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By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
Arthur Miller's "The Crucible," which is based on events of the 1692 Salem witch trials, will close Dignity Players' sixth season. Director Mickey Lund is leading the troupe's largest cast ever assembled in the play, which is often ranked among the top 20 American plays. The production will close DP's 2010 theme of "Crisis of Faith. " At a recent rehearsal, Lund was coping with the logistics of a large ensemble, and working to make Miller's drama "more accessible. " He planned to modernize the dialogue and eliminate accents to bring the work alive.
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NEWS
April 30, 2013
Your editorial is just what I expect to be printed in The Sun ("Misoverestimating Bush," April 28). Typical liberal hatred of those who rise to the top on their own honesty as opposed to lies and deceit. Finton Cordell
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NEWS
January 21, 2004
THERE ARE ONLY two credible arguments to justify the war in Iraq. They are not conclusive or, in our view, persuasive, but at least they are arguments that can be taken seriously. They are: A muscular display of American military prowess was needed to impress upon various bad actors around the world that the United States is not to be fooled with. American troops had become such an irritant to the Saudis that they had to be removed from the desert kingdom, but because of oil the United States could not abandon the Middle East.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 28, 2012
One guy was among the greatest losers in the history of politics, the other, one of the biggest winners in all of sports. They were unalike men who shared little except recent headlines. But there was, in that brief juxtaposition, an object lesson for those who cared to see it. The loser -- George McGovern -- made headlines by dying at age 90. He is famous for having been on the rump end of one of the most thorough election shellackings in history, cobbling together a measly 17 electoral votes in 1972 to Richard Nixon's 520. But there was more to him than that epic loss.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND AND JULES WITCOVER | October 3, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Amid the current furor over carjackings, the country is now witnessing a crass attempt at political hijacking in the 11th-hour presidential campaign of Ross Perot.With utter contempt for the political process, the Texas billionaire says he wants to reform, Perot's re-entry is an unparalleled exercise in deceit and manipulation in a business that has seen much of both over the years.It is clear now that he pulled out of the race in mid-July because he could not stomach the news media scrutiny of his background and his authoritarian mode of business operations.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 6, 1991
HONOLULU -- A few weeks ago, 72-year-old Marylander Frank Bartos wept over Pearl Harbor for the first time.The memories, he said yesterday, came hurtling: the burning oil, the charred bodies, the unimaginable pain that the wounded endured.At a poignant ceremony for survivors of the attack, the Camp Springs man lifted his eyes toward the blue Hawaiian sky as a giant 48-star flag was raised for the first time in honor of the Pearl Harbor dead.Mr. Bartos, a retired ticket manager for the then-Baltimore Colts, whispered: "Could be the crying's not over yet."
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Lyle Denniston and Jonathan Weisman and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 23, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration dramatically opened a new legal assault on the cigarette industry yesterday -- a legally uncertain venture, based on novel ideas, that the industry will try to kill immediately.In a 131-page lawsuit against the cigarette manufacturers, the Justice Department blamed the industry for nearly five decades of harm to Americans' health and billions of dollars in financial injury to the federal Treasury."The tobacco companies should answer to the taxpayers for their actions," President Clinton said.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2002
For nearly five years, Martin L. Grass spun an intricate web of lies and deceit and fraud, enriching himself while driving his sprawling drugstore chain, Rite Aid Corp., to the brink of bankruptcy, federal prosecutors and regulators charged yesterday. The 37-count criminal indictment and a 57-page civil complaint filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission provide an extensive look into what the SEC described as "one of the largest financial frauds ever perpetrated on the investing public by senior management of a public company."
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1997
Virginia Childres, whose job it is to make sure Baltimore County students live where they say they live, kept driving up and down German Hill Road looking for a house. But all she could find was a cemetery.She alerted the principal of Dundalk High School, who confronted the boy's mother, who insisted that there was a little house on graveyard grounds and that the family lived there.But Childres discovered the small building was a tool shed. And just hours before school officials were scheduled to make a home visit, the mother -- who had stuck to her story for weeks -- withdrew her son from the school.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
Your editorial is just what I expect to be printed in The Sun ("Misoverestimating Bush," April 28). Typical liberal hatred of those who rise to the top on their own honesty as opposed to lies and deceit. Finton Cordell
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | July 11, 2011
Original scripts by local writers receive world premiere productions in the annual Baltimore Playwrights Festival. Most of the participating theaters have been in Baltimore and nearby suburbs during the festival's 30-year history, but this year, Columbia is getting in on the act via the Red Branch Theatre Company's production of Colin Riley's "Web of Deceit. " Riley's absurdist comedy tackles a highly topical theme, namely, how the Internet is affecting our personal relationships.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2011
Here's a look at the 2011 Baltimore Playwrights Festival: •"The Sculptress" by Marilyn Millstone. The former mistress of famed sculptor Rodin is visited in an insane asylum by a young female artist who tries to rekindle a creative spark. Friday through July 31 at Fells Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St. 410-276-7837, fpct.org. •"Web of Deceit" by Colin Riley. Mia is attracted to the online world; her roommate, Keysha, controls the computer. Both women are jolted by the arrival of Keysha's internet buddy.
