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Decades

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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | January 1, 2012
Batimore has hit another symbolic threshhold -- for the first time in three decades, fewer than 200 people have been killed in the city. A decade ago, city cops broke the 300 barrier. The Sun's Justin Fenton reports today on how that milestone was achieved and what it means . Justin wrote: "Though Baltimore is still among the most deadly cities per capita, as murder has declined more steeply across the country, the drop extends an overall downward trend in gun violence here over since 2007, the year Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III took office.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Facing a daunting 0-2 deficit in the American League Championship Series, the Orioles will need more than a little luck to make it to the World Series. They need some magic. For more than three decades, the team's penchant for comebacks has been captured in a song many fans still sing today. "Orioles Magic (Feel It Happen)" has accompanied the O's through the heyday of Wild Bill Hagy, through a 1983 World Series championship, through Cal Ripken Jr. 's 2,632-consecutive-game streak and through a 14-season playoff drought that ended in 2012.
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FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
From guest blogger Liz Atwood: Now I know why I've lost interest in shopping, wearing jewelry and painting my nails.  I thought I was just busy, but a new study says my boys may have changed my brain. The report published last week finds that women who share the womb with a twin brother or have baby boys have slight traces of male DNA in their brains decades later. The study concludes that genetic material doesn't just past from mother to son, but from son to mother. What all this means is still a mystery.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
The Maryland Zoo opened its first new major exhibit in a decade on Saturday, pinning its hopes on the endangered African penguin to spark a renaissance for the beleaguered institution. The new, $11 million Penguin Coast is now one of the first things visitors see after taking a shuttle to the park's exhibits. A small island designed to mimic a makeshift South African fishing camp sits in the center of a ring of water, so the penguins can swim in circles past an enclosed underwater viewing area.
FEATURES
December 13, 1990
Most of Frank Sinatra's countless fans were probably too busy yesterday listening to Ol' Blue Eyes' recordings -- in honor of the singer's 75th birthday -- to be overly concerned about our "It's Your Call" question regarding which decade yielded Sinatra's best music.Still, 169 presumably stalwart fans did call to express their opinion on whether it was the '40s, '50s or '60s that represent the high point in Sinatra's illustrious career, which actually spans six decades.According to the majority of callers (64)
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | September 3, 1999
Sparked by Andy Hoffman's 33 on the front nine, Pikesville handed Dulaney's golf team an 11-7 defeat -- its first loss in any Baltimore County match in more than two decades -- at Longview Wednesday.Hoffman, who finished with a 44 in his 12-hole match and contributed three points to the team score, got support from Sam Grilli's 2 1/2 points, Jasson Sieden, Steve Hoffman, Alex Scher and Jordan Steinfelder."The Dulaney coaches said they had gone back more than 20 years and couldn't find the last time they lost," said Pikesville's sixth-year coach Jerry Miller.
NEWS
January 12, 2006
Dr. Richard H. Pembroke Jr., a retired psychoanalyst who practiced at St. Joseph Medical Center for three decades and was an amateur astronomer, died of a heart attack Jan. 4 at Sinai Hospital. The Roland Park resident was 95. Born in Gassaway, W.Va., and raised in Park Hall in Southern Maryland, he was a 1928 graduate of St. Paul's School. He earned his undergraduate degree at St. John's College in Annapolis and completed his medical education at the University of Maryland. Initially trained as a pathologist, he served in the Navy during World War II and became interested in psychiatry, family members said.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1998
Sue Hess has been heard to say that when she falls in love, she falls in love forever.This explains much about her life, including her long love affair with the arts -- a romance she has shared with Maryland for two decades.As president of the Maryland Citizens for the Arts (MCA), Hess has spent the years coaxing, cautioning, and convincing politicians that the arts should be an integral part of every life and should receive government support. By just about anyone's reckoning, her tenure has been a terrific success.
NEWS
By ASSSOCIATED PRESS | January 15, 2001
TEHRAN, Iran - Wearing bright dresses of silk and cotton, teen-age models have been strutting the catwalk in Iran - the first fashion show in this country since the Islamic revolution more than two decades ago. In a nation where powerful clerics dictate what women can wear in public, the dresses on display come in a variety of colors, predominantly bright red, blue, bright green and khaki. They are both long- and short-sleeved, and some even reveal cleavage. The show, held as part of a youth fair and open only to women, has drawn more than 16,000 people to a north Tehran exhibition hall.
NEWS
May 27, 2000
LIGHTS dimmed on Broadway Tuesday night. One of the brightest stars to grace the stage, Sir John Gielgud, died Sunday at age 96. An actor to the end, he appeared in a film this spring - not a Shakespearean classic (his specialty), but in a play by existentialist Samuel Beckett. For eight decades, he never lost the acting bug. From early on, critics applauded. Many considered him the pre-eminent Shakespearean actor - even better than his colleague Lord Laurence Olivier. As one early critic put it, "No one has ever spoken Shakespeare with such intelligence and understanding."
