discriminates against sexual expression that is entitled to constitutional protection.Noting the military's "recent difficulties involving incidents of sexual harassment and acts of violence against women," Scheindlin said that if Congress wants to address that problem partly by restricting sales and rentals of erotic material, "it must do so in a constitutionally acceptable manner."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A computer hacker vandalized the home page of the Department of Justice on Friday night, posting obscenities and anti-government graffiti, a department official said yesterday.The Justice Department's site on the World Wide Web was shut down early yesterday after members of the public called to report the electronic break-in, said a department spokesman, Joe Krovisky.The site will remain shut while the department's technical experts assess its security, he said.Krovisky said the system the hacker broke into was separate from the department's internal computer system, which contains highly sensitive information about criminal cases and investigations.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | July 30, 1996
NEW YORK -- A second federal court declared unconstitutional a law aimed at protecting children from sexually explicit content on the Internet, ruling that the measure violates protected indecent communication between adults.Yesterday's decision by a three-judge panel in New York, consisting of a federal appeals judge and two federal district judges, came in an Internet publisher's lawsuit to stop enforcement of the Communications Decency Act of 1996.The act seeks to ban the use of Internet computer services to display "patently offensive" sexually explicit material available to people under 18.The case was brought by Joe Shea, the publisher of a Los Angeles-based online newspaper called the American Reporter.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1997
A Howard County Internet service company is beginning to sell subscriptions to a kids-only Internet service, an innovation it says can help parents -- and corporations -- control access to pornography on the Internet.The new service from Clark Internet Services Inc., called KidzNet, is being introduced as the U.S. Supreme Court considers whether to uphold last year's Communications Decency Act (CDA), which makes it a crime for a person knowingly to circulate "patently offensive" sexual material to on-line sites accessible by those under 18.Opponents of the law say the Constitution allows most limitations on free speech only when censorship is the least restrictive way to protect a "compelling" government interest.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 23, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge struck down yesterday a 4-month-old law that restricts the sale or rental of sexually explicit magazines, films and audiotapes at military base stores.Judge Shira Ann Scheindlin of New York City conceded that the law was intended to build respect in the military community for women. But she said the measure discriminates against sexual expression that is entitled to constitutional protection.Noting the military's "recent difficulties involving incidents of sexual harassment and acts of violence against women," Scheindlin said that if Congress wants to address that problem partly by restricting sales and rentals of erotic material, "it must do so in a constitutionally acceptable manner."
NEWS
By Jeffrey Rosen | June 28, 1996
WASHINGTON -- On June 11, three judges in Philadelphia struck down parts of the Communications Decency Act. The decision, ACLU v. Reno, is being justly celebrated as an occasion for dancing in the chat rooms. The three judges understood how the old First Amendment battles are being overtaken by new technologies; and in an endearingly self-dramatizing touch, they had their separate opinions distributed on floppy disks.But for all their sophistication about the technical difficulties of regulating free speech in cyberspace, the judges were forced by the Supreme Court's archaic obscenity doctrine to rely on an implausible premise: that it's possible to distinguish obscenity (which can be banned)
BUSINESS
By Peter Lewis | June 24, 1996
EXPERIENCED Internet users often make sport of newcomers to cyberspace, scorching the so-called newbies for their lack of knowledge about the Internet and the way it works.But three newbies acquitted themselves especially well last week, writing one of the most lucid primers about the Internet yet seen.The primer, called Findings of Fact, was written by Dolores Sloviter, Ronald Buckwalter and Stewart Dalzell, who by all accounts had only limited exposure to the Internet before last March.
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