Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDeceived
IN THE NEWS

Deceived

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | September 27, 1991
The first scene in "Deceived": It is raining, umbrellas are everywhere, and we know instantly we are in Alfred Hitchcock land.The time is well spent. Goldie Hawn stars. She is an art restorer who marries a young man, has a child by him and for six years enjoys much happiness.But little things threaten the marriage. The husband lies. He's supposed to be in Boston but has been seen in New York. Then there is a credit card that belongs to someone else but is in the man's possession.Meanwhile, there are murders.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 11, 2013
Baltimore Sun reporters Jeff Barker and Don Markus and editor Matt Bracken weigh in on the three biggest topics of the past week in Maryland sports. Mark Turgeon commented after the Florida State loss that his team needed to be tougher. What was he referring to, and is this a significant concern? Jeff Barker: The Maryland coach talks about toughness a lot. He did so last season as well. I've talked before about how -- in his second season in College Park -- Turgeon is still molding a team that looks like him. Anybody remember what sort of guard he was at Kansas?
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | September 27, 1991
"Deceived" won't fool you: It's a piece of trash.Goldie Hawn stars as an art restorer who's been married for five years to a curator (John Heard), by whom she has a daughter. Just when Hawn begins to suspect that her perfect husband is vTC not all she thought, he dies in an automobile accident.Her efforts to collect his insurance benefits lead her to discover that Heard had been using the Social Security number of a man who had died 16 years before. But during her search for her husband's genuine identity, someone ransacks her apartment several times, murdering her au pair girl in the process.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced Monday that it had ordered three subsidiaries of American Express to refund about $85 million to roughly a quarter-million consumers for violating consumer protection laws. In addition, several federal agencies fined the credit card giant $27.5 million. The CFPB said illegal activity at the American Express subsidiaries was uncovered by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and the Utah Department of Financial Institutions during a regular examination of American Express Centurion Bank.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1996
Levitz Furniture Corp., the nation's largest specialty furniture retailer, has agreed to pay $1.12 million to Maryland and seven other states to settle claims that the company deceived consumers with false discounts, the state attorney general announced yesterday.Under the agreement, Levitz did not admit any wrongdoing but agreed to pay penalties to Arizona, California, Connecticut, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Texas and Washington. Maryland, home to Levitz stores in Catonsville, Fullerton, Glen Burnie, Rockville and Suitland, will receive $102,500 in fines from the retailer.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 26, 1991
* ''Deceived'' A mystery thriller with Goldie Hawn as a woman who may have married the wrong man. John Heard is the man she weds.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1996
On your own: If you're hoping to advance in the corporate hierarchy, better plan on doing it yourself, says John Challenger, an employment consultant. Mr. Challenger says companies increasingly aren't grooming employees for higher positions. "Everything that has happened within corporations -- restructuring, mergers, acquisitions and layoffs -- has contributed to ending some of the paternalistic job structure that once included automatic promotions and pay raises," Mr. Challenger said.Don't hype: Joseph Jennings, a marketing consultant writing in the February issue of Upside magazine, warns promoters that hyping can set up false expectations about an idea or product -- and failure when angry consumers feel deceived.
FEATURES
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2003
Peter Casazza is big on The Matrix and its two sequels, knows all about the world the Wachowski brothers created, where machines rule, using mankind as fuel for their grand designs, and where human experience is only an illusion. He can relate to the movies' themes, gets caught up in the idea of fighting against the established society and its mores, understands the notion that free will is worth fighting for. But he's not planning on going out and killing anyone. "Entertainment is entertainment," says Casazza, who works at Big Planet Comics in Bethesda.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | September 12, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- An Annapolis firefighter caught in the middle of a departmental sex scandal investigation that fizzled last year is suing the city for $12 million, charging defamation of character.Firefighter Robert "Tommy" Thomas was fired after he was accused of having sex while on duty, but reinstated when officials discovered the investigator had sex with a woman involved in the case.In the suit filed yesterday, Mr. Thomas charged that Annapolis officials deceived one witness, lied at news conferences and purposely made defamatory statements.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Jeffrey Fleishman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 2003
SULAYMANIYAH, Iraq - Shawkat Haji Mushir died writing the words live always. The Kurdish legislator was assassinated over the weekend as he attempted to negotiate a surrender agreement for 121 guerrillas of the Ansar al-Islam militant group in northern Iraq. As he wrote the two-page agreement - a blood-splattered copy of which was obtained yesterday by the Los Angeles Times - he was shot in the head by an Ansar gunman who had deceived him. The pen stopped in the middle of the Kurdish salutation.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
The defense lawyer for a Perry Hall man accused of fraudulently selling $9 million worth of fake renewable fuel credits said he didn't deceive anybody because victims knew they were buying phony credits for an unworkable federal energy program. Rodney R. Hailey's lawyer, assistant public defender Douglas R. Miller, contended that the large commodities brokerages and the oil company that bought Hailey's fuel credits didn't care that the credits were fake. "Everybody needed [credits]
SPORTS
April 5, 2012
The recent article about the status of the Baltimore Grand Prix and Downforce Racing suggests the Maryland Stadium Authority (MSA) stalled the Baltimore Sun's efforts to secure material through the Public Information Act to prevent a public relations embarrassment for the promoter ("Slow Grand Prix start," April 5). That is not the case, and I would like to clarify the status of the agreement. First, MSA has virtually no financial exposure to Downforce Racing or the financial success of the 2012 Baltimore Grand Prix.