BUSINESS
Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
The circle of political power brokers and deep-pocketed investors hatched their plan more than three years ago, seeing promise in a project deemed wildly unrealistic by some and stubbornly unattainable by others. With billions in backing from the Japanese government, the Northeast Maglev group envisions building a futuristic magnetic levitation or "maglev" train capable of transporting Baltimore homeowners to Washington jobs in 15 minutes, at speeds above 300 mph. Plenty in Maryland think it will never happen or shouldn't, given the price tag in excess of $10 billion.
NEWS
September 27, 2014
Thirty-second TV spots by Democrat Anthony Brown and the Democratic Governors Association deliver remarkably similar messages portraying Larry Hogan as someone opposed to abortion even in cases of rape or incest. The ads tie Hogan to long-ago proposals. What the ads say : The Brown spot opens with the question "Who is Larry Hogan?" It answers with a series of statements about Hogan's stance on abortion, asserting that Hogan opposes a woman's right to choose and wants to ban abortion in cases of rape and incest.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The infant mortality rate has dropped by 15 percent in Maryland in the past decade, but tick upward slightly in 2013, state officials reported Friday. The rate increased to 6.6 per 1,000 live births last year, up from 6.3 per 1,000 in 2012. No single cause was identified, according to a statement from Gov. Martin O'Malley and the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The main causes include low birth weight, congenital abnormalities, sudden infant death syndrome and maternal complications of pregnancy.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Robert Gately Keenan Sr., a retired Baltimore County public schools agriculture teacher who was a Roman Catholic deacon, died of a brain tumor Tuesday at Stella Maris Hospice. The Parkville resident was 77. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Robert Keenan, an electrician, and Mary Catherine Gately, a homemaker. He grew up in Miami, where he attended schools. He earned a bachelor's degree in agriculture education at the University of Maryland, College Park in 1959. As a student taking senior-year education classes, he met his future wife, Olivia "Libbi" Lange.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
For years, Steve Whiteman considered his old band, Kix, a forgotten relic of the '80s hair-metal scene. Even when the quintet began playing one-off reunion shows about a decade ago, the Hagerstown native viewed the gigs as cashing in on nostalgia. The “stupid money” offered, he said, did not hurt either. It took a trip to the Midwest in 2008 to unexpectedly change the singer's mind. The band was in the small town of Pryor Creek, Okla., for the multiday rock 'n' roll festival Rocklahoma, and Whiteman arrived unsure of what to expect.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Vivienne Shub, who played eccentric personalities as she delighted Baltimore theater audiences during a long and lauded run here, died of heart failure Thursday morning at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. The former Liberty Heights resident was 95. "Vivienne was one of the most talented actresses on the Baltimore scene," said Rhea Feiken, the television personality who performed with her. "You learned a lesson every time you watched her. Her dedication to the theater was enormous.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | February 8, 1992
Americans are already smoking less, drinking less, eating healthier diets and living longer than they were in past decades -- but the improving picture of U.S. health and fitness does not include everyone. Poor people are doing worse than ever.Wracked by the worsening scourges of violence, drugs, AIDS and teen-age pregnancy, the nation's underclass is actually faring worse than their counterparts did several decades ago, according to some public health experts."The country is really broken into two countries," said Dr. Scott Zeger, senior associate dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2012
Phyllis J. Rouzer, a homemaker and former jewelry sales associate, died Dec. 27 of cancer at Lorien Assisted Living in Mount Airy. The longtime resident of Poplar Springs, Howard County, was 92. The daughter of a radio station executive and homemaker, the former Phyllis J. Rhoads was born in Syracuse, N.Y., and moved to Baltimore with her family when she was a child. A 1937 graduate of Eastern High School, Mrs. Rouzer attended a secretarial school and worked briefly as a legal secretary before her marriage to George William Rouzer in 1939.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Under Armour will continue to supply uniforms to the University of Maryland's varsity teams under a 10-year extension deal announced Tuesday. The Baltimore-based sports brand will continue to design and supply game-day uniforms as well as footwear, apparel and equipment for training for all men's and women's varsity teams. "The University of Maryland is an integral part of Under Armour's history, culture and identity," Matt Mirchin, Under Armour's executive vice president of global marketing, said in the company's announcement.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | August 31, 2014
Fifty years ago this summer, the Civil Rights Act was signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson, marking a watershed moment in our nation's history and in the ongoing struggle of African-Americans for fair and equal treatment. The passage of the law, which outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin, and ended voter discrimination and segregation of schools, came amidst a tumultuous period that saw sit-ins, marches and mass protests staged from major cities to college campuses of every size.
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