NEWS
May 28, 2011
Benjamin Netanyahu's speech to the U.S Congress on Tuesday ("Congress lauds Israeli leader," May 25) can be described as an attempt to deceive the American public that he is willing to make a "painful compromise with the Palestinians. " Throughout his speech to the U.S Congress, I only found the audience's reaction to his words to be surprising; the way the U.S. Congress would applaud his historical and contemporary semi-true statements regarding Israel's democratic and religious tolerance along with being the victim of Palestinian aggression.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
Arthur Miller's "The Crucible," which is based on events of the 1692 Salem witch trials, will close Dignity Players' sixth season. Director Mickey Lund is leading the troupe's largest cast ever assembled in the play, which is often ranked among the top 20 American plays. The production will close DP's 2010 theme of "Crisis of Faith. " At a recent rehearsal, Lund was coping with the logistics of a large ensemble, and working to make Miller's drama "more accessible. " He planned to modernize the dialogue and eliminate accents to bring the work alive.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2008
Somewhere past chicanery and just short of espionage, the NFL draft will blow away all smoke screens this weekend. The truth - as personnel men see it, anyway - arrives with freeze-frame clarity Saturday. Was Miami Dolphins czar Bill Parcells playing mind games with his NFL peers when he began negotiations with Michigan tackle Jake Long as the first pick two weeks ago? Contrary to popular opinion, he was not. Were the Kansas City Chiefs shadow dancing when they sent Herm Edwards - the only head coach in attendance - to Boston College for Matt Ryan's private workout?
NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee accused Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales yesterday of repeatedly misleading Congress and suggested he had perjured himself in connection with statements to lawmakers about an anti-terrorism program. One after another, Democrats - and some Republicans - accused Gonzales of a pattern of deceit in addressing issues including his role in last year's firing of top prosecutors and his 2004 participation in an unusual late-night visit to the hospital room of his ailing predecessor, John Ashcroft.
NEWS
By Benjamin DeMott | October 15, 1990
THIS COUNTRY is in shackles, its thought, character and public policy locked in distortion and lies. The deceit stands at the root of federal and state budgetary chaos and corrodes every aspect of national life. It causes the chief executive to expatriate on the defense of "our life style" -- our life style -- as though the way of life of the privileged were universal. And that obliviousness is but a minor symptom of a vast, country-wide self-deception.Straight About Class."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2011
Here's a look at the 2011 Baltimore Playwrights Festival: •"The Sculptress" by Marilyn Millstone. The former mistress of famed sculptor Rodin is visited in an insane asylum by a young female artist who tries to rekindle a creative spark. Friday through July 31 at Fells Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St. 410-276-7837, fpct.org. •"Web of Deceit" by Colin Riley. Mia is attracted to the online world; her roommate, Keysha, controls the computer. Both women are jolted by the arrival of Keysha's internet buddy.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | May 31, 2007
Let's take a slightly wider perspective on Kobe Bryant's latest tug-of-war with the Los Angeles Lakers. The entertainment value of the NBA playoffs has been deteriorating daily and the postseason is lurching and stumbling to a pulse-deadening conclusion. And it's all Bryant's fault. If he had just looked around him three years ago this month and realized how good he had it, we might be witnessing the end game for one of sports' great dynasties. Bryant, Shaquille O'Neal, Phil Jackson and whatever pieces could be fit around them, eagerly financed by Jerry Buss - they could be grasping hungrily for a fifth, maybe a sixth, Larry O'Brien Trophy.
NEWS
By Adam Schreck and Johanna Neuman and Adam Schreck and Johanna Neuman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The brother of Army Ranger Pat Tillman accused the Pentagon and the Bush administration yesterday of deliberately concealing the circumstances of the former NFL star's friendly-fire death in Afghanistan in an attempt to avoid embarrassment. Speaking publicly for the first time since his brother was killed in Afghanistan three years ago, Kevin Tillman at a congressional hearing accused Army and administration officials of exploiting his brother's death to shift attention away from the detainee abuses at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison, which at the time was about to become a public relations nightmare for the military.
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