SPORTS
By Phil Rogers, Tribune Newspapers | April 3, 2011
Curtis Granderson has been a Yankee for one season and a handful of days. It seems like he has been in the Bronx forever. That's because Granderson is a rare breed — a highly skilled pro who is naturally aware of the world outside the clubhouse walls and works to forge alliances. The Tigers replaced him with an excellent center fielder/leadoff man in Austin Jackson but he didn't really take his place. You can't. Like Derek Jeter, he plays so much bigger than his statistics, which can be dissected to show he's little more than an average player.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2011
After being struck in the face and head by shrapnel while on patrol in Iraq in 2005, Aaron Joshua Lawless performed first aid on a fellow soldier and returned enemy fire with a damaged gun, before being struck by an explosive device — an ordeal that earned him a Purple Heart and Silver Star. At least, that's how Lawless recounted his time in Iraq to his employer, a Maryland gun store, and the Glock gun-manufacturing company, which decided to honor Lawless as its 2008 "Glock Hero.
NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department's inspector general acknowledged yesterday that he was examining whether outgoing Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales made false or misleading statements to Congress about the National Security Agency's terrorist surveillance program, the fired U.S. attorneys affair and other subjects. Responding to a congressional query, Inspector General Glenn A. Fine said that his office was investigating Gonzales' conduct as part of several ongoing probes into the activities of department lawyers on Gonzales' watch.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | August 14, 2007
Clarification An article in the Maryland section yesterday failed to make it clear that Linda Chavez, who withdrew as labor secretary nominee in 2001 after reports that she had helped an illegal immigrant, was not accused of employing an illegal worker. THE SUN REGETS THE ERROR.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell and Thomas Sowell,Creators Syndicate | June 21, 2007
The disbarment of Durham County, N.C., District Attorney Michael B. Nifong should be just the first step in remedying the gross and cynical fraud of last year's "rape" case against Duke University lacrosse players. Not only is Mr. Nifong still liable to civil lawsuits from the three young men whose lives he tried to ruin, and criminal prosecution for his obstruction of justice and making false statements to a judge, but there are also many other people who disgraced themselves in hyping a lynch mob atmosphere when this case first broke last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Orlando Sentinel | October 4, 1991
This Mary Agnes Donoghue thing is getting out of hand.For those who haven't been alerted yet, Ms. Donoghue is a writer who specializes in screenplays that glorify self-dramatizing and/or self-pitying characters. That was certainly true of the 1988 Bette Midler-Barbara Hershey weeper "Beaches," and it is also true of "Deceived" -- although the recent thriller is so implausible that Goldie Hawn's character is almost the least of its problems.In "Paradise," the Mary Agnes Donoghue formula is very pure because she not only wrote the film, she also directed it. What's more, two of its stars are children, which means that they were particularly dependent on the filmmaker to shape their performances.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell and Thomas Sowell,Creators Syndicate | June 21, 2007
The disbarment of Durham County, N.C., District Attorney Michael B. Nifong should be just the first step in remedying the gross and cynical fraud of last year's "rape" case against Duke University lacrosse players. Not only is Mr. Nifong still liable to civil lawsuits from the three young men whose lives he tried to ruin, and criminal prosecution for his obstruction of justice and making false statements to a judge, but there are also many other people who disgraced themselves in hyping a lynch mob atmosphere when this case first broke last year.
NEWS
By Andrew Bard Schmookler | October 27, 2004
WHY WILL so many Americans buy images of national leaders that are so at odds with so much evidence? This troubling question is crucial because the American democracy was founded on the notion that the truth will emerge in the deliberations of a free people. Fear is surely a factor, especially so since our country came under attack three years ago. When we're afraid, we lose our tolerance for ambiguity. Black-and-white thinking is in: You're either for us or against us. When in the grip of fear, we crave certainty, because uncertainty magnifies the feeling of vulnerability.